Why Nitrile Gloves are Best for Dairy Farming


Disposable gloves have many uses in agriculture, especially when it comes to dairy farming. Nitrile gloves, for example, are perfect for this application.

According to Progressive Dairyman, gloves have experienced increased usage in this industry over the past ten years. This is because of a need for improved worker and animal health – not to mention, a desire to produce higher-quality milk. In fact, nearly 50 percent of all dairy farms use gloves because of these reasons.

Nitrile gloves in particular provide several benefits:

  • Cleaner milk due to less bacteria transferred from hands to the milk, as the bacteria does not adhere to the nitrile as easily as to the crevices of your hands
  • Protection against repeated exposure to teat dips
  • Superior resistance to iodine used to prevent contamination between cows, a resistance not found with latex gloves

Progressive Dairyman noted this sanitation practice is crucial for dairy farms. If cows become infected, they represent lost revenue. This problem becomes worse if an infection spreads between cows. Rather than risking lost profits and low-quality milk, dairy farmers should be sure to replenish their nitrile glove supplies to get the appropriate level of barrier protection.

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AMMEXWhy Nitrile Gloves are Best for Dairy Farming
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Disposable Glove Usage: Industrial Safety and Chemical


Did you know the industrial, safety and chemical industries had the highest disposable glove revenue, on par with the medical and dental industry in 2012? Not only was this sector the top contender for industrial markets that year, analysts project it will continue to have the second highest overall revenue by 2022.

While industrial safety is a broad area, one need remains key: chemical protection. This is why nitrile gloves account for 65 percent of the glove material distribution in this industry.

Considering the American Burn Association said 3 percent of hospital admissions for burns from 2003 to 2012 were for chemical burns, and 9 percent of all burns were occupational, workers in the industrial and safety industry are vital potential customers for nitrile and other glove materials that offer chemical resistance.

 

AMMEX-Disposable-Gloves-Market-Growth

 

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Disposable Glove Growth Opportunities in the JanSan Industry


With regard to disposable glove revenue, the janitorial-sanitation industry has one of the lowest figures, but that does not mean it is not a target market for distributors. In fact, the Jan-san industry has the second-highest revenue growth potential of all sectors, indicating the market is ripe for expansion.

Jan-san employees use gloves for various reasons, including protection from harsh chemicals and pathogens. Additionally, they use an average of 15 pairs per day, which is on par with the usage rates in the medical, dental and food processing industries.

With the potential for vinyl, nitrile and latex glove sales, distributors do not want to miss out on the many sales opportunities in the jan-san industry.

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AMMEXDisposable Glove Growth Opportunities in the JanSan Industry
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The Many Uses for Gloves in a Facility


There are various types of facilities, each of which having numerous applications that require disposable gloves. Within these facilities, numerous tasks – some core to the business and other supporting – are undertaken, and each of these instances requires a certain level of protection.

Here are some examples of activities at large facilities and how gloves are be beneficial to each:

