Overcoming Common Sales Objections


Regardless of what you are selling, you are going to face objections. Cold calling salespeople understand this and know they must have the skills to overcome counterarguments. This even holds true where free products and services are available as part of a promotion.

Salespeople must hammer out a process for addressing objections head on. However, while the representative is doing all the work and the endeavor ultimately seeks to sell a product or service, tackling objections is a client-focused experience. This is the foundation of the Feel, Felt, Found strategy in sales.

Feel: Show empathy
The first step in this process is listening and conveying understanding. Too often, salespeople will be focused on mentioning the next product feature that they will not take the time to actually hear why the potential client is initially uninterested. This hurts the interaction in two ways: the customer does not feel appreciated, and the salesperson is not highlighting benefits that directly address the specific objections.

One objection common to disposable gloves is that many prospective customers say they do not sell gloves. This is a much different response from a potential client who buys from another distributor, and salespeople must hone in on this difference.

Felt: Use relatable experiences
Many industries will see the same objections across leads, meaning sales teams will have a plethora of past experiences where they succeeded in overcoming objections. These stories tell future customers they are not the first people to have reservations, and they will not be the last people to see how the target products and services address those concerns.

“Salespeople can use the Feel, Felt, Found technique to overcome objections.”

A gloves salesperson could reference that many potential clients said they did not sell gloves until they found out 80 percent of their customers were getting gloves from somewhere else. This figure is typically a tipping point for uninterested leads.

Found: Bring out the value proposition
To seal the deal, salespeople must be specific about how those past clients found what they needed in the proposed product or service. AMMEX seeks to ensure all our distributors are able to grow sales by utilizing the Sales Acceleration Solution®, which includes gloves samples, marketing support and other tools to help them develop a fast-growing product line and attractive margins. For example, a past client saw its revenue increase once it began selling disposable gloves.

Now that you have the three components, what does this look like in a common situation? AMMEX seeks to ensure all our distributors are able to grow sales by utilizing the Sales Acceleration Solution®, which includes gloves samples, marketing support and other tools to help them develop a fast-growing product line and attractive margins. As our distributors begin using our Sales Acceleration Solution®, they may find clients who say they don’t use gloves. We suggest responding with:

I know how you feel. A few years ago, I didn’t’ use gloves for many of the applications I use them for today. I felt as though it wasn’t necessary. But what I’ve found is that the barrier protection gloves provide give me peace of mind that I am not being exposed to harmful chemicals and protecting myself. As a business owner, you can provide another component to your safety program for not a lot of extra cost. Would you like to try a sample of our gloves to see how they work for your application?

Along with the marketing support provided in our Sales Acceleration Solution®, AMMEX also offers a wide range of sales training support. Contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor. If you are already a distributor, speak with your salesperson to discover more about the services available to you.

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How Latex Gloves are Made


Natural rubber latex glove production is an interesting process that starts with nature and ends with comprehensive barrier protection. Each step along the way ensures the gloves are of the utmost quality when they arrive to distributors and end users.  Here is an overview of the production cycle from start to finish.  How latex gloves are made:

The harvesting phase
The process begins with the Hevea brasiliensis tree, which mostly grows in Southeast Asian countries like Vietnam, Thailand and Indonesia. Farmers extract the trees’ milky white latex sap from mature trees through a process called tapping. This occurs in the early morning, as the sap coagulates faster when temperatures rise later in the day. Farmers start by stripping bark from the tree at a downward curve. This directs the sap to a spile, which then allows the latex to drip into a cup affixed to the tree. Then, farmers boil the milky white latex to make it more concentrated, which gives the sap a consistency similar to syrup. Rubber trees are suitable for tapping for five years.

“Farmers remove latex from trees through a process called tapping.”

The production phase
Once farmers collect the sap, it goes to a factory for production. This phase includes several steps:

