Chemical Resistance in Disposable Gloves


When working with certain abrasive chemicals, you need to understand the chemical resistance in disposable gloves and the protection that particular glove materials offer. In addition, length of exposure, conditions and chemical concentration impact the performance of the glove.

Consider degradation and breakthrough time
Gloves are rated on how well they withstand exposure to a certain chemical. Though there is not a standardized test, strength is typically scored by exposing the material to a test chemical. As a glove degrades, it may swell, wrinkle, get stiff or change color. In general, degradation determines whether a glove material is a good fit for a specific application.

In addition to degradation, gloves must be tested for permeation and breakthrough time if a chemical causes specific degradation to latex, nitrile or vinyl. Breakthrough time is the length of time between the initial contact with a chemical and when residue is detected on the inner side of the glove, which indicates how long workers are able to safely where the glove for barrier protection. Permeation is the way a chemical passes through a material on a molecular level without entering through the gloves’ pores, pinholes or other visible openings.

“Nitrile gloves have superior chemical resistance against common chemicals as well as many specialty chemicals, such as water treatment chemicals or industrial cleaning compounds.”

Understanding the conditions of glove use
With any type of glove, the length of exposure and concentration of the chemical may determine how resistant it is. For any intended use, it’s crucial to do on-site testing with any gloves so workers know how to protect themselves, especially if the facility uses chemical mixtures. Gloves are often tested for resistance to one chemical, but they may not be rated against specific mixtures.

For instance, AMMEX Gloveworks Latex Gloves offer barrier protection for food service, health care, dentistry, janitorial and industrial applications. Latex gloves offer secure protection against a variety of chemicals, but latex breaks down over time with continued exposure to certain chemicals, such as ethyl acetate, paint remover and rubber solvent. Latex is resistant to acetone, which may make these gloves a good fit for nail salons, especially compared to other materials.

Nitrile gloves may be better suited for automotive applications because they are more resistant to many of the chemicals used in this type of work such as gasoline and brake fluid. However, for any glove choice, it’s crucial to consider the resistance to specific chemicals that are used on the job.

Distributors who would like to learn more about available product materials, thicknesses and sizes to meet their needs should speak with their AMMEX sales representative or contact us on our website for more information.

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All about Allergies: Part 2 Synthetics


Natural rubber latex disposable gloves typically get most of the attention when it comes to allergies, but allergic reactions are also possible with synthetic glove materials like nitrile butadiene rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC or vinyl). While allergies to these materials themselves are uncommon, the chemicals used in the production processes are common causes.

During the production of nitrile and vinyl gloves, manufacturers use various substances to turn the base ingredients into the final glove materials. These chemicals are in both the process to form the actual PVC and nitrile and to turn these materials into gloves.

To create vinyl, for example, petroleum is used in the manufacturing process. Petroleum is used to create naphtha, which is combined with other chemicals to form ethylene. The ethylene is combined with chlorine, and through two more transformations, this combination becomes polyvinyl chloride.

Allergy tiggers
With latex gloves, the allergic reactions usually stem from the proteins in the latex. With synthetics, the issue lies with the petroleum. While rare, petroleum allergies do occur in some individuals.

As a result of contact with the glove materials, individuals with petroleum allergies experience contact dermatitis, which may lead to skin irritation, hives, redness and blistering in more extreme cases. Respiratory effects, such as throat itching, coughing and wheezing, appear with allergic reactions to petroleum gas but not commonly with petroleum-based gloves.

“If certain individuals wear a glove that is too-tight, the skin will not be able to breathe inside the glove which may cause an irritation.”

Acknowledging indirect causes of irritation
Although petroleum allergies are rare, some nitrile and vinyl glove wearers will experience contact dermatitis. However, this reaction does not always occur because of the glove materials.

One common issue is an irritative substance on the hands. Certain substances, such as residual hand soap or a scented lotion, will not cause too much of a problem on an exposed hand, but the associated reaction to it will be more pronounced in some individuals when they have a glove pressing the substance to their skin.

