Baby Care Products for the Growing Market


Child care is a growing industry, and day care facilities need to have the right supplies on hand. With the high number of children in care arrangements, child care providers go through a substantial amount of disposable gloves, changing table paper, baby wipes, bibs and diaper disposal bags.

In 2014, 11 million children under five years old in the U.S. attended day care each week, according to research from Child​ CareAware of America. These children spend an average of 36 hours per week in day care. With the amount of time the average child spends in daycare before entering preschool, it is no surprise how many supplies these facilities go through.

This is particularly evident with diaper disposal bags, for example. Babies one to five months old go through eight to 10 diapers per day, totaling 870 diapers per month, according to New Kids Center. Although the number of diapers per day may slow after a child’s first year, the total is still significant. The average American baby will go through 6,500 to 10,000 diapers before reaching 30 months old. The significant diaper usage from small children supports the necessity for products that help day care workers handle diapers.

“Day care facilities need bibs, wipes and diaper disposable bags to provide a superior level of care.”

Having the right supplies on hand
Rolls of sanitary changing table paper help employees maintain a sanitary environment. Along with diapers, childcare facilities should be well-stocked with baby wipes. AMMEX’s baby wipes are alcohol free and contain Vitamin E and aloe, making them safer for use on sensitive skin . Because of the hours children spend in day care, facilities stock poly bibs on hand for meal times, which feature a crumb pocket to limit the mess.Disposable bibs are beneficial for facilities that care for a large number of children, as they reduce the amount of laundry loads per day.

Child care facilities represent a significant opportunity for distributors because they use these supplies every day and go through them quickly.

Disposable gloves for child care
One overlooked supply for child care facilities is vinyl gloves. Gloves are needed for a variety of applications, including changing diapers, food preparation and general cleaning. For diaper changing, AMMEX Stretch Synthetic Vinyl Exam Gloves are an excellent fit because they are medical grade, making them more effective barrier protection. AMMEX GlovePlus Vinyl Gloves are well-suited for food preparation and cleaning the facility. Vinyl gloves are looser fitting than nitrile or latex, which makes them easier to don and doff. These gloves are less expensive than other materials, which helps day care facilities save money on something they use multiple times per day.

As the demand for child care services increases, day care providers need to consider their supplies. These facilities need to have the right changing table paper, baby wipes, diaper disposal bags and gloves on hand to offer a high quality of care. Distributors should make the most of this growing market for disposables.

AMMEXBaby Care Products for the Growing Market
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Not without Gloves: Salon Chemicals

Helping clients look their best may come at a price for salon workers because they are often exposed to hazardous chemicals. Hair and nail salon workers handle potentially toxic chemicals on a daily basis, and they need to know how to protect themselves. Employees must be aware of the risks and don the right personal protective equipment based on the chemicals they handle. Here are some common salon chemicals and barrier protection for each:

Acetone
A common ingredient in both nail polish remover and hairspray, acetone may cause skin irritation. In some cases, there may not be sufficient alternatives to allow salon workers to completely avoid exposure to this chemical. However, latex gloves offer superior barrier protection so employees minimize skin exposure. Vinyl is not resistant to acetone, so latex is the best choice for handling acetone. However, depending on the length of exposure to chemicals, nitrile may be a better choice to avoid exposure to latex.

Formaldehyde
Formaldehyde, which is often found in nail polish and nail hardeners, is one of the riskiest chemicals for salon workers to handle because it may cause cancer after long-term exposure. From short-term exposure, formaldehyde causes skin irritation and dermatitis. Even low concentrations of formaldehyde may lead to negative side effects. The U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) recommended respirators for handling formaldehyde. Many salons are well-ventilated, but N95-rated masks filter out dust and germs. Gloves should also be used to protect the skin. Latex, vinyl and nitrile gloves offer protection from this chemical for concentrations up to 99 percent.

Trichloroethylene
Often used in hair extension glue and lace wig glue, trichloroethylene may cause eye and skin irritation, as well as nausea and disorientation. Long-term exposure may lead to dermatitis and liver and kidney damage. Nitrile gloves provide protection against this chemical. In addition, vinyl gloves may be used for a limited time to guard against trichloroethylene exposure.

Dibutyl phthalate
Dibutyl phthalate is found in nail polish and may cause skin irritation. Within the selection of glove materials, nitrile gloves protect workers from dibutyl phthalate whereas latex gloves may be used for a limited time to protect from this chemical.