  • Preparing the latex: While latex gloves come from natural rubber latex, they are not 100 percent pure. This is because manufacturers combine the latex concentrate with a number of compounding chemicals during the initial step of the production process. This step enhances the latex’s properties, such as the elasticity, as well as stabilizes the material and its shelf life.
  • Cleaning the formers: To mold the latex into the shape of a glove, manufacturers use hand-shaped ceramic formers. The first task is to wash these formers by dipping them in water and then bleach. This ensures no residues are left from the previous batch. Afterward, formers dip into a chemical solution of calcium carbonate and calcium nitrate to help the latex stick.
  • Dipping in latex: Once the formers are ready, manufacturers dip them into a tank full of latex, with the length of time the former is immersed in the tank varying based on the desired glove thickness.
  • Vulcanizing the rubber: To ensure the rubber does not crack while drying, the formers enter an oven to dry and solidify. The development of the vulcanization process was integral to the creation of the latex rubber.
  • Leaching the gloves: This process involves dipping the gloves in water tanks and removing excess latex proteins to lower the risk of wearers having an allergic reaction and enhance the feel.
  • Beading the cuffs: Once the gloves are done with leaching, the manufacturers roll the cuffs to make the gloves easier to remove. The gloves may undergo leaching again after beading.
  • Applying powder: If the gloves are powdered, they enter a wet food-grade cornstarch powder slurry. Afterward, manufacturers dry the gloves again.
  • Chlorinating or polymer coating the gloves: If the gloves are powder free, they undergo alternative processes to facilitate easier donning. The first is chlorination, which makes the latex less tacky. The second involves coating the gloves with a polymer, which makes the surface smoother.
  • Stripping the gloves: Once the gloves are finished, workers remove them from the formers by hand.

“Medical-grade gloves are subject to more rigorous testing.”

The quality control phase
To ensure the gloves are of the highest quality, manufacturers test them. Workers test gloves using methods from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ATSM), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates these standards. The pinhole leak test is one of these methods. Workers first fill the gloves with one liter of water. Then, they close and hang the gloves to check for leaks.

The tests adhere to guidelines regarding acceptable quality limits (AQLs). These standards designate a percentage to evaluate a batch of gloves. If a batch’s failed gloves exceed this percentage of the total batch, all the gloves in that batch fail.

The results of these tests determine whether the gloves will be industrial- or medical-grade. The latter are subject to more rigorous testing.

The packaging phase
Once the gloves are done with production, workers package and pack them for shipping. The gloves travel from the manufacturing plants in Southeast Asia to the U.S. by ocean freight.

And there you have it, that is how latex gloves are made.  From something as simple as tree sap, you get durable barrier protection in latex gloves. Learn how you can add the durable protection of Latex Gloves to your product line today, by becoming an AMMEX Distributor.  More disposable glove distributors rely on AMMEX to supply their customers with superior barrier protection products.

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Valentine’s Day: For the Love of Food Safety


Did you know economists predict Americans will spend $1.7 billion on candy this Valentine’s Day? That finding comes from the National Retail Federation and indicates a large need for disposable gloves in the food industry as the holiday of love approaches.

In addition to buying their sweethearts stuffed animals and roses, many consumers will shell out for chocolates, candy hearts and other holiday-themed treats. Plus, restaurants across the nation will be packed with couples looking to express their love over a nice meal.

With food processing and food service workers kicking into high gear in the days before and on the holiday, they will need extra gloves for increased production. This can be especially true in restaurants, where many chefs will be finding creative ways to hide engagement rings in desserts.

Food service workers already go through at least 20 pairs of gloves on average for a normal business day, so imagine what they will use on Valentine’s Day. Whether its preparing an array of heart-shaped entrees or packing the billions of conversation hearts the National Confectioner’s Association says manufacturers produce each year, show consumers some love by stocking up on disposable gloves.

For more information, follow this link.

AMMEXValentine’s Day: For the Love of Food Safety
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The History of Disposable Gloves


Disposable gloves had bright beginnings and were developed to address a longstanding need for cleaner practices and barrier protection. By understanding this history, your sales teams will be able to more fully express how essential gloves are to many industries.

Here is an overview of how disposable gloves came to be a necessity for many businesses:

1889
In May 1889, Johns Hopkins Hospital first opened its doors. Dr. William Stewart Halstead, who had a number of medical and surgical achievements, was the first surgeon in chief and one of four founding physicians, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. These achievements included new operations for hernia repair and gallstone removal, among others. Also, Halstead was known for precision and cleanliness, which is why it is no surprise history credits him with developing the first surgical glove.

“The early history of disposable gloves stems from the medical industry.”

After his nurse, and later wife, Caroline Hampton said the chemicals she handled for surgery gave her a rash, Halstead reached out to the Goodyear Rubber Co. to create rubber gloves for her hands. Hampton loved the gloves, and more pairs arrived. Not long after, Halstead’s entire surgical staff wore them during operations. At the time, they assumed the primary benefit was increased dexterity and gave little thought to hygiene.

1894
Joseph Lister, the first surgeon to sterilize his surgical tools and dressings, was responsible for making surgical gloves sterile. In 1894, about 50 percent of all surgical patients died. Many of these fatalities were due to the fact that surgeons did not wash their hands between surgeries and examinations, thereby passing pathogens between patients.

Lister used carbolic acid to sterilize his instruments, according to BBC News. This action would be the founding of antiseptic surgery and the inspiration for the development of Listerine by Joseph Lawrence.

