September is Food Safety Month: Why Use Disposable Gloves?

The National Restaurant Association celebrates National Food Safety Month, every September as a way to increase awareness and education about proper food handling. The month-long event was established in 1994 and promotes food safety awareness through prevention and protection.  September is Food Safety Month:  Why Use Gloves?

Food Safety Month is an ideal time to highlight the benefits of disposable glove use in industrial applications such as food service, food processing and even home-use.  Restaurants and other food service venues all have a need to protect employees who need disposable gloves for safe food handling.  That equals

Did you know that the disposable glove revenue from the food service industry is an estimated $3.3 billion?

That number represents a lot of glove sales!  In fact, disposable glove revenue will continue to grow 29 percent to $4.3 billion in glove revenue opportunity by 2022. Throughout Food Safety Month this September, AMMEX will support NFSM and help to educate buyers regarding the uses of gloves.

Food Safety in Restaurants
The NRA comprises 970,000 restaurant and food service outlets in the U.S., covering a workforce of close to 13 million employees. The term food service also applies to any environment in which food is served, including sit-down restaurants, food trucks, college cafeterias, and more. If staff members handle or serve food, it is a food service establishment, which means they need to be aware of proper sanitation and hygiene guidelines.

Why Use Gloves In the Food Industry?
Everyone involved in the food service industry, all have one thing in common: the need to be proactive  about containing possible pathogens and protecting employees and consumers from illnesses. Disposable gloves are among the first line of defense against foodborne illnesses like norovirus and salmonella, as well as bacteria that may be transferred to food through contamination, such as E.coli or hepatitis A. That’s why the NRA’s NFSM events are so important: It helps food service organizations prevent foodborne pathogens. When it comes to food service workers and hygiene, another trusted authority on food safety and proper handling is the CDC. Consider the following statics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Did You Know?

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-IndustryAbout 20 million people get sick from norovirus each year

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-Industry#1 cause of outbreaks from contaminated food in the US.

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-IndustryInfected food workers cause about 70% of reported outbreaks

Norovirus and other foodborne illnesses from contaminated food are common in the food service industry.  Unfortunately, food service workers often go to work when they are sick and may contaminate food.  Of outbreaks caused by infected food workers, 54% involve food workers touching ready-to-eat-foods with their bare hands. Ready-to-eat foods are foods that are ready to be served without additional preparation, such as washed raw fruits and vegetables for salads or sandwiches, baked goods, or items that have already been cooked.Observations of food service workers have shown that they practice proper hand washing only 1 in 4 times.

Observations of food service workers have shown that they practice proper hand washing only 1 in 4 times.

What Can be Done?

Prevention, protection and policies are some of the key actions to take in fighting food contamination and foodborne illness. Tools such as disposable gloves and personal protective equipment are essential in protecting consumers.

Food service industry can

  • Adhere to food safety laws and regulations.
  • Certify kitchen managers and train food service workers in food safety practices.
  • Establish policies that require workers to stay home while sick with vomiting and diarrhea for at least 48 hours after symptoms stop.
  • Foster a work environment that encourages workers to stay home when sick, by considering such measures such as paid sick leave and a staffing plan that includes on-call workers.

Food service workers can

  • Tell a manager when sick with symptoms of norovirus such as vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Wash hands carefully and often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the restroom.
  • Use single-use disposable gloves to avoid touching ready-to-eat foods with bare hands.
  • Regularly clean and sanitize kitchen surfaces and frequently touched objects, using a chlorine based product or other sanitizer approved by the Environmental Protection Agency for use against norovirus.
  • Immediately block off, clean, and disinfect areas where there has been a vomiting or diarrheal incident.
  • Carefully wash fruits and vegetables and avoid serving undercooked (below 140°F) oysters and other shellfish.
  • Visit www.FoodSafety.gov for the latest information.

The CDC strongly recommends food workers use disposable gloves to avoid touching food with bare hands.

September is Food Safety Month:  Why Use Disposable Gloves?

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Food service disposable gloves can help prevent food contamination and foodborne illness in the food service industry.  Protecting workers and consumers against foodborne illness is a major concern in the food service industry. Tarnished reputations and decreased profits are the consequences when restaurants have to close due to foodborne illness.