Toulene
Used in many different industries and common in a number of beauty products, including nail polish, nail glue, hair dye and hairpiece bonding, toulene is one of the most toxic chemicals in salons. It has been linked to skin rashes, nausea, eye irritation and headaches. If workers are exposed to this chemical for an extended length of time, it may lead to birth defects or the loss of a pregnancy. Because this chemical is so toxic, vinyl gloves may be used, but for only a limited time.

Because concentrations may vary, it is important to check the safety data sheet issued by the manufacturer and conduct in-house testing to determine the safe exposure time. Gloves should always be replaced if they are torn or compromised in any way. Although nitrile gloves offer barrier protection against many common salon chemicals, it is crucial to understand the recommendations for each solution. Concentrations may vary by manufacturer, and salons need to ensure they select the right gloves for the application. In addition to chemicals, salon workers need gloves to protect them from customers’ nails, blood or skin.

To learn more about what glove is best for the chemicals you may be using contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor. If you are already a distributor, speak with your salesperson to discover more about what AMMEX can offer for you.

AMMEXNot without Gloves: Salon Chemicals
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What Your Shelves Say about Your Disposable Gloves


Did you know salespeople are not the only ones who talk to consumers about the benefits of buying disposable gloves? If not, you forget important product advocates: your displays.

Gloves will not sell themselves. Strategic displays allow you to uncover the hidden potential of the glove line to sell more products and increase your sales. The good news is AMMEX Corporation’s products and Sales Acceleration Solution® (SAS) give you the tools you need to make your shelves talk the disposable gloves talk and entice consumers to buy your products.

What you get with AMMEX products
AMMEX packaging starts a visual conversation with consumers. Not only do the glove images speak in a language every customer understands, but they also present three views:

AMMEX-What-does-your-shelves-say

  • Option A is to show the front face of the packaging to customers, which provides the largest surface area for viewing.
  • Option B is to stack the boxes with the side face pointing at the aisle, creating a display with a medium length and a short height.
  • The final view, option C, is to position the gloves with the more vertical face directed at customers, providing a shorter length but more height.

“Strategic displays allow you to increase your sales.”

How to display your glove inventory
The aforementioned configurations for displaying your gloves rely on your goals for the products and the shelf dimensions.

Here are some tips for arranging your gloves on shelving units:

  • To maximize space, use option B, as indicated on the right in the image below. Within a standard 12-foot shelving unit, this strategy allows for gloves to occupy four rows. As a result, you display more sizes across the space. However, this option provides only one view of the product. Another drawback of option B is this route presents challenges for placing barcode index numbers (BINs) on the sides of the shelves to indicate the products present. For instance, if you place four glove sizes on one shelf because you have the space, you must fit those four BINs in the same space.
  • To display both the front and one side panel of the packaging, use a combination of options A and C, as shown on the left side of the image. The trade-off here is space is sacrificed for greater visibility, but managing the BIN channel will be easier.
  • Keep in mind products at eye level attract the most customers. Consequently, it is best to place your most profitable glove products in this position. Also, consider the sizes that are more likely to sell to your customers. It is best practice to always display large and extra large gloves, and judge how many small and medium products to display based on demand.

AMMEX-Showcase-the-product

These are various options for displaying AMMEX products on your shelves.

Keeping the conversation going with shelf talkers
Now that customers have seen the product, how do you close the sale – especially when a salesperson cannot always be present? This is where your shelf talkers become integral.

Shelf talkers are materials that you display with the products to educate customers about their purchasing decision. These include the laminated chemical resistance and glove sizing chart that comes with your SAS kit. Because these items provide information on topics such as the difference between poly and vinyl gloves, you supply the details necessary to successfully convert a sale without having a glove expert in the area at all times.

Also, consider zip tying glove samples from your SAS kit to the shelf or leaving a master bag near the products. This gives customers an interactive shopping experience where they truly feel the difference between the many glove types. Plus, this tactic helps reduce shrinkage by eliminating the need for customers to open boxes to feel the glove materials.

Maximizing your sales
None of the aforementioned tips work if you do not use them effectively. When choosing between options A, B and C, the key to boosting sales is to select a glove assortment and product layout that caters to your customers. For instance, if your shelf space accommodates only a 1-foot configuration (the top row in the image), do not overload that space with small latex gloves if your business mostly services auto technicians who need the chemical protection of nitrile gloves and have larger hands.

Another consideration is where you put the gloves display in the store. To keep customers from having an ah-ha moment at home about a product they should have purchased at your store, put different glove types next to accompanying items in your store. In hardware and paint stores, for example, 90 percent of the products pair well with nitrile gloves. By placing these gloves with related products, you ensure customers get everything they need in one trip. Clip strips and glove project packs (pictured on the left in the above image) are perfect for this task.

