The Right Glove for the Job


Disposable gloves are used for a multitude of purposes, from food preparation to medical to automotive. However, it’s important to know which type of gloves are best suited for your intended purpose. Here’s a look at the main types of gloves and their uses:

Latex
Latex gloves offer the best fit and dexterity, which is why  these gloves are more comfortable for longer wear. Outside of the medical and dental fields, latex gloves are commonly used for janitorial work, beauty services, child care, safe chemical handling, plumbing and painting.

Nitrile
Currently, 80 percent of the disposable gloves in the automotive field are nitrile because they offer superior puncture resistance and barrier protection against a variety of harsh chemicals. Nitrile gloves are also becoming more popular in the medical and dental fields because of the growing prevalence of latex sensitivities. Nitrile gloves conform to the hands during wear for comfortable fit, and they are highly resistant to a variety of chemicals. Industrial and medical grade nitrile gloves come in a range of different colors, which may be functional as well as eye-catching. For example, orange industrial-grade nitrile gloves help workers be more aware of their hands when working in dark environments.

Vinyl
As more food service and processing workers use gloves during preparation, vinyl glove usage is taking off. Vinyl gloves contain no latex, have a smooth surface and have a looser fit than nitrile or latex gloves although they still conform to the hands. These gloves are also used in other industries, including medical and janitorial-sanitation.

Poly
Poly gloves are perfect for food preparation and handling because of their loose fit, which makes it easier for employees to remove the gloves for more frequent glove changes. Stretch poly gloves have a more enhanced grip and are easier to don.

 

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Not without Gloves: Specialty Chemicals


Specialty chemicals are produced to serve a specific function and may be composed of a single chemical or a blend. Specialty chemicals often have an influence on the end product in the manufacturing process and are commonly used in the oil industry, agriculture, electronics, construction and consumer goods, such as detergents, perfumes and paper items, according to Value Line. Because these blends vary depending on the application, specialty chemicals should always be handled with care, which means utilizing gloves and other personal protective equipment (PPE).

Compared to other chemicals, specialty chemicals are typically manufactured in a batch process rather than continuous, which results in a pure product, according to the Society of Chemical Manufacturers and Affiliates. Each compound may have only one or two uses, which means companies need to understand the specific chemical compounds used in their processes to select the right gloves for the job. Here are some components of specialty chemicals and the appropriate gloves for handling them:

Iodine
Although iodine is elemental, compounds of this chemical often appear in specialty chemicals. Commonly used in medicines and animal feed supplements, iodine compounds may be considered specialty chemicals. Iodine is an essential nutrient, but too much exposure – 400 micrograms per day or more – has been linked to thyroid complications, according to Fox News. This condition may cause fatigue, depression and dry skin. Vinyl, nitrile and latex gloves all provide sufficient barrier protection when handling iodine.

Printing ink
Many printing inks contain carbon black, which is classified as a carcinogen. Ink is used for a variety of purposes, and overexposure may be risky. Latex and nitrile gloves protect the hands from printing ink.

Lubricants
Often found in the oil industry and automotive applications, lubricants contain mineral oils and may be carcinogenic. Nitrile gloves offer protection from this specialty chemical and are well suited for automotive applications because this glove material is highly puncture resistant and offers protection from many common engine chemicals. Latex gloves may not be suitable for automotive work because they are not resistant to petroleum-based chemicals.

Plastics
Petroleum and a variety of specialty chemicals are used to manufacture different types of plastics. Nitrile gloves are also recommended for handling petroleum of up to 100 percent.

This has been AMMEX’s “Not without gloves” series, where we have discussed hazardous chemicals and effective PPE for each. For more about chemical resistance and barrier protection, contact AMMEX today.

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Get Dad Gloves for Father’s Day


It often feels challenging to find the perfect Father’s Day gift, especially when it seems like you father already has everything. If you are tired of buying your dad a new tie every year, consider a gift that supports his hobbies. What does Dad need to pursue his favorite activities?