No matter what the application or the needs of your staff, AMMEX has a glove that fits.  Regardless of which disposable gloves food service workers use, poly, vinyl, and latex disposable gloves are a smart investment for the foodservice industry.
Thousands of distributors rely on AMMEX to supply their customers in the food service industry with high-quality AMMEX disposable gloves. Contact us today to become an AMMEX distributor and learn how we help our distributors grow their glove sales on average of 31%!  Be sure to follow along with us through the month of September and show your support for Food Safety Month by using the #FoodSafetyMonth and #FoodSafetyGloves
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Help Prevent Norovirus Outbreaks in the Food Service Industry


The Norovirus is commonly associated with wide-spread illness that occurs on cruise ships, but those account for only about 1% of all reported norovirus outbreaks. Recent news of Norovirus affecting a popular restaurant chain confirms that it can occur anywhere people gather or food is served.  Infected people can spread norovirus to others through close contact or by contaminating food and surfaces. Food service workers who have the norovirus can contaminate food and make many people sick. However, there are ways to help prevent norovirus outbreaks in the food service industry such as following food service safety practices like proper barrier protection and hygiene policies.

A Boston-area Chipotle has been shut down temporarily after an employee was diagnosed with norovirus and two others reported similar symptoms,CBS Boston reports.

News such as this highlights the facts that the Norovirus, is highly contagious – often spread by infected food service workers – and immediate action should be taken to help prevent norovirus outbreaks in the food service industry.

Consider these Norovirus statistics from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-IndustryAbout 20 million people get sick from norovirus each year

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-Industry#1 cause of outbreaks from contaminated food in the US.

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-IndustryInfected food workers cause about 70% of reported outbreaks

Norovirus outbreaks from contaminated food are common in the food service industry because food service industry workers often go to work when they are sick and may contaminate food.  Of outbreaks caused by infected food workers, 54% involve food workers touching ready-to-eat-foods with their bare hands. Ready-to-eat foods are foods that are ready to be served without additional preparation, such as washed raw fruits and vegetables for salads or sandwiches, baked goods, or items that have already been cooked.

Observations of food service workers have shown that they practice proper hand washing only 1 in 4 times.

Norovirus is hard to kill and stays on food, kitchen surfaces, and utensils. It can remain infectious on foods even at freezing temperatures and until heated above 140°F and can stay on countertops and serving utensils for up to 2 weeks.  Norovirus can also be resistant to many common disinfectants and hand sanitizers.

What can be done to help prevent norovirus outbreaks in the food service industry?

Food service industry can

  • Adhere to food safety laws and regulations.
  • Certify kitchen managers and train food service workers in food safety practices.
  • Establish policies that require workers to stay home while sick with vomiting and diarrhea for at least 48 hours after symptoms stop.
  • Foster a work environment that encourages workers to stay home when sick, by considering such measures such as paid sick leave and a staffing plan that includes on-call workers.

Food service workers can

  • Tell a manager when sick with symptoms of norovirus such as vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Wash hands carefully and often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the restroom.
  • Use single-use disposable gloves to avoid touching ready-to-eat foods with bare hands.
  • Regularly clean and sanitize kitchen surfaces and frequently touched objects, using a chlorine based product or other sanitizer approved by the Environmental Protection Agency for use against norovirus.
  • Immediately block off, clean, and disinfect areas where there has been a vomiting or diarrheal incident.
  • Carefully wash fruits and vegetables and avoid serving undercooked (below 140°F) oysters and other shellfish.
  • Visit www.FoodSafety.gov for the latest information.

Due to the nature of the food service industry – where workers directly handle food  – disposable glove usage in this sector is common. The U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) requires all employees to wash their hands if they make contact with food. However, when it comes to the prevention of norovirus, food service disposable gloves are the most effective barrier protection according to the CDC – it helps to prevent the spread of the norovirus.

The CDC strongly recommends food workers use disposable gloves to avoid touching food with bare hands.

Food service disposable gloves, such as polyethylene gloves commonly referred to as poly gloves are a popular choice in the food service industry.  Disposable poly gloves such as, AMMEX Poly are ideal for food service since they are single-use and workers tend to switch between various light-duty tasks, and they need a disposable glove that can accommodate their workflow.

Another popular single-use disposable glove for food service is polyvinyl chloride (PVC), also known as vinyl.  Disposable gloves such as AMMEX AntiMicrobial Vinyl are single use, FDA approved for food service and they contain an antimicrobial agent to help inhibit the growth of microorganisms.