  • Cleaning and janitorial staff: These workers need gloves for protection from the harsh chemicals in the cleaning supplies they use. Additionally, they must protect themselves from pathogens while sanitizing restrooms. Nitrile or vinyl gloves are used for these workers, as nitrile holds up to harsh chemicals, and vinyl is perfect for many glove changes between tasks.
  • Childcare: Some facilities have childcare services for employees on site. Daycare employees wear gloves as a protective barrier for themselves and the children. Gloves are donned for diaper changes, cleaning up messes, cleaning toys and feeding children.
  • First aid: This is another area where gloves serve as a protective barrier between wearers and the individuals. Nitrile exam gloves, for example, safeguard employees administering first aid against bloodborne pathogens and other diseases and are latex free.
  • Cafeteria: Three glove types are used in this area. Vinyl gloves appear in food production, poly gloves are used in food service and nitrile gloves are donned for heavier-duty, longer-period use. Many facilities prefer the use of antimicrobial vinyl gloves as an added layer of protection.
“When maintenance workers at industrial manufacturing facilities repair machines and fleet vehicles, they should protect their hands with disposable gloves.”
  • Line workers, assembler and fabricators: Workers on a factory floor handle harmful materials and substances. In battery manufacturing and processing plants, for example, lead is present during the manufacturing process. Employees who are exposed to these risks need protection for their hands while they work. Nitrile gloves, which are made of a highly chemically resistant synthetic rubber, are a suitable choice. Plus, they conform more closely to the hand as they are warmed by body heat, which allows for additional dexterity.
  • Maintenance: This area includes repairs to machinery used for manufacturing processes and to a facility’s fleet of transport vehicles. Maintenance workers come into contact with grease, gasoline and other solvents and need protection for their hands as they make repairs.
  • Packaging: Workers in this part of the manufacturing process are also subject to food safety regulations if foodstuffs and other consumables are being packaged. Furthermore, glove usage preserves the integrity of the packaging by preventing fingerprints.
  • Printing workers: Industrial printers use chemicals to produce printed labels and other items for their products. These chemicals include emulsions, inks, oxidizers and solvents. Disposable gloves protect workers’ hands from health risks, such as nervous system damage, that occur through skin absorption. Due to these chemical hazards, nitrile gloves are the solution in this case.
  • Security guards: These employees conduct inspections of other workers and need to wear gloves when doing so. Gloves protect security guards against contracting illnesses from persons they come in physical contact with.
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The Right Gloves for the Job: Part V Agricultural


In the agricultural industry, workers are involved in a number of tasks where gloves serve as a protective barrier. These duties include working with livestock, handling chemicals such a herbicides and disinfectants and dealing with contaminated soil.

With regard to herbicides and insecticides, there are hundreds of varieties that are used in agriculture, each with chemicals that can be harmful to humans. Furthermore, it is important that personal protective equipment is used to reduce or eliminate exposure to these chemicals.

In the dairy farming sector, glove use has become more common in recent years. Gloves help prevent the spread of bacteria, which is key for dairy farming, as a sick animal is unproductive until it can be brought back to health.

There are various zoonotic diseases, which are those transmitted from animals to humans. One example is brucellosis, a disease that is caused by a bacteria known as brucella and primarily affects animals. However, humans can contract brucellosis if they come in contact with infected animals or animal products. Additionally, livestock handlers need to ensure they are not passing diseases from infected animals to healthy animals.

Workers also need protection when repairing and maintaining their fleet equipment. Whether tractors or combine harvesters, the machines contain chemicals that can cause health issues if they get onto a worker’s hands and absorb through the skin.

“With these risks, agricultural employees need a glove that can stand up to harsh chemicals and bacteria. Nitrile gloves protect agricultural workers from harmful chemicals in pesticides.”

Nitrile and latex gloves for chemicals and pesticides
Agriculture is currently trending toward lighter weight nitrile gloves which offer durability and chemical and pesticide resistance at a competitive price.Nitrile, a synthetic rubber, provides the best overall chemical resistance. Agricultural workers who spend their days spraying pesticides on crops have the risk that they could get the chemicals on their hands which could be absorbed through the skin. Nitrile gloves provide protection that will not easily break down when it comes into contact with harsh chemicals. This protection is also beneficial for guarding against the many fluids that workers can come into contact with while they are performing maintenance on vehicles.

Latex gloves are the second most-common glove in agriculture. These gloves are also donned when workers are dealing with pesticide residues. When handling plants and plant products, workers use latex gloves to protect themselves even if there are not visible signs of pesticides.  While latex previously was the most-used glove type in agriculture, nitrile gloves have become more popular.

Vinyl gloves for tending livestock
When it comes to tending livestock, vinyl gloves are a more suitable option compared to other glove materials, particularly for tasks that require several glove changes in a short time. Vinyl is an inexpensive material that is perfect for short-duration tasks as workers move from animal to animal to prevent cross contamination. Vinyl gloves are common in breeding applications.