Automotive
If your father loves tinkering around under the hood of a classic car, high-quality disposable nitrile gloves make a perfect gift for Dad’s favorite hobby. AMMEX’s Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves are a perfect addition for Dad’s garage because they are well-suited to automotive applications. Not only are nitrile gloves resistant to a variety of common engine chemicals, such as hydraulic fluids and antifreeze, but they are also highly resistant to punctures. Nitrile gloves provide protection from gasoline as well.In particular, orange nitrile gloves are ideal for automotive work because the bright color helps people be more aware of where their hands are in dark spaces. If you are getting Dad other automotive equipment, disposable nitrile gloves make a perfect complement.

Gardening
Does Dad have a green thumb? High-quality leather work gloves are great for spending time in the garden. AMMEX’s split cowhide gloves with a starched cuff will protect Dad’s hands from thorns and blistering, allowing him to spend quality time in the garden without scuffs and scrapes.

Building and woodworking
If your dad enjoys working with his hands in his workshop, split cowhide gloves with a rubberized cuff are a great gift. These gloves may be better suited for heavy-duty applications because the rubberized cuff helps the gloves adhere to the wrists, and they have a fleece-lined palm to keep the hands warm while working outside.

Depending on your dad’s favorite hobbies, the right work gloves make an excellent Father’s Day present. Contact AMMEX to learn more.

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Not without Gloves: Wood stains


Wood stains come in a variety of compositions and consistencies. Some are semi-transparent, and others are intended to create a thick coating over the wood. Because of the variety of products on the market, specific stains may have multiple hazardous chemicals in them. Here are some chemicals commonly found in wood stains and effective disposable gloves for each:

Ethylene glycol
Although many wood stains are water-based, they still contain a small percentage of a solvent, such as ethylene glycol. This chemical is poorly absorbed through the skin, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control still recommends chemical-resistant gloves for handling ethylene glycol. For ethylene glycol in its liquid form, vinyl, nitrile and latex gloves all provide protection. In the solvent’s ether form, latex and nitrile gloves may be used for a limited time. On-site testing should always be conducted to determine the safe handling time for a particular solution.

Sodium hydroxide
Sodium hydroxide is a corrosive with the potential to cause burns on any tissue it comes into contact with. Chemical burns may even lead to deep tissue damage, so this chemical should always be handled with care. Solutions of sodium hydroxide with up to a 50 percent concentration may be safely handled with latex, nitrile or vinyl gloves.

Mineral spirits are hydrocarbons commonly found in wood stains, paints and paint thinners. Direct contact with mineral spirits causes skin burns, irritation and even necrosis. Nitrile gloves offer protection for safe handling of mineral spirit concentrations of up to 100 percent.

Ethyl alcohol
Ethyl alcohol is most commonly found in alcoholic beverages, and it is also used as a solvent and to manufacture other chemicals. Ethyl alcohol is flammable, and high concentrations may irritate the skin or cause redness or dryness. For wood stains containing ethyl alcohol, latex and nitrile gloves are well suited for application. Vinyl gloves may be used for a limited time.

Latex
Some film finishes are latex-based for a more solid finish and better color retention than other stains but adds risks for people with latex sensitivities. Nitrile gloves are suitable for people with latex sensitivities or allergies, and these gloves provide superior chemical resistance for many different compounds.

1,4-Dioxane
1,4-dioxane is a chemical found in wood stains and a suspected carcinogen that may also cause skin irritation. Latex and vinyl gloves may be used for a limited time for protection from 1,4-dioxane.

 

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Emphasize Safety with PPE


Ensuring workplace safety is no easy task, especially in industrial environments with the potential for many hazards. Depending on the industry, workplaces have risks of slips, falls, dangerous equipment and machinery or toxic chemicals. Even though establishing a safe workplace is a complicated undertaking, providing the right safety equipment is less expensive than coping with injuries in the long run.

The costs of an unsafe workplace
Providing personal protective equipment may be costly, especially for organizations that have large staffs. The U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) has strict standards for workplace safety, and violations quickly add up. These are the different types of OSHA violations and the costs for each:

  • Serious: OSHA issues serious violations when an employee suffers a severe injury or dies on the job. Typically, these violations occur when the employer reasonably could have known about the risk. OSHA may issue mandatory penalties of up to $7,000 for each serious violation.
  • Other than serious: This type of violation stems from hazards that have a direct relationship to workplace safety and health but probably do not have the ability to cause a serious injury or death. Other-than-serious violations come with a $7,000 discretionary fine.
  • Willful: Willful violations are when employers know they are in violation of OSHA’s standards. Companies know there are hazards but do nothing to fix the situation. Fines range from $5,000 to $70,000 for each violation. In addition, if a willful violation caused a death, employers may be subject to court-imposed fines or even imprisonment. Criminal convictions may result in a $250,000 fine for an individual or a $500,000 penalty for an organization.
  • Repeat: After OSHA cites companies for any of the above violations, failure to fix the issue may result in a repeat violation. In addition, employers may be cited for similar hazards, not just the same problem. These violations cost up to $70,000 per citation.