Regardless of which disposable gloves food service workers use, poly, vinyl, and latex disposable gloves are a smart investment for the food service industry.  Food service disposable gloves can help prevent norovirus outbreaks in the food service industry – protecting workers and consumers against foodborne illness – And helps to protect businesses against tarnished reputations and decreased profits when restaurants have to close due to outbreaks.  Thousands of distributors rely on AMMEX to supply their customers in the food service industry with high-quality AMMEX disposable gloves. Contact us today to become an AMMEX distributor and learn how we help our distributors grow their glove sales on average of 31%!

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Glove Potential in Restaurants


The restaurant industry represents one of the greatest opportunities for glove sales. According to data from the National Restaurant Association, there are roughly 1 million restaurant locations in the U.S. and 14 million restaurant employees. On top of that, workers in food service use gloves more than employees in just about any other industry. With each individual worker using an average of 20 pairs of gloves every single day, the restaurant industry collectively goes through more than 200 million pairs of gloves on a daily basis.

“Each restaurant worker goes through 20 pairs of gloves every day.”

The reason those in the foodservice industry utilize gloves so heavily is because of the safety regulations that govern this environment. Foodservice employees must either wash their hands or wear gloves whenever they handle ingredients that customers will consume to prevent the spread of pathogens. Here are a few of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s guidelines for hand sanitation and glove usage:

  • Workers must minimize bare hand and arm contact with exposed food that is not ready to eat.
  • Gloves or utensils such as tongs and spatulas must be used for contact with exposed, ready-to-eat foods except when washing fruits and vegetables.
  • Gloves can be used for a single task and must be discarded when workers switch to a new task, the gloves become soiled or the task is interrupted.

Workers in foodservice tend to use poly or vinyl gloves because they are relatively inexpensive – an important consideration for companies that know employees will switch gloves frequently. These industries avoid latex gloves in case some of the proteins pass into the food and cause a customer to have an allergic reaction. Nitrile gloves are more durable but with a higher price point, making them less appealing for foodservice. However, for certain jobs where puncture resistance is needed or even for cleaning up at the end of a shift, nitrile gloves may come in handy at restaurants.

Contact us or your AMMEX representative to learn more about gloves suitable for the restaurant industry.

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Gloves in Cafeterias


Gloves are a necessity in cafeterias around the country to ensure food safety. When people think of food production environments, cafeterias don’t often come to mind, but there are many of these establishments around the country. According to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are more than 400,000 people employed in cafeterias across the U.S., in schools, hospitals, continuing care facilities and even office buildings. Schools are the most prominent of these environments, with more than 120,000 individuals in school cafeterias.

With foodservice overall set to to increase 29 percent to become a $4.3 billion market by 2022, this creates a great opportunity for distributors to sell more gloves! In the foodservice industry, employees are required to change gloves with every new task, meaning these institutions require a large number of gloves on hand to accommodate all the different tasks that need to be performed.

For those in the foodservice industry, vinyl and nitrile gloves are generally the smartest choices because they are durable and lack latex proteins which can contribute to sensitivity. Vinyl gloves provide great dexterity by conforming closely to the hand. Antimicrobial gloves can also be used to more effectively prevent the transfer of harmful bacteria.

​Meanwhile, nitrile reacts to body temperature, which makes it conform for a perfect fit. Nitrile gloves also feature three times the puncture resistance of latex, which is useful in an environment that requires the use of sharp objects. Nitrile is also a smart choice for cleaning tasks, as it is resistant to many cleaning chemicals.

Contact us or your AMMEX representative to learn more about nitrile and vinyl gloves in cafeteria environments.

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3 Food Industry Terms to Know


Sept. 1 kicks off the National Restaurant Association’s National Food Safety Month (NFSM). The event, which recently passed its 20th anniversary, highlights the need for proper food handling throughout the food industry. Over the course of the month AMMEX will support NFSM and provide extra insight into safety throughout the food industry.

The theme for this year is “Let it Flow,” focusing on the movement of food through the food service industry. It will raise awareness for how to maintain proper food safety at each point in the restaurant, from receiving the goods and storing them to serving prepared meals.

As food service workers gain knowledge about food service over the next 30 days, they may run into some unfamiliar industry-specific terms for various kinds of distributors and businesses. Here is a short guide to some of these terms:

Center of the plate
This term generally refers to meat suppliers, or vendors that restaurants and other food service environments work with to source beef, pork, lamb and other animal products. Most food service businesses’ pay more for center-of-the-plate items than anything else. Finding a high-quality meat source is a key consideration for many businesses.

“The center of the plate generates the highest costs for food service businesses.”