Regardless of the application, it is important to remember gloves are not solely for safeguarding workers and livestock. They also protect government and private inspectors. These parties should also don the appropriate gloves to guard themselves and livestock they inspect and ensure the integrity of agricultural facilities.

AMMEXThe Right Gloves for the Job: Part V Agricultural
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The Right Janitorial Gloves for the Job: Part IV JanSan


Workers in the janitorial and sanitation industry need the protection of disposable gloves to guard against various health and safety risks.  The primary hazard these employees encounter is the very chemicals they use to clean. According to the Hawaii Department of Health, six out of every 100 professional janitors suffer chemical-related injuries, which include burns to the skin. Various harmful chemicals can be found in glass, metal and other cleaners, including hydrofluoric acid, nitrilotriacetate, and phosphoric acid.

The second hazard is contact with bloodborne pathogens. According to the California Department of Industrial Relations, this risk includes on-the-job transmission of germs. Transmission can occur if janitorial staff members come into contact with infected bodily fluids on soiled surfaces, sanitary napkins or tissues.

Considering these risks, janitorial employees need a barrier to protect themselves. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Dunn and Bradstreet and AMMEX Corporation showed disposable glove revenue in the janitorial industry reached nearly $200 million in 2012 while experiencing 30 percent average annual growth, indicating the need for comprehensive protection.

Furthermore, janitorial staff members need to switch gloves between tasks. If they are cleaning toilets in a facility, for instance, they should don a new pair of gloves before they clean sinks to avoid transferring pathogens and chemicals from the toilets to the sinks. Janitorial employees use many harmful chemicals, which is one reason they should wear gloves while they work.

With these considerations in mind, here are some of the glove materials typically used in the janitorial industry:

Vinyl
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC), or vinyl, gloves are the most commonly used janitorial gloves in SanJan applications. These gloves are an inexpensive alternative to latex and nitrile gloves.

Vinyl gloves can be purchased in powdered or powder-free and exam- or industrial-grade variations. This gives janitorial staff members options to find the right level of protection for their work environments. Exam-grade gloves, for example, are for applications involving exposure to bodily fluids and go through special testing at the factory level that is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

With regard to chemical resistance, vinyl gloves are recommended for protection against various substances. They can withstand hydrofluoric, phosphoric and 10 percent concentrated nitric acid, among other chemicals typically present in janitorial applications. Always confirm by conducting chemical resistance on-site testing of any glove before use.

For guarding against bacteria, there are antimicrobial vinyl gloves. These products have additional protection in the glove material to prevent the growth of microorganisms by disrupting cell walls.

 “Vinyl gloves can withstand hydrofluoric, phosphoric and 10 percent concentrated nitric acids, among other chemicals typically present in janitorial applications.”

 Nitrile and latex
These two glove materials are also used for janitorial applications.

Nitrile gloves provide superior chemical resistance, standing up to harmful solvents such as 38 percent concentrated hydrochloric acid, 2-butoxyethanol and sodium hypochlorite. As always, perform on-site chemical resistance testing of any glove before use. These latex-free gloves are made from a durable synthetic rubber that is extremely puncture and tear resistant and perfect for heavier duty tasks.

Natural rubber latex gloves also stand up to many of the chemicals that are present in the janitorial industry and provide tear and puncture resistance. These attributes are perfect for addressing the specific needs of this industry, but latex gloves are not as widely used because many people have latex allergies due to the rubber’s proteins. Additionally, repeated exposure to the material can lead someone to develop a latex allergy. Reactions can range from dermatitis to anaphylaxis.

With these considerations in mind, vinyl gloves are the most cost-effective option for janitorial employees.  If you sell to janitorial industries but do not yet sell gloves, become an AMMEX distributor today to maximize this opportunity for growth.” 

AMMEXThe Right Janitorial Gloves for the Job: Part IV JanSan
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