“Rather than pay for violations, employers should take the steps to enable a safer workplace, including providing PPE.”

Clearly, the costs for noncompliance are steep. The costs of criminal convictions for willful violations have the potential to put companies out of business. Rather than pay for violations, employers should take the steps to enable a safer workplace, including providing PPE.

PPE guards against chemical burns, which carry hefty fines from OSHA. Safety News Alert reported on two companies that received OSHA fines for chemical hazards, totaling $40,500 and $50,785 respectively. The company with the larger fine failed to utilize the appropriate PPE. Chemical burns cause serious injuries that may also require workers compensation. Providing aprons, sleeves, bouffant caps and other PPE reduces the risk of these workplace hazards and other threats.

Selecting PPE to reduce exposure to workplace hazards
PPE minimizes exposure to chemicals, radiation, electricity, machinery and other workplace hazards. PPE includes gloves, safety glasses, face masks, coveralls, hair nets, bouffant covers, shoe covers and sleeves. All PPE should fit well and be comfortable to wear for work, which will encourage its use. Poorly fitted PPE may lead to workplace injuries or illnesses because an employee could be exposed to dangerous conditions.

If PPE is being used, employers need to establish a program to ensure compliance. Simply providing the equipment will not necessarily guarantee employees will use it on their own. A strong PPE program addresses the existing workplace hazards and trains employees on when PPE is necessary, what types they need to use, how to properly don and doff it and the lifespan of each piece of equipment. It is also important to discuss the limitations of PPE so employees are more aware in the workplace.

June is OSHA and the National Safety Council’s (NSC) National Safety Month. The NSC provides free resources on improving workplace safety and enhancing emergency preparedness to help employers build and improve their PPE programs. Safety is a a paramount concern for all employers, especially with the high financial risks of noncompliance. June is a great time to evaluate safety equipment and increase training for employees to create a culture of workplace safety.

It is easy to add PPE to your product line up. Contact us or contact your AMMEX representative to get started today.

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Choose Quality Work Gloves

Depending on the situations workers regularly encounter, they may need work gloves that are suitable for repeat use. Rather than wearing disposable gloves, dipped, dishwashing or leather gloves for home and industrial applications may be best for messy or tough situations. Some jobs need more strength and protection than disposal gloves offer, which is why AMMEX has a full line of heavy duty work gloves to meet your needs. You may need a stronger grip, warmth or better puncture protection. Here is the complete list of work gloves and their uses:

Latex dipped work gloves
Latex dipped work gloves have a string polyester cotton interior and are partially dipped in texturized latex for better grip. These gloves are used for industrial and home situations when a strong grip is necessary. However, these gloves may not be suitable for people with latex sensitivities.

Nitrile dipped work gloves
These gloves are stretch nylon and partially dipped in nitrile on the outside. These may be a better choice for people who should not come into contact with latex. Nitrile dipped gloves are seamless and have a texture that makes gripping easier.

Dishwashing gloves
Beyond what their name implies, dishwashing gloves are well suited for a variety of uses in the home, industrial facilities and commercial kitchens. They also may be used for cleaning purposes because of the longer 12 inch cuff. They are 17 millimeters thick to protect the wearer’s hands and are flock lined for comfort and textured across the palms.

Knit work gloves
Brown or white jersey knit gloves are a cotton and polyester blend and come in two sizes. It is important to keep your hands warm when working outside during the winter, and these gloves are fleece-lined, making them suitable for working in cold temperatures. The brown color may be better for working in dirty environments.