Broadline
Distributors that describe themselves as broadline carry a wide variety of products, from dry and frozen goods up to paper goods, and are often considered a one-stop shop for many food service environments. They may also carry meat, dairy and produce and offer delivery services. According to food industry research firm Technomic, the average broadline distributor carries between 8,000 and 12,000 stock keeping units. Increasingly, businesses are moving into broadline distribution because it is more lucrative to offer more options to customers.

C-Store
A c-store is a convenience store, such as 7-Eleven and Speedway, which sell prepared foods for immediate consumption. As businesses recognize the need to create a space for customers to eat, the average size of the convenience storing is increasing, according to the Association for Convenience and Fuel Retailing. In addition, as sales from tobacco decrease, food service sales are fast becoming the category these businesses profit from the most.

As food moves throughout the supply chain, it is key for foodservice workers to handle ingredients carefully to prevent cross-contamination and other issues. Disposable gloves play a central role in food safety, from the center of the plate to the convenience store.

No matter the application or needs of your staff, AMMEX has a glove that fits. Be sure to follow along with us through the month of September and show your support by using the hashtags #FoodSafetyMonth and #LetItFlow2015.

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September is National Food Safety Month


Each September, the National Restaurant Association celebrates National Food Safety Month as a way to increase awareness and education about proper food handling. The event was established in 1994 and recently passed its 20-year anniversary. This educational event raises visibility about food safety, and it’s also a great opportunity to sell more gloves. Restaurants and other food service venues all have a large number of staff who need disposable gloves for safe food handling. Thus, the food industry represents a great opportunity for glove sales. In 2012, glove revenue from this industry reached $3.3 billion and will grow 29 percent to $4.3 billion in glove revenue opportunity by 2022. Throughout September, AMMEX will support NFSM and help to educate buyers regarding the uses of gloves.

Food safety in restaurants
The NRA comprises 970,000 restaurant and food service outlets in the U.S., covering a workforce of close to 13 million employees. The term food service also applies to any environment in which food is served, including sit-down restaurants, food trucks, college cafeterias, and more. If staff members handle or serve food, it is a food service establishment, which means they need to be aware of proper sanitation and hygiene guidelines.

“All food service environments need to be prudent about containing possible pathogens.”

Despite the wide variety of businesses and organizations that are in the food service industry, they all have one thing in common: the need to be prudent about containing possible pathogens and protecting employees and consumers from illnesses. Disposable gloves are among the first line of defense against foodborne illnesses like salmonella, as well as bacteria that may be transferred to food through contamination, such as E.coli or hepatitis A. That’s why the NRA’s NFSM event is so important: It helps food service organizations prevent foodborne pathogens.

Every year, NFSM designates five educational topics: one for each week in September. This year’s educational theme is “Let It Flow,” which focuses on the movement of food through the restaurant and preventing contamination issues at each stage. Here are the topics the month-long event will cover:

  • Week one: Receiving
  • Week two: Storage
  • Week three: Thawing and Holding
  • Week four: Preparation
  • Week five: Service

Food service establishments will learn each week about a different step and best practices to ensure the food remains safe to eat. At each stage, gloves help staff prevent contamination and cross-contamination of ingredients.

Gloves in food service
In addition to best practices offered by the NRA, the U.S. Food and  Drug Administration (FDA) has several rules regarding the necessity of gloves for food contact. These rules are in place to protect both workers in food processing and consumers.

  • Workers must minimize bare hand and arm contact with exposed food that is not ready to eat.
  • Gloves or utensils such as tongs and spatulas must be used for contact with exposed, ready-to-eat foods except when washing fruits and vegetables.
  • Gloves are used for a single task and must be discarded when workers switch to a new task, the gloves become soiled or the task is interrupted.
  • The FDA also requires all food processing employees wash their hands. This step reduces the chance of contamination because it prevents pathogens and other hazardous materials from touching the inside of the glove – one of many best practices for donning gloves.
“AMMEX gloves are excellent for food service applications.”

The right gloves for the right job
Food service positions, while they all require some sort of glove, involve handling different ingredients and kitchen equipment. Moreover, individual positions within the organization require unique gloves depending on the scope of the job. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and vinyl gloves are common throughout the industry because of their relatively low cost and the loose fit, which makes them easier to don and doff. These features are important in food service, where workers have to change gloves frequently.