1965
The Ansell Rubber Co. Pty. Ltd. ramped up its funding for surgical glove research in 1941. In 1965, Ansell developed the first disposable medical gloves. The manufacturer sterilized the gloves using gamma irradiation.

1992
In March 1992, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA) published its Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Around this time, there was increased awareness regarding HIV, and OHSA implemented the rule to protect workers who would come in contact with bodily fluids. OSHA’s standard required employers to provide personal protective equipment, including disposable gloves, to these workers.

The administration still requires gloves be worn in many applications, such as phlebotomies.

“Nitrile gloves first arrived on the market in the mid-1990s.”

Mid-1990s
During this time, nitrile disposable gloves first appeared on the market. These gloves, which come from acrylonitrile and butadiene monomers, provide more chemical resistance than latex gloves. Additionally, the gloves were perfect for wearers who had latex allergies and in medical settings where patients could have allergies.

According to Health & Safety International magazine, many manufacturers began working with nitrile after it became clear the material was useful in medical applications. Despite the fact nitrile could be used more often than latex, the synthetic rubber did not serve as a replacement for its predecessor. Rather, it was a product aimed at another market need: chemical resistance.

Today
Disposable gloves were born in the medical industry, and much of the innovation resulted from needs in exam applications. However, in more recent years, attention has shifted to safety uses for disposable gloves, such as automotive, food service and processing, and janitorial-sanitation.

In fact, the industrial market is the fastest growth sector for disposable glove usage. For example, in 2012, this market had the same glove revenue as the medical industry, with most of that revenue coming from nitrile gloves.

Disposable gloves have a rich history and much further to go. If you want to be a part of defining that future, contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor.

 

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What Does Your Glove Vendor do for You?


When was the last time you stopped and evaluated your relationship with your disposable glove vendor? Sure, they sell you gloves, but what do they do to help you sell those gloves to your customers?

Not all vendors will provide you with what you need to become successful selling their products, and you don’t have to be content with that type of relationship. In fact, you should seek something more akin to a partnership that helps you grow and develop in your glove sales strategies. Batman did not hand Robin a bunch of gadgets and send his young ward off to fight crime alone, and you should not get that treatment from any vendor.

With AMMEX, you become part of a similar dynamic duo. We want to see you succeed and provide the tools, guidance and assistance so you will achieve your glove sales goals.

What do you get for your money?
When evaluating your vendor, you must look at a variety of factors to determine if that interaction is more relational or transactional. While the transaction is a part of any relationship with the vendor, it should not be the only part.  If your vendor’s sales representatives contact you only when it’s time to reorder, you may not be in a strong relationship.  AMMEX

Here are some questions to ask yourself to determine if your vendor is taking the extra step:

  • Does the vendor understand full scope of your business? According to ZDNet, this is one of the most important aspects of evaluating a vendor. If your glove supplier does not understand what you do or your market, how will it ensure you are getting the right types of gloves for your customers? For example, say you own a wholesale auto parts company, and your sales contact is pushing you to supply medical gloves. That vendor is not advising the best product for your market.
  • Does the vendor keep in touch? This means more than checking in when your supply is low. Is your supplier recommending new products, and are those products viable for your market? When new industry trends appear, does your vendor keep you posted and provide some strategies for how to leverage those trends for sales? You do not want a vendor that is on autopilot during the entire relationship.
  • Does the vendor give you strategies for success? If your supplier has not given you some best practices for how to sell disposable gloves, then you are working with the wrong vendor. While gloves are useful in a number of industries, emerging market opportunities where employees traditionally did not wear gloves still present some opposition. What, if anything, is your vendor doing to help your team overcome those challenges?

The AMMEX total package
When you are tired of not maximizing the opportunity, then it is time to succeed with the best. Let AMMEX supercharge your sales teams when it comes to glove sales. In addition to supply, we provide sales and marketing support.

AMMEX provides industry specific materials including marketing and samples tailored to your specific customer base. You will also receive custom flyers for your business. This allows you to get your customers up to date about all of AMMEX’s offerings while promoting your business as their one-stop shop for their barrier protection needs.

“Let AMMEX supercharge your sales teams.”

Do not think we are going to send you a bunch of marketing and sales supplies, and you are own your own. Before you get started, at AMMEX we not only get to know your business, but also provides insight to potential customers around your business. We evaluate your current customers and help you find new ways to generate sales. Additionally, we will keep you posted on any trends that could impact your sales and provide regular calls to ensure you are getting the most out of AMMEX’s products and support. We don’t want you to add a SKU if it is not the right thing for your business.