Leather work gloves
AMMEX offers multiple types of leather gloves for a variety of uses. Unlined leather driver gloves are cooler for longer wear. They are made out of grain leather and have a winged thumb. Unlined leather driving gloves are a great choice for machine operators to keep their hands comfortable while using equipment. Split cowhide gloves with a rubberized cuff are heavy duty for protection, and fleece lined in the palm to keep the hands warm. The rubberized gauntlet cuff helps the glove stay on the hand. These gloves are great for garden work, especially when handling tools or thorny plants. Alternatively, AMMEX offers split cowhide gloves with a starched cuff that may be more suitable for people with latex sensitivities.

String knit work gloves
These gloves are made from cotton and polyester well-suited for gardening and other yard work applications. They also come in a variety with double PVC dots for better grip.

Work glove liners
Sold in both cotton and nylon varieties, workers are able to use these glove liners inside other gloves or on their own. Nylon glove liners are lint free, making them well-suited for inspecting products on the line. Cotton glove liners make heavy duty work gloves more comfortable for longer wear.

Contact AMMEX to learn more about work gloves.

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Top 9 Safety Tips


Many workplaces have hazards that endanger workers, but many of these issues are avoidable with the proper training, safety gear and protocols. Here are the top workplace risks and what may be done to avoid them:

1. Keep areas free of clutter to prevent falls

Falls are one of the most common workplace injuries and resulted in 699 fatal injuries in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Of injuries where the height of the fall was reported, one in four workers fell from a height of 10 feet or less, calling attention to the risks of falls from a short height. Even in cases with no fatalities, falling to a lower level may cause serious injuries.

Falls often occur in the workplace because of cluttered areas, slippery or uneven floor surfaces, floor holes, wall openings, unprotected edges and improperly positioned ladders. Although the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Association has regulations requiring specific fall protection measures for different industries, falls may still be common due to a lack of safety culture in an organization. To avoid falls, companies should ensure all working areas are free from clutter. In addition, shoe covers with rubberized grips give workers better traction.

2. Implement a culture of safety

Understanding the unique risks at your company or in your industry helps managers create effective training. Emphasize the importance of safety so employees take it to heart. Workplace safety should be an early area of focus when new workers start at the company. Conduct regular inspections to identify anything that could become a hazard.

3. Keep emergency exits and equipment shutoffs accessible

Reducing clutter has multiple safety benefits. Not only will it reduce falls, but it also makes emergency exits more accessible. Maintaining clear access to emergency equipment shutoffs allows machinery to be turned off quickly.

4. Reduce workplace stress

Stressed out employees are more likely to be injured on the job. Long hours tire workers, making them less aware of their surroundings. Encourage workers to talk to their supervisors if they feel high levels of stress. Allow time for regular breaks so employees have a chance to recharge.

5. Lift correctly

Picking up heavy items improperly causes back injuries and chronic pain. Workers who need to lift heavy items should use proper form to avoid injury. Lift slowly and smoothly from the thighs, not the back. After picking up a heavy item, hold it close to the body. Use mechanical aids whenever possible to reduce the likelihood of back injuries.

6. Train workers on all tools and equipment

Heavy machinery introduces risks into the workplace when employees do not use equipment properly. Anyone who works with specific machinery should receive training. In addition, equipment should be regularly checked to ensure it stays in working order.

7. Report all hazards immediately

Safety is everyone’s responsibility. Encourage workers to report any unsafe conditions they notice in the facility to prevent injuries. Emphasizing the culture of safety increases reporting.

8. Understand chemical hazards

Workers in many industries encounter dozens of chemicals every day. Companies need to maintain a knowledge of all the chemicals they use and understand the health effects. OSHA recommends transitioning to safer chemicals. Some compounds have alternatives that present fewer health risks to employees. Only a small number of chemicals are regulated in the workplace, and 190,000 illnesses and 50,000 deaths are the result of chemical exposure every year, according to OSHA. Janitorial, automotive, pathology labs and other industries may be able to switch to chemicals that are less hazardous to workers and the environment.

9. Use the right personal protective equipment for the job

With risks in nearly every industry, some sectors must provide personal protective equipment for employees. All employees need to be educated on how to use PPE, and all gear should fit well and be comfortable, which encourages employees to make use of it. When it comes to disposable gloves for barrier protection, employers need to be mindful of chemical and puncture resistance, fit and latex sensitivities. All PPE should be tested before implemented across an organization. In addition to gloves, companies may need face masks, sleeves and other protective coverings.