Any vendor can sell you gloves. AMMEX is here to help you sell more. Contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor.

AMMEXWhat Your Shelves Say about Your Disposable Gloves
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Not without Gloves: Lacquer and Paint Thinners


Lacquer and paint thinners are harsh solvents that should not be handled without the correct personal protective equipment (PPE). This is because these substances, which are used in the construction, automotive, retail and maritime industries, present several health risks when they are not handled safely.

If certain workers use paint and lacquer thinners without gloves, they may experience dermatitis, skin irritation and numbness in the areas that come in in contact with the solvents. With repeated exposure to the chemicals, the side effects become more severe, ranging from liver disease to an increased risk of cancer, as indicated by material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for these solvents.

With these hazards in mind, always consider the following PPE for safe handling of paint and lacquer thinners:

The importance of disposable gloves
Disposable gloves protect workers’ hands while they use paint and lacquer thinners.

Nitrile gloves are perfect for handling these substances because they stand up to the specific chemicals that are typically found in these solvents. This is because they are made from a petroleum-based synthetic material that is designed to provide chemical resistance. According to an MSDS from GC Electronics, its paint thinner contains a mixture of toluene and hydrotreated naphtha – about 40-50 percent of each. Based on these chemicals, the data sheet recommended nitrile gloves for use because the material is resistant to this mixture.

Lacquer thinner, which has a higher solvency than paint thinner and is therefore a harsher substance, often contains chemicals such as methanol and hexane. Nitrile also provides sufficient resistance to these and other ingredients commonly found in lacquer thinners.

Workers should keep in mind the permeation times for each chemical in these solvents in relation to nitrile. For instance, the naphtha in a mixture will not wear down a nitrile glove quickly, but the permeation time could decrease if the solvent contains methyl ethyl ketone, which is not recommended for use with nitrile gloves. This chemical clearly degrades the glove material. Latex gloves are a better option for handling thinners with methyl ethyl ketone but for only a limited duration per glove pair.

Face masks
Paint and lacquer thinners can be used with spray applicators. Also, they are often present in lacquers and paint to thin those coatings for use with a spray applicator. To reduce the inhalation risk, workers should don N-95-rated face masks. These products will prevent individuals from directly inhaling the solvents during the spraying process. It is important to note face masks address the risk of particles from the spray solutions entering the nose and mouth but do not filter vapors. Depending on the compounds being sprayed, a respirator mask is appropriate for more dangerous chemical use.

The importance of on-site testing and glove changes
When selecting PPE for handling any chemical, it is important to conduct on-site testing. This is particularly true of paint and lacquer thinners, as chemical mixtures for these substances vary by manufacturer. Testing allows workers to have a more accurate picture of permeation times and degradation, which provides a better idea of how often workers must change gloves and which material works best based on the task.

The chemical being sprayed will set the tone for the best glove choice. The GlovePlus HD Heavy Duty Nitrile Exam Gloves are the most commonly used gloves for lacquer and paint thinners.

Stay tuned for the next installment in our series, which will cover the best PPE for salons.

AMMEXNot without Gloves: Lacquer and Paint Thinners
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Avoid Kinks in the Supply Chain with AMMEX


When you place an order with your disposable glove vendor, do you get everything in one shipment? During a busy season, waiting on products on backorder is not good for business, especially if you do not want to lose customers to the competition.

Partnering with AMMEX Corporation, getting the supply you need at the right time is not something you will worry about. We use top-notch supply chain management strategies to ensure your complete order arrives on time.

Understanding fill rate and accuracy
One metric that impacts the supply chain is fill rate. This percentage refers to the ratio of demand compared to the available supply. In other words, when you place an order, how much of that purchase does a vendor have waiting in its inventory to ship to you? Additionally, this refers to a single shipment, so items on backorder affect fill rate.

“AMMEX has a 99.8 percent shipping accuracy.”

Order accuracy is also integral supply chain management. Not only should customers receive 99.8 percent of their purchased items, but they also must receive exactly what they requested. Accuracy errors occur at various stages of the supply chain, which is why the formula for a perfect order accounts for warehousing, procurement, transportation and other stages.