This issue is more evident when a glove is too small. Overall, too-tight gloves create irritation and discomfort as the skin is unable to breathe inside the glove.

Key points about glove material allergies
Whether it is latex, nitrile or vinyl, glove users must ensure they have the right gloves for the job. This applies to selecting the right material for the application as well as the appropriate size.

Additionally, as individuals and employers attempt to accommodate allergies, they must also consider how the alternative glove materials will fare in their work environments.  For a wide variety of glove options ranging in material, thickness, and sizing contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to learn more.

AMMEXAll about Allergies: Part 2 Synthetics
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All about Allergies: Part 1 Latex


Latex allergies have serious consequences for health care and industrial workers as well as patients. Individuals experience a range of reactions from coming into contact with latex, including contact dermatitis and anaphylaxis, which is life-threatening. These reactions stem from the natural rubber latex proteins. Although latex gloves provide the best fit and feel, they are not the right choice for those with latex sensitivities. It’s crucial for people who come into contact with latex to understand the symptoms of a reaction.

What are latex allergies?
An immediate reaction after contact with latex is an indication of an allergy. This type of response to latex triggers the immune system, causing sneezing, a runny nose, coughing or wheezing and an itchy throat or eyes. Repeated exposure may cause people with only minor reactions to progress to anaphylaxis over time.

This reaction is triggered by latex proteins, which come from natural rubber. Many latex gloves are powdered, and the food-grade cornstarch powder transfers the proteins to the skin. The powder also spreads proteins to the eyes and throat.

“Health care workers are at an increased risk for latex sensitivity as latex is the most common glove used in that industry.”

Employees who work with latex products frequently may develop allergic reactions. This is especially common in the health care sector and rubber factories. People who have had 10 or more surgeries, food allergies or a family history of allergies are at a heightened risk.

While some people are born with latex allergies, many individuals have sensitivities that become more severe with repeated exposure. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, 50 percent of people with latex allergy have a history of another type of allergy.

What are the symptoms of a reaction?
One of the most common reactions to latex is contact dermatitis, which is irritation or dryness of the skin. Delayed contact dermatitis often appears 12 to 36 hours after using a latex product, and the symptoms include red, scaly or itchy skin. Anyone who uses latex gloves may experience this reaction, but it does not mean they are allergic. Because there is a wide range of reactions to latex and they may get more severe over time, it’s important to check with a doctor or allergist to determine the true cause of a reaction.

Anaphylaxis is life-threatening because the reaction isn’t limited to one part of the body. People may experience difficulty breathing, red rashes, itchiness, swollen throat, chest tightness and trouble swallowing. This type of reaction may even cause someone to lose consciousness. Anaphylaxis typically occurs between 5-30 minutes of coming into contact with an allergen. While only 1 percent of the global population experiences anaphylaxis, latex is a common cause.

When reactions aren’t latex allergies
Contact dermatitis has multiple causes and not all are related to allergies. For example, medical professionals wash their hands frequently, leading to dryness. In addition, gloves trap soap, moisture or lotion against the skin, which sometimes causes irritation, especially when people don’t have the right glove size. Moreover, contact dermatitis sometimes happens because of incomplete hand drying or the friction of the glove powder rubbing against the skin.

Delayed hypersensitivity is often caused by the chemicals used to manufacture the gloves rather than the latex proteins. Antioxidants, emulsifiers, stabilizers and stiffeners cause severe contact dermatitis within two days after exposure for some people, and the reaction spreads to other areas such as the face in some cases. People with immediate hypersensitivity should avoid all exposure to latex in hopes of preventing a latex allergy.

Chronic contact dermatitis and delayed hypersensitivity are usually limited to the area of contact, but individuals with recurring reactions should see a doctor, dermatologist or allergist to confirm. Chronic contact dermatitis may be indicative of a different allergy.

The global perspective
As countries develop, glove usage is becoming more common in health systems around the world. The primary type of glove is latex, and allergies are occurring more frequently because of repeated exposure. The U.S. and other developed nations have started to use alternatives to latex, and other countries may need to follow suit.