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Not Without Gloves: Pesticides


Pesticides should always be handled with the proper barrier protection. Different formulations target various organisms, such as insects, rodents, algae, weeds and fungi. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates the use of all pesticides and requires chemicals that have been registered for many years to be reassessed to ensure they meet current standards.

Pesticides typically come in organic or inorganic solutions with an active ingredient. Although some pesticide formulas are less toxic than others, they are still hazardous to human health in high levels, and anyone handling these products must protect themselves. Here are some of the hazardous chemicals commonly found in pesticides and effective gloves for handling each:

Naphthalene
Naphthalene is made from crude oil, coal tar or created when other chemicals burn. It was the first registered pesticide in the U.S. in 1948. Because this chemical is found in mothballs, it has been shown to cause anemia in infants when the clothing was not washed prior to wear, according to the National Pesticide Information Center at Oregon State University. It has been linked to anemia in adults as well. Although naphthalene breaks down in the environment over time, workers should wear gloves when handling pesticides that contain this chemical.

Latex, nitrile and vinyl gloves are all resistant to naphthalene. Because these types of gloves all provide protection from this chemical, it is easier for companies to accommodate people with latex sensitivities.

Paradichlorobenzene
Another common insecticide, paradichlorobenzene causes a burning sensation on the skin after prolonged contact. Nitrile gloves are recommended protection from skin exposure to this toxin.

Capsaicin
Even naturally occurring chemicals can cause harm. Capsaicin, for example, is a naturally occurring chemical that gives chili peppers their heat. It is used to deter mites, insects and animals. While it is safe for humans to eat, it may irritate the skin or eyes upon contact, especially when highly concentrated. The effects are temporary and it is considered a safer pesticide because it is a naturally occurring substance, but skin contact may cause pain. High concentrations of capsaicin may burn through latex gloves in a short time. Nitrile gloves provide greater protection from this harsh substance.

For any pesticide, it is important to know the solution’s chemical composition and then test disposal work gloves for resistance to identify safe exposure levels. Contact your AMMEX representative or contact us on our website to learn more about the right barrier protection and add gloves to your line up.

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Baby Care Products for the Growing Market


Child care is a growing industry, and day care facilities need to have the right supplies on hand. With the high number of children in care arrangements, child care providers go through a substantial amount of disposable gloves, changing table paper, baby wipes, bibs and diaper disposal bags.

In 2014, 11 million children under five years old in the U.S. attended day care each week, according to research from Child​ CareAware of America. These children spend an average of 36 hours per week in day care. With the amount of time the average child spends in daycare before entering preschool, it is no surprise how many supplies these facilities go through.

This is particularly evident with diaper disposal bags, for example. Babies one to five months old go through eight to 10 diapers per day, totaling 870 diapers per month, according to New Kids Center. Although the number of diapers per day may slow after a child’s first year, the total is still significant. The average American baby will go through 6,500 to 10,000 diapers before reaching 30 months old. The significant diaper usage from small children supports the necessity for products that help day care workers handle diapers.

“Day care facilities need bibs, wipes and diaper disposable bags to provide a superior level of care.”

Having the right supplies on hand
Rolls of sanitary changing table paper help employees maintain a sanitary environment. Along with diapers, childcare facilities should be well-stocked with baby wipes. AMMEX’s baby wipes are alcohol free and contain Vitamin E and aloe, making them safer for use on sensitive skin . Because of the hours children spend in day care, facilities stock poly bibs on hand for meal times, which feature a crumb pocket to limit the mess.Disposable bibs are beneficial for facilities that care for a large number of children, as they reduce the amount of laundry loads per day.

Child care facilities represent a significant opportunity for distributors because they use these supplies every day and go through them quickly.

Disposable gloves for child care
One overlooked supply for child care facilities is vinyl gloves. Gloves are needed for a variety of applications, including changing diapers, food preparation and general cleaning. For diaper changing, AMMEX Stretch Synthetic Vinyl Exam Gloves are an excellent fit because they are medical grade, making them more effective barrier protection. AMMEX GlovePlus Vinyl Gloves are well-suited for food preparation and cleaning the facility. Vinyl gloves are looser fitting than nitrile or latex, which makes them easier to don and doff. These gloves are less expensive than other materials, which helps day care facilities save money on something they use multiple times per day.