Like any vendor, we will let you know when we have new products. However, we will not inundate you with a ton of new gloves without telling your how they will work for your customers. Our Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile gloves, for example, provide a number of features, and if you have an industrial factory nearby, we are going to tell you the value proposition these gloves have for those customers.

What does your glove vendor do for you?  Any vendor can sell you gloves. AMMEX is here to help you sell more. Contact your dedicated AMMEX representative today or contact us to become a distributor today!  If you already partner with AMMEX but do not fully utilize the aforementioned sales and marketing tools, speak with your salesperson to take advantage of these services.

Be the disposable glove supplier your customers need with the AMMEX advantage.

AMMEXWhat Does Your Glove Vendor do for You?
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2014 Person of the Year: Barrier Protection Saves Lives


Equipped with barrier protection, the Ebola fighters quieted the epidemic, earning the title of Time Magazine’s 2014 Person of the Year.

This distinction did not go to an individual, but instead, recognized the many medical professionals who risked their personal safety to help combat the Ebola outbreak in West Africa that turned into an epidemic. Media outlets have likened these individuals to brave heroes facing deadly villain.

“Proper barrier protection helped Ebola fighters slow the virus’s spread and earn the title of Time Magazine’s 2014 Person of the Year. “

Their main defense included intense containment protocols and barrier protection in the form of disposable gloves, hoods and other items. With the epidemic waning, it is clear that these measures have been successful in quelling this international threat.

In addition to being recognized as Time Magazine’s 2014 Person of the Year, The White House congratulated these courageous men and women for their achievement. While the Ebola epidemic is an extreme case, it demonstrates the importance of having the right personal protective equipment.

Whether you are in the ranks of Ebola fighters, a dentist or even performing an oil change, make sure you have the right gloves for the job.

For more information, follow this link.

AMMEX2014 Person of the Year: Barrier Protection Saves Lives
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Get a Grip: A Glove Texture Introduction


While you may be aware of how various applications call for different disposable glove materials, how much do you know about glove textures?

How to describe glove textures
Glove texture comes from the formers during production. Currently, there is no standard for describing the extent to which gloves are textured. Some gloves are only textured on the fingertips while others are fully textured.

Imagine the surface of a textured glove as a mountain range. If the valleys are deeper, the texture is more prominent. This allows more liquid to pass through the channels and for the glove to make greater contact with the surface of an object.

“AMMEX Disposable gloves have various levels of texture.”

Here is an overview of texture types:

Smooth: These are gloves that do not have any texture, and most are vinyl. Smooth gloves are suitable for applications such as hair care, food preparation and food service.

Micro-roughened: This is the lightest form of texturing and is mostly for nitrile and latex gloves. In fact, 95 percent of nitrile gloves are microroughened. These gloves have a surface that appears to be lightly sanded and are great for medical applications because they provide additional grip for holding tools without disturbing patients or procedures. Additionally, they are more suitable for gripping small objects.

Aggressively textured: This category has the most intense level of texture. AMMEX Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves, for example, have a diamond raised texture, which is particularly useful for gripping fasteners, nuts and bolts when the glove is slippery. Manufacturers produce these gloves on textured formers, which require more material. This added thickness provides additional grip and protection.

The grip on latex gloves is not entirely from texture. Instead, manufacturers alter the finishing process by using less chlorine during chlorination to maintain surface tackiness.

Why use textured gloves
Wearers of gloves can’t always control the environment, so choosing the right glove for the application they are being used in is essential. Texture is a key consideration when selecting the right glove for the job.

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How Manufacturers Test Glove Quality


Given the many uses for disposable gloves, they must undergo rigorous inspection before they are ready for sale. In the automotive, janitorial-sanitation and agricultural industries, workers deal with a number of harsh chemicals, which means the gloves they wear must be proven to provide the right amount of protection. The same is true for medical applications, where employees need a safe barrier against pathogens.

As such, manufacturers use extensive testing to determine which applications a glove is appropriate for, with medical-grade gloves having higher standards. Here’s an overview of the process:

Standards for minimum quality
Glove inspection is based on acceptable quality limits (AQL). For this product, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration sets this standard, and the testing methods for AQL are from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), a firm that creates standards for various industries across the world.

AQL is a method that applies to batches of gloves and functions as a percentage. For example, in a batch of 100 gloves with an AQL of 3.0, only three gloves in the batch can fail the test. For medical-grade gloves, the AQL is 1.5 or lower. If more than three gloves fail, the entire batch does not meet the standard. In this case, manufacturers will review the manufacturing process to determine what requires adjustment.