Viable latex alternatives
AMMEX Corporation offers a full line of latex and synthetic exam-grade gloves to suit whatever needs you have. AMMEX Nitrile Exam Gloves are an excellent alternative to latex and have many benefits, such as greater tear resistance. Additionally, AMMEX Vinyl Exam Gloves are a cost-effective alternative to latex.

AMMEXAll about Allergies: Part 1 Latex
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High Visibility Sales Results with Orange Nitrile!


The first thing you will most likely notice about Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves is their bright, unique color. Although AMMEX Corporation is well-known for black nitrile gloves, orange nitrile gloves bring something new to the table and are perfect for agricultural, automotive, industrial safety and manufacturing applications, among many others.

Why should you go orange?
Orange nitrile gloves do not just look unique; the color stands out so you are more aware of where you hands are at all times, making them an excellent part of a personal protective equipment (PPE) or high-visibility program. The contrast of the color with dark environments makes workers less likely to be injured. The bright orange stands out against dim work areas, such as industrial environments, garages and under the hoods of vehicles.

Successful PPE programs require collaboration between employers and employees to conduct hazard assessments in their workplaces and minimize risks. Employees must be trained to be aware of hazards and properly wear PPE. Protective gear that is comfortable and easy to don makes employees more likely to utilize it. The orange nitrile gloves have a beaded cuff to prevent ripping and tearing at the base, which makes them easier to put on. In addition, the texture and durability of these gloves do not interfere with the comfort. Nitrile gloves conform to the hands as they are warmed with body heat and are more elastic than vinyl, making them more comfortable for longer use.

“Orange nitrile gloves stand out in dark work environments.”

Other features that will make you want to go orange
The raised diamond texture of the orange nitrile gloves gives them a superior grip. In addition, they are thicker for better durability, which makes them three times as resistant to punctures as latex. Plus, the added thickness increases the gloves’ resistance to harsh chemicals. Wearers are able to safely work with iodine, butane and pesticides for longer without having to change gloves. This helps you save money by using fewer gloves. The bright color also means no more lost gloves in the dark. In addition, the orange matches other brightly colored protective equipment.

Our Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves are available in sizes medium to extra extra large and measure 9.5 inches from base to fingertip. They are sold in boxes of 100 gloves with 10 boxes to a case.

Contact your AMMEX representative or contact us on our website to add these gloves to your product line. If you would like to become a distributor, contact us for more information.

AMMEXHigh Visibility Sales Results with Orange Nitrile!
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March Madness Team Latex

 While a team full of young guns can bring a new pace and finesse to the court, veteran squads like AMMEX’s X3 series Team Latex have been playing the barrier protection game for years. These latex gloves are the oldest of all the teams in our March Madness lineup but do not think their skills have dwindled with age.  Here is our starting lineup for March Madness Team Latex

HD Industrial and HD Exam Latex
These two players are cut from the same cloth – both are able to stay in the game for longer because of their thickness. The HD Industrial latex gloves and HD Exam latex disposable gloves are twins, with the former playing best within the industrial sector and the latter dominating the medical industry. Plus, when it comes to fit and feel, these two latex gloves are all-stars.

“March Madness Team Latex is full of veteran players.”

Gloveworks Heavy Duty Latex is an industrial grade glove that is more than twice as thick as a standard disposable latex glove. With enhanced puncture resistance, each glove has a longer duration of use so you don’t have to switch gloves as often during tough jobs. Latex gloves feature more elasticity than nitrile, and better puncture resistance than vinyl. The textured surface of the glove will give you an enhanced grip in wet and dry conditions. It’s also powder free, so you don’t have to worry about messy powder residue.

AMMEX Heavy Duty Latex Exam Gloves are powder free featuring a smooth interior for easy donning and a textured surface for an outstanding grip. These latex gloves are twice as strong as standard disposable gloves. AMMEX HD latex disposable gloves are perfect for your more demanding tasks and are commonly used for medical and dental applications, food processing, janitorial, and in laboratory settings.