As the demand for child care services increases, day care providers need to consider their supplies. These facilities need to have the right changing table paper, baby wipes, diaper disposal bags and gloves on hand to offer a high quality of care. Distributors should make the most of this growing market for disposables.

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What Your Shelves Say about Your Disposable Gloves


Did you know salespeople are not the only ones who talk to consumers about the benefits of buying disposable gloves? If not, you forget important product advocates: your displays.

Gloves will not sell themselves. Strategic displays allow you to uncover the hidden potential of the glove line to sell more products and increase your sales. The good news is AMMEX Corporation’s products and Sales Acceleration Solution® (SAS) give you the tools you need to make your shelves talk the disposable gloves talk and entice consumers to buy your products.

What you get with AMMEX products
AMMEX packaging starts a visual conversation with consumers. Not only do the glove images speak in a language every customer understands, but they also present three views:

AMMEX-What-does-your-shelves-say

  • Option A is to show the front face of the packaging to customers, which provides the largest surface area for viewing.
  • Option B is to stack the boxes with the side face pointing at the aisle, creating a display with a medium length and a short height.
  • The final view, option C, is to position the gloves with the more vertical face directed at customers, providing a shorter length but more height.

“Strategic displays allow you to increase your sales.”

How to display your glove inventory
The aforementioned configurations for displaying your gloves rely on your goals for the products and the shelf dimensions.

Here are some tips for arranging your gloves on shelving units:

  • To maximize space, use option B, as indicated on the right in the image below. Within a standard 12-foot shelving unit, this strategy allows for gloves to occupy four rows. As a result, you display more sizes across the space. However, this option provides only one view of the product. Another drawback of option B is this route presents challenges for placing barcode index numbers (BINs) on the sides of the shelves to indicate the products present. For instance, if you place four glove sizes on one shelf because you have the space, you must fit those four BINs in the same space.
  • To display both the front and one side panel of the packaging, use a combination of options A and C, as shown on the left side of the image. The trade-off here is space is sacrificed for greater visibility, but managing the BIN channel will be easier.
  • Keep in mind products at eye level attract the most customers. Consequently, it is best to place your most profitable glove products in this position. Also, consider the sizes that are more likely to sell to your customers. It is best practice to always display large and extra large gloves, and judge how many small and medium products to display based on demand.

AMMEX-Showcase-the-product

These are various options for displaying AMMEX products on your shelves.

Keeping the conversation going with shelf talkers
Now that customers have seen the product, how do you close the sale – especially when a salesperson cannot always be present? This is where your shelf talkers become integral.

Shelf talkers are materials that you display with the products to educate customers about their purchasing decision. These include the laminated chemical resistance and glove sizing chart that comes with your SAS kit. Because these items provide information on topics such as the difference between poly and vinyl gloves, you supply the details necessary to successfully convert a sale without having a glove expert in the area at all times.

Also, consider zip tying glove samples from your SAS kit to the shelf or leaving a master bag near the products. This gives customers an interactive shopping experience where they truly feel the difference between the many glove types. Plus, this tactic helps reduce shrinkage by eliminating the need for customers to open boxes to feel the glove materials.

Maximizing your sales
None of the aforementioned tips work if you do not use them effectively. When choosing between options A, B and C, the key to boosting sales is to select a glove assortment and product layout that caters to your customers. For instance, if your shelf space accommodates only a 1-foot configuration (the top row in the image), do not overload that space with small latex gloves if your business mostly services auto technicians who need the chemical protection of nitrile gloves and have larger hands.

Another consideration is where you put the gloves display in the store. To keep customers from having an ah-ha moment at home about a product they should have purchased at your store, put different glove types next to accompanying items in your store. In hardware and paint stores, for example, 90 percent of the products pair well with nitrile gloves. By placing these gloves with related products, you ensure customers get everything they need in one trip. Clip strips and glove project packs (pictured on the left in the above image) are perfect for this task.

Any vendor can sell you gloves. AMMEX is here to help you sell more. Contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor.

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