Vinyl’s advantage over poly is that it conforms to the hand more closely, increasing dexterity. Employees are also able to obtain extra protection with AMMEX Anti-Microbial Vinyl Gloves, which have built in antimicrobial agents to prevent organisms from growing and help prevent cross-contamination.

However, food service establishments should not feel the need to limit themselves to vinyl. Other glove materials are equally useful in this industry. Why not consider a premium glove, such as nitrile or latex? Both materials provide superior dexterity, as well as greater puncture resistance vinyl.

AMMEX’s X3 Series provides a number of options for food service applications. This lineup includes the following gloves:

  • Xtreme X3 Nitrile Gloves: Microtexture enhances gripping power in wet and dry conditions, and these gloves provide three times the puncture resistance of latex. Xtreme X3 Nitrile Gloves also feature chemical resistance and are FDA approved for food service.
  • X3 Black Nitrile Gloves: These gloves have all the same benefits as X3 Nitrile, with a classic black color that provides a professional appearance.
  • GPX3 Vinyl Gloves: GPX3 Vinyl Gloves are low-cost and loose-fitting for light duty applications where employees change gloves repeatedly.
  • LX3 Latex Gloves: These latex gloves are lightweight, provide superior puncture resistance than vinyl and offer more elasticity than nitrile.

GPX3, X3, and BX3 gloves also come with a choice of 200 gloves per box, which adds up to 2000 gloves per case. Buying larger numbers of gloves at once means you spend less on packaging and replace boxes half as often.

No matter what the application or the needs of your staff, AMMEX has a glove that fits. Be sure to follow along with us through the month of September and show your support by using the has​htags #FoodSafetyMonth and #LetItFlow2015.

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Making the Grade: Posting Food Safety Scores


Consumers have become more concerned about what is in their food and how those products move from farm to table, and government regulators and restaurants around the world have stepped up to keep the public more informed about food safety. This trend is evident through posted food safety scores, which are becoming more visible to consumers.

The public wants to be in the know
Many of today’s consumers are cautious about the steps taken to process and serve their food. Food safety is of growing importance as indicated by widespread protests over genetically modified organisms, calls for improved labeling to detail nutrition facts and the public’s penchant for reading research about food processing to become savvier consumers.

“Food safety scores are becoming more visible to consumers.”

At the restaurant level, establishments are providing the details of their food safety inspections. Not only are consumers happy to have this information, they want to see comprehensive scores. In fact, a crowdfunded study commissioned by Dine Safe King County and conducted by researchers from the University of Washington’s Human Centered Design Department showed consumers want more than an overall pass/fail rating – they desire to see an itemized list of where restaurants are missing the mark.

With this trend in mind, how have regulators and members of food service industry responded?

How inspectors score restaurants
Local health departments assign food safety scores in various ways. These ratings are numerical, pass/fail or denoted with a letter-based grade. New York City, for example, evaluates restaurants using a points system, and point ranges correspond to a letter grade. Each violation accumulates more points, so to earn a passing grade, restaurants want as few points as possible.

To be transparent about these ratings, restaurants publish their scores. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services noted this includes posting the score or the entire report in the establishments.

Lawmakers in San Mateo County, California, implemented a new program to make these posted ratings easier for consumers to understand. This program will color code the score placards to match traffic signals: green means a restaurant passed, yellow indicates a conditional pass and red denotes a closed restaurant.

 

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Global Trends in Food Processing


Food processing facilities follow the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) rules, but these food safety guidelines are the bare minimum facilities undertake to prevent contamination. In addition to HACCP, these facilities follow rules regarding high- and low-care (or high- and low-risk) areas.

High- and low-care areas establish physical barriers against contamination and relate to anything that creates a process, such as washing, salting and cooking. This not only applies to personal protective equipment (PPE), but also the facility itself. The regulations designate clear start and end points for different parts of the processing supply chain to prevent microbial growth and other types of contamination.

Here is an overview of how high- and low-care areas work:

What are high- and low-care areas?
When employing these guidelines, each facility has its own standards. However, one factor remains constant: As food products move further up the supply chain, the control standards become more strict. Essentially, as food goes from farm to table, it will move from low- to high-care areas.

“As food goes from farm to table, it will move from low- to high-care areas.”

As implied by the name, low-care areas require a lower standard of hygiene than high-care segments of a facility. Although food products in these areas may have contact with the environment, they are not at risk for additional contamination, according to Food Safety Magazine. Food processing steps to be completed in low-care areas include receiving, preparing and cooking food.