Given the risks in the medical field, AQL is lower for medical-grade gloves.

“Medical-grade gloves have higher AQL standards.”

Testing methods for gloves
Glove quality testing involves various inspections. The pinhole leak test, which checks for barrier integrity, is one that determines whether gloves are suitable for medical applications. This is because even the smallest breach in the glove material permits wearers from exposure to pathogens. In this test, manufacturers fill the gloves with one liter of water, close the gloves at the cuff and hang the gloves upside down. Gloves that do not have leaks during the testing period are acceptable for medical applications.

One interesting fact about disposable glove testing and AQL is manufacturers typically produce medical-grade and industrial-grade gloves on the same line. Although industrial-grade gloves also pass all standard quality testing by the manufacturer, they are not required to undergo testing for medical purposes. This is not to say industrial-grade gloves are not of safe quality, but it is simply a cost-efficient way for manufacturers to produce both types of gloves while providing the appropriate level of quality.

AMMEXHow Manufacturers Test Glove Quality
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Stock up for Super Bowl XLIX


Super Bowl XLIX is approaching, and while the Seattle Seahawks and New England Patriots will provide the spectacle on the field, what about the one in the stands at University of Phoenix Stadium? How about the scenes in bars, restaurants and other venues across the country?

While players will be showing off on the field, hundreds of millions of people will be watching the game with a hot dog, nachos or other food item in their hands, which means members of the food service industry must stand ready to handle the high demand. This means having enough pairs of disposable gloves handy to feed all those hungry football fans.

Chicken wings, for example, are a staple of sports game cuisine. In fact, the National Chicken Council predicted in 2014 that Americans would eat 1.25 billion wings during that year’s championship game. With popular restaurants providing numerous orders of wings of all flavors, how can these and other food venues not afford to stock up on gloves before the big game – especially considering this industry goes through 20 pairs a day during normal periods?

Whether it’s the concession vendors at the big game or a local pizza joint pushing out pies to viewers at home, now is the time to get the right barrier protection.

AMMEXStock up for Super Bowl XLIX
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Start to Finish: The Disposable Glove Supply Chain


Where do disposable gloves come from? While you may not hear that question as often as “Where do babies come from,” this makes the process no less interesting. In fact, the supply chain is an international network that includes manufacturers, distributors and shippers.

Here is an overview:

Raw material production
A few countries are known for producing various materials used for disposable gloves. All of these nations are in Southeast Asia.

Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia are the top producers of natural latex rubber. Many Vietnamese farmers, for example, heavily rely on the demand for latex. Most export their latex across the border into China, according to Toui Tre News.

Speaking of China, the country is the biggest producer of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or vinyl. A report from China Market Research Reports showed the country is the top location in the world for PVC production potential, output and consumption for all PVC products. Additionally, the researchers forecast China’s PVC demand will continue to rise through 2017.

Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia have the largest market share for nitrile butadiene rubber. In fact, multiple sources report Malaysia glove production skyrocketed in response to the recent Ebola outbreak. Reuters said the country shipped 20 million medical gloves to Africa to help control the outbreak.

“Manufacturing centers in Southeast Asia produce the gloves AMMEX sells.”

The manufacturing phase
In the aforementioned countries, manufacturers compound the raw materials and begin producing and dipping disposable gloves. AMMEX’s production centers are in all of the aforementioned countries, where the sourcing and procurement phases occur.

In these factories, the manufacturers produce and test the gloves. The production process uses hand-shaped formers, which the manufacturers dip in the glove materials. After the gloves dry, the workers rinse them and apply food-grade cornstarch powder if necessary. Nitrile gloves undergo the chlorination process, as they do not utilize powder for easier donning.

The production cycle is where they ensure competitive pricing, and quality controls enter the process here, as they want to make certain the gloves are exceptional before they pack them. The testing process is based on AMMEX’s unique standards to ensure consistent, high-quality supply. Manufacturers package and pack gloves that meet our standards and prepare them for shipping by loading them in containers. All of this occurs within a 60- to 120-day lead time.

Shipping to the US and distribution
Once the gloves are ready, the manufacturers ship them to the U.S. via ocean freight. After AMMEX gloves arrive in the states, they then move to one of our three North American distributions centers: Atlanta, Toronto or Seattle.

The journey does not end here. The gloves then go to distributors, who in turn ship them to waiting customers. Also, AMMEX ships the day after the orders post so customers can get their gloves right away.

While detailing this process is not as uncomfortable as parents explaining the birds and the bees to their children, it can provide customers with the peace of mind knowing AMMEX is about the highest quality from start to finish.

AMMEXStart to Finish: The Disposable Glove Supply Chain
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