LX3 
If you want that player that can move around the court and provide exceptional dexterity, AMMEX’s X3 series have the skills you need, including the LX3 Latex gloves. They are thinner than their teammates, providing more tactile sensitivity and a full range of motion. Also, these gloves come with a polymer coating for easier donning. X3 is an all around solid contender on the court.

AMMEX LX3 Latex disposable gloves are well suited for all industrial applications where excellent dexterity and comfort is required. These gloves are commonly used for painting, janitorial, manufacturing and food service.  LX3 latex is also more elastic than nitrile and features excellent chemical resistance against various acids and bases.  LX3 industrial latex disposable gloves feature a fully textured palm and fingertips providing a strong grip in wet or dry conditions.

“Boost your Brackets with Team Latex”

While some will see their brackets fall to pieces, others will play to win. Why take a gamble when the perfect barrier protection is your best bet?Contact us to today to become a distributor and add Team Latex to your player line-up!

AMMEXMarch Madness Team Latex
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March Madness: Team Nitrile


Sometimes, the game calls for aggressive players, and for March Madness: Team Nitrile delivers the “Xtreme” intensity needed to command the court. These gloves play hard in the paint to provide exceptional barrier protection, with the best chemical and tear resistance among all glove materials.

Here is our starting lineup for March Madness:  Team Nitrile:

Orange nitrile


These are the most aggressive gloves on the team. With a raised diamond texture to provide superior grip, no oily defenders are stripping the ball or tools away from them. Plus, Orange Nitrile Gloves provide superior chemical resistance to stay in the game longer in automotive, industrial safety and other applications.

Black nitrile


These gloves have long served as the star player of Team Nitrile, putting both AMMEX and the team on the map. One fan said her favorite feature of Black Nitrile Gloves is the sleek color that “conceals dirt, grease, and grime!”

Indigo nitrile


If you need a glove that will box out harmful pathogens or drive to the hole against tough chemicals, then you want Indigo Nitrile Gloves. These gloves play on any court, from the medical to industrial sectors and anything in between. They are also great for tattoo parlors.

Xtreme nitrile


Some gloves play to win and others play to dominate. If you are looking for disposable gloves that will deliver a landslide victory every time, go with Team Nitrile. AMMEX Xtreme nitrile series are ideal for safety and hygiene against a wide variety of opponents. Pick from our Xtreme Extra Long gloves for added protection or Xtreme Green for an easily identifiable target.

AMMEX is a premier importer and distributor of high-quality disposable gloves and barrier protection products. Established in 1988, AMMEX grew into a multinational corporation with offices in the United States, Philippines, China, and Malaysia. We support our AMMEX wholesale distributors with quality products, outstanding service, competitive prices, and proven marketing support to grow their glove sales. Today, AMMEX proudly supplies a wide selection of disposable gloves and personal protection equipment to thousands of distributors in a variety of industries. Whether your clients are in food service, janitorial, medical or automotive, AMMEX has the disposable gloves you need.  Contact us to today become a distributor and add nitrile gloves to your bracket!

 

AMMEXMarch Madness: Team Nitrile
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March Madness: Team Vinyl


Do you want a disposable glove lineup with the balanced stats you need to score a bucket for barrier protection every time? If so, look no further than Team Vinyl. These gloves know how to play the game from inside and beyond the arc as well as on offense and defense to keep harmful chemicals and pathogens at bay.

Here is our starting lineup for Team Vinyl:

“The star players for Team Vinyl are great for food service and janitorial-sanitation applications.”

Antimicrobial
This player is all about containing the offense, as it inhibits the growth of microorganisms. Antimicrobial Vinyl Gloves, which are a fan favorite in food service and janitorial-sanitation, help prevent cross-contamination by double teaming pathogens on the court.

Stretch synthetic
These gloves, which are also great for food service, have the feel and fit of latex without the allergy concerns. Plus, Stretch Synthetic Vinyl Gloves are a low-cost solution, leaving more in your wallet to bet on brackets.