High-care areas have the utmost hygiene standards. Furthermore, these sections of the facility are temperature-controlled.

Before entering either of these areas, workers must change into the appropriate PPE at designated changing stations and wash their hands throughout the process. In the case of equipment moving between areas, these tools must undergo sanitation procedures.

How do facilities delineate high- and low-care areas?
Several factors establish the barriers between different sections of a food processing facility. These include installations and PPE, according to the British Retail Consortium’s Global Standards.

For the physical structure, a few features are present in both areas but more extensive in high-care sections: entrances; filtration systems to remove dust, microorganisms and airborne particles; and color coded floor markings. Color coding also applies to PPE, tools used for processing and appliances.

The physical segregation also includes transfer points. These are places in the facilities between low- and high-care areas where employees must complete certain steps to prevent contamination. Before workers or equipment pass from one area to the other, they must undergo the aforementioned hygiene and sanitation procedures in the transfer point. In some factories, employees cannot move between low- and high-care areas under any circumstances.

“As part of the segregation measures for low- and high-care areas, employees must wash their hands before moving from one area to the other.”

How do facilities establish a flow to prevent contamination?
Food processing plants have certain guidelines and layouts to further ensure activities in low-care areas do not affect high-care sections.

Drainage is one key concern. Any drainage systems in the facility must flow from a high-care area to a low-care area. This ensures no contaminates, such as blood from livestock, flow into a high-care section and come into contact with cooked foods.

Another aspect of flow is the cooking process. Because foods are raw when they begin cooking in a low-care area, BRC’s standards require double doors on cooking ovens for thorough segregation of cooked and uncooked food products. While some facilities use single-door ovens, they put additional sanitation measures in place to prevent contamination in lieu of a second physical barrier.

What is the global perspective?
More foods are processed now compared to previous years, which raises the chances that part of the supply chain takes place in another country. Not only does this refer to steps in the process, but it also applies to where the ingredients come from.

Different countries have varying degrees of regulation for food processing, and the U.S. has less intense rules compared to Europe and Asia. For instance, the European Union enforces good hygiene practices (GHP), which include extensive training to make certain food processing employees prevent contamination, in addition to HACCP. As shown through regulations regarding low- and high-care areas, HACCP, GHP and other food safety guidelines, increased scrutiny and care of food processing and food safety are growing globally.

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Gear up for St. Patrick’s Day


St. Patrick’s Day is right around the corner, and you should stock up on disposable gloves in addition to green apparel, decorations and beer. Gloves will be out in force as much as the parade-goers March 17 – and the day after.

Many revelers will be dying or painting hair, paper mache decorations and other items green, and they need gloves to keep the chemical dyes off their hands.

After getting their emerald apparel and decorations together, many Americans will have a hankering for corned beef and cabbage, keeping restaurants and pubs across the nation busy on St. Patrick’s day. As customers crowd into these venues, food service workers will need an ample supply of barrier protection on hand.

While corned beef and cabbage is a staple of St. Paddy’s Day cuisine, it is not the only common sight around the holiday. Many cities, food service venues and others will be cleaning up after all the festivities and will need ample supplies of gloves for the task. For instance, Chicago, which has an iconic celebration that includes dying the Chicago river green, expects 500,000 people to attend the festivities, according to Medill Reports Chicago, and cleanup crews will need the right supplies, including gloves, to pick up behind the revelers.

Many will claim the luck of the Irish on St. Patrick’s Day, but certain things should not be left to chance. Make sure you have the gloves you need.

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Valentine’s Day: For the Love of Food Safety


Did you know economists predict Americans will spend $1.7 billion on candy this Valentine’s Day? That finding comes from the National Retail Federation and indicates a large need for disposable gloves in the food industry as the holiday of love approaches.

In addition to buying their sweethearts stuffed animals and roses, many consumers will shell out for chocolates, candy hearts and other holiday-themed treats. Plus, restaurants across the nation will be packed with couples looking to express their love over a nice meal.

With food processing and food service workers kicking into high gear in the days before and on the holiday, they will need extra gloves for increased production. This can be especially true in restaurants, where many chefs will be finding creative ways to hide engagement rings in desserts.

Food service workers already go through at least 20 pairs of gloves on average for a normal business day, so imagine what they will use on Valentine’s Day. Whether its preparing an array of heart-shaped entrees or packing the billions of conversation hearts the National Confectioner’s Association says manufacturers produce each year, show consumers some love by stocking up on disposable gloves.

For more information, follow this link.

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