Giving customers the products they want
Disposable gloves are a commodity and need-based product, which means they come with certain expectations. As indicated in John Warrillow’s book “The Automatic Customer,” you as a distributor do not want to deal with unnecessary hassles when maintaining your inventory. You expect all products to arrive at the same time and in a consistent quantity and quality to meet your projected demand. In turn, your customers want these products to be available when they need them. If all goes to plan, this process is a well-oiled machine that requires little attention.

However, if you are working with a vendor with a low fill rate and a overall order accuracy, the process is less harmonious. While you chase down shipments, your customers walk out the door to find another distributor with the products they need. Over time, you may consider the same action with your vendor.

“Shipping accuracy accounts for procurement, warehousing and other stages of the supply chain.”

Getting a worry-free experience with AMMEX
We at AMMEX understand how disruptions in our supply chain would impact your ability to ship orders to your customers on time. This is why one of our four key ideologies is to be consistent in our products and processes.

All of this is possible through proper forecasting. We are poised for significant growth in 2015 and beyond, and we factor that expansion into our supply chain management. This includes accounting for the growth our distributors experience while partnering with us, as well as creating ample room for successful delivery with a four-month lead time for our products, especially gloves.

One element that helps us with our forecasting is the shipping accuracy. While the industrial average is 99.6 percent for orders that are shipped out, AMMEX exceeds that figure at 99.8 percent.

Any vendor can sell you gloves. AMMEX is here to help you sell more and keep your inventory fully stocked. Contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor.

AMMEXAvoid Kinks in the Supply Chain with AMMEX
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Not without Gloves: Perchloroethylene


There are a number of things you shouldn’t touch without gloves, but AMMEX has you covered with superior barrier protection. Perchloroethylene is a non-flammable, colorless, volatile organic compound frequently used in dry cleaning applications. It is also known as tetrachloroethylene, PCE and PERC. While dry cleaning fabrics is the most common use for PERC, it is also used to manufacture other chemicals, such as chlorofluorocarbons, rubber coatings, insulating fluid or cooling gas for electrical transformers, solvent soaps, printing inks, adhesives, leather treatments and automotive cleaners, among others.

Employees may be exposed to PERC if they work in a facility that dry cleans, degreases metal, produces chemicals, manufactures textiles or coats rubber, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

How are employees exposed to PERC?
Although PERC is the most common solvent used in dry cleaning, it poses serious health risks to workers, especially if employees regularly breathe in vapors or their skin comes into contact with the substance. Exposure may immediately lead to dizziness, blistering or irritation of the skin. Over time, exposure may cause loss of coordination, memory loss and delayed reaction times. Some studies have indicated PERC leads to an increased risk for esophageal, cervical, kidney, liver, skin, lung and bladder cancer, as well as lymphoma and leukemia, although it is unclear if other risk factors affect this. Several organizations, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Toxicology Program and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), have classified PERC as a probable human carcinogen. Employees with heart, liver, kidney or lung diseases are at a heightened risk of the effects of PERC.

Dry cleaning workers may be exposed to high levels of this chemical when loading dirty clothes to a machine because contaminated air is forced out. In addition, removing clothes before a cycle is finished, transferring items, cleaning lint traps and changing solvent filters exposes employees to PERC.

How employers combat PERC exposure
Although most PERC-related health problems are caused by inhalation, the chemical may cause irritation after direct contact with the skin. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration limits PERC exposure in the workplace. Over the course of eight hours, workers should be exposed to no more than 100 parts PERC per million (PPM). The maximum PPM is 300. In addition to these federally regulated limits, facilities need to have the right protective gear on hand.

Industrial-grade latex and nitrile gloves protect workers who handle PERC, and face masks should be used to minimize exposure. AMMEX N95 Cone Masks are rated N95 by NIOSH, ensuring a high level of protection for employees.

Stay tuned for our next installment on lacquer thinner.

AMMEXNot without Gloves: Perchloroethylene
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Millimeters to Grams: Change in the Glove Industry


How can you be sure you are choosing the right gloves for the job? Currently, glove performance is measured with millimeter thickness. However, this measurement is not the most accurate due to variations in thickness across a single glove. Disposable gloves are thickest in the fingertips and thinnest in the wrists due to how they are dipped in the manufacturing process.

Thickness measurements in millimeters have the potential to vary based on which part of the glove is measured, which is frequently the palm. The glove industry is transitioning to measuring gloves by weight in grams rather than in millimeters. Gram weight circumvents the variations in thickness across a single glove. With this shift, the terminology will change as well. Rather than labeling gloves as thin, manufacturers will refer to them by their weight or use – such as lightweight or heavy duty.