Blue vinyl
When the defense has a player wrapped up, it can be hard to see an open player for the pass. That is not the case with Blue Vinyl Gloves. With the vibrant color, you will always be able to spot a glove.

With Team Vinyl, you get an all-around lineup of barrier protection superstars.

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March Madness: Team Poly


March Madness is about to begin, and some of the best disposable gloves are ready to make a slam dunk for barrier protection. The first team on the brackets is Team Poly. 

These gloves are known for having a strong bench, with many fresh gloves waiting to be called into the game when a current pair is worn out. This makes them great for food service, where gloves are changed frequently for short duration tasks.

Here’s our starting lineup for Team Poly:

“Stretch synthetic and traditional poly are the all stars of Team Poly.”

Stretch Synthetic
Stretch Synthetic Poly Gloves are the starting point guard for Team Poly because they offer exceptional dexterity compared to regular poly gloves. Plus, they have a light texture for great grip.

“These gloves have combined unique characteristics of conforming fit in a low cost poly glove,” one commentator said.

These features make the Stretch Synthetic Poly Glove a star player.

Traditional Poly
Traditional Poly Gloves score points by focusing on the fundamentals, but this does not mean they do not stand out on the team, as they are heat sealed rather than dipped like other glove types. They also show off a little style with an embossed texture for additional grip.

Team Poly has the players to defend food products against cross-contamination.

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HACCP without the Hiccup


Disposable gloves come in a variety of colors, but this is not simply for wearer preferences. Some colors are more common in one industry than in another. Automotive technicians, for example, are fond of black nitrile gloves because the color seems suitable for their job, but the color has no bearing on the gloves’ usefulness.

In other industries, however, colors serve a greater purpose. This is because of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) rules.

“HACCP provides strict oversight at each step of food production.” 

What is HACCP?
This regulation includes a set of guidelines to ensure that food processing occurs in a safe manner from start to finish. HACCP provides strict oversight at each step of the production process to make certain consumers get food products without physical, chemical or microbiological risks. Using scientific and logical strategies, regulators identify hazards, put controls in place to limit those hazards and conduct tests to ensure those controls are effective.

This control method came from Pillsbury microbiologist Dr. Howard E. Bauman and other researchers in 1959. The company worked with NASA under contract to develop a food that would not crumble or contain pathogens or parasites in spacecraft with the astronauts. The formal presentation of HACCP came a little over a decade later in 1971 at the National Conference on Food Protection in Denver.

Through the years, HACCP grew from three principles to seven, reaching its current framework in 1992. The seven principles include:

  1. Conducting hard analyses: Plants identify hazards.
  2. Determining control points: This principle involves identifying steps in the production cycle where plants should implement preventative measures.
  3. Setting critical limits: Plants determine the extent to which they must control identified hazards.
  4. Implementing monitoring procedures for each control point: Plants establish procedures to ensure workers implement controls at control points.
  5. Creating corrective actions: If monitoring reveals critical limits are not met, plants must enforce corrective actions.
  6. Implementing record-keeping procedures: Plants must keep record of all information relating to the aforementioned principles.
  7. Verifying that HACCP is working effectively: The final principle ensures a plant’s HACCP plan works through inspections.

From its inception to now, HACCP has expanded to a number of industries, including canning and meat processing.

What does HACCP check?
While HACCP is a detailed process that implements numerous assessments and controls along the food processing cycle, it is not completely comprehensive. However, it does indicate food producers are taking the most extensive measures possible to ensure food safety.

The International HACCP Alliance noted the brunt of attention goes toward microbiological hazards, which require a microscope to detect and include listeria and E. coli. Chemical hazards, such as antibiotics and pesticides, are also present and feared by some consumers.

“Color coding gloves helps with HACCP compliance.”

Where do disposable gloves fit in?
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) already requires glove use in food processing, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires HACCP for meat processing plants in the U.S. Plus, HACCP is required for seafood and juice. With these controls already in place, some may wonder what else gloves will do to further assist in compliance.