When did the glove industry start the shift?
Around 2006, lighter weight gloves were introduced for the first time, but they were not well received because the original formulation of the gloves did not provide sufficient barrier protection. In 2009, lightweight gloves with a new formulation were reintroduced, offering more options for clients. Because of changes in technology, lightweight gloves have become more popular, with even 2 mil gloves being acceptable for some uses.

Difference between millimeters and grams
Gloves need to provide barrier protection for the hand. The move to gram measurements would help standardize quality in the glove industry, although gram weight has not been transitioned to the end user yet. It will also provide clearer guidance for glove purchasing decisions because certain weights may be better suited for specific purposes than others. The current standard is 3 mil and premium gloves are 5 mil or higher, but they will need to be measured at the wrist, fingertips and palm. With an allowable 0.3 gram variation in either direction, weight provides a more accurate measurement of gloves. Gram weight also is a more accurate reflection of the amount of material used in a glove and requires only a simple digital scale rather than the use of specific tools, such as a micrometer.

AMMEXMillimeters to Grams: Change in the Glove Industry
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Making the Grade: Posting Food Safety Scores


Consumers have become more concerned about what is in their food and how those products move from farm to table, and government regulators and restaurants around the world have stepped up to keep the public more informed about food safety. This trend is evident through posted food safety scores, which are becoming more visible to consumers.

The public wants to be in the know
Many of today’s consumers are cautious about the steps taken to process and serve their food. Food safety is of growing importance as indicated by widespread protests over genetically modified organisms, calls for improved labeling to detail nutrition facts and the public’s penchant for reading research about food processing to become savvier consumers.

“Food safety scores are becoming more visible to consumers.”

At the restaurant level, establishments are providing the details of their food safety inspections. Not only are consumers happy to have this information, they want to see comprehensive scores. In fact, a crowdfunded study commissioned by Dine Safe King County and conducted by researchers from the University of Washington’s Human Centered Design Department showed consumers want more than an overall pass/fail rating – they desire to see an itemized list of where restaurants are missing the mark.

With this trend in mind, how have regulators and members of food service industry responded?

How inspectors score restaurants
Local health departments assign food safety scores in various ways. These ratings are numerical, pass/fail or denoted with a letter-based grade. New York City, for example, evaluates restaurants using a points system, and point ranges correspond to a letter grade. Each violation accumulates more points, so to earn a passing grade, restaurants want as few points as possible.

To be transparent about these ratings, restaurants publish their scores. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services noted this includes posting the score or the entire report in the establishments.

Lawmakers in San Mateo County, California, implemented a new program to make these posted ratings easier for consumers to understand. This program will color code the score placards to match traffic signals: green means a restaurant passed, yellow indicates a conditional pass and red denotes a closed restaurant.

 

AMMEXMaking the Grade: Posting Food Safety Scores
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Chemical Resistance in Disposable Gloves


When working with certain abrasive chemicals, you need to understand the chemical resistance in disposable gloves and the protection that particular glove materials offer. In addition, length of exposure, conditions and chemical concentration impact the performance of the glove.

Consider degradation and breakthrough time
Gloves are rated on how well they withstand exposure to a certain chemical. Though there is not a standardized test, strength is typically scored by exposing the material to a test chemical. As a glove degrades, it may swell, wrinkle, get stiff or change color. In general, degradation determines whether a glove material is a good fit for a specific application.

In addition to degradation, gloves must be tested for permeation and breakthrough time if a chemical causes specific degradation to latex, nitrile or vinyl. Breakthrough time is the length of time between the initial contact with a chemical and when residue is detected on the inner side of the glove, which indicates how long workers are able to safely where the glove for barrier protection. Permeation is the way a chemical passes through a material on a molecular level without entering through the gloves’ pores, pinholes or other visible openings.

“Nitrile gloves have superior chemical resistance against common chemicals as well as many specialty chemicals, such as water treatment chemicals or industrial cleaning compounds.”

Understanding the conditions of glove use
With any type of glove, the length of exposure and concentration of the chemical may determine how resistant it is. For any intended use, it’s crucial to do on-site testing with any gloves so workers know how to protect themselves, especially if the facility uses chemical mixtures. Gloves are often tested for resistance to one chemical, but they may not be rated against specific mixtures.

For instance, AMMEX Gloveworks Latex Gloves offer barrier protection for food service, health care, dentistry, janitorial and industrial applications. Latex gloves offer secure protection against a variety of chemicals, but latex breaks down over time with continued exposure to certain chemicals, such as ethyl acetate, paint remover and rubber