That is where the colors become important. One of the biggest issues with food safety hazards is cross contamination. If workers do not change gloves between tasks, there is risk of a transfer of microorganisms. For example, contamination occurs if workers switch from working with raw meat, which contains harmful bacteria, to handling cooked meat. The same is true of the transition between cleaning and processing fruit, respectively. To address these issues, food producers use color coding for their disposable gloves.

Another example of a HACCP principle in use is of a plant that processes both meat and seafood. Blue vinyl gloves could designate seafood products, while managers could limit translucent vinyl gloves to meat. While a seemingly small difference, the color coding can go a long way toward ensuring workers remember to change gloves when switching between tasks.

HACCP includes a wide range of checks and balances, of which gloves are only a small part. However, they are no less important than any other preventative measures because they help reduce possible food recalls and improve food quality.

AMMEXHACCP without the Hiccup
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How Nitrile and Vinyl Gloves are Made


Unlike latex gloves, nitrile and vinyl gloves do not come from natural rubber. These gloves come from synthetic materials, but the manufacturing process is not too different from latex glove production.

Here is an overview of how manufacturers create these gloves:

Creating the synthetic materials
The processes for creating the nitrile and vinyl materials is similar.

The nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) used for nitrile gloves is a copolymer, which is a substance derived through the bonding of different molecules. In the case of NBR, the two parts are butadiene and acrylonitrile, which chemists combine using a process known as copolymerization. These molecules provide specific advantages for the gloves: Acrylonitrile enhances the chemical resistance, while butadiene creates flexibility and tear resistance.

Vinyl gloves come from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) monomers alone. Because chemists use only one species of monomer to create PVC, the material is known as a polymer. Once they have polymerized the substance, the chemists add a chemical called a plasticizer to the PVC. The plasticizer makes the material flexible – otherwise, the PVC would be rigid, as it is when used to form pipe. PVC is inexpensive to create, making it a cost-effective alternative to latex and for applications where glove changes occur frequently.

“Chemists combine molecules to create PVC and NBR for disposable gloves.  For easier donning, nitrile gloves undergo chlorination or polymer coating.”

Producing the gloves
Once the synthetic materials are available, they go to the factory for production. With a few exceptions, this process is mostly the same as the steps for manufacturing latex gloves:

  • The manufacturing equipment first runs ceramic, hand-shaped formers through water and bleach to clean them and remove any residue from the previous run. The formers then dry to remove all the water. Then, they dip in a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium nitrate, which helps the synthetic materials coagulate around the formers. Afterward, the formers dry again.
  • The equipment dips the formers in tanks full of NBR or PVC. The following step involves heating the materials at a high temperature to form the gloves as they dry.
  • For easier donning, nitrile gloves undergo one of two processes: chlorination or polymer coating. Chlorination involves exposing the gloves to chlorine – as an acid mixture or gas – to make the material harder and more slick. Polymer coating lubricates the glove surface by adding a layer of polymer.
  • Finally, in what is known as the stripping phase, the gloves are removed from the formers. This is called the stripping phase.

Checking for quality
The last steps of the manufacturing cycle include testing the gloves and shipping them.

The quality control process, which is based on standards from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ATSM) and regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), includes the pinhole leak test. While all gloves have some pinholes, this test tells manufacturers whether a glove has enough pinholes to lead to a noticeable leak.

After filling the gloves with 1 liter of water, the workers hang them upside down for two minutes to see if the gloves can hold the water. Exam-grade gloves undergo more intensive testing than industrial-grade gloves – the latter is composed of gloves that meet basic quality tests but not the higher standards for exam grading.

These tests adhere to acceptable quality limits (AQLs), which are percentages indicating how many gloves in a batch must fail the test to determine if the entire batch fails.

The final step is for workers to package and pack the gloves. Then, the gloves ship from the manufacturing facilitates in Southeast Asia via ocean freight to their final destinations. With this journey, the gloves have taken the final step from being molecules to effective barrier protection.

AMMEXHow Nitrile and Vinyl Gloves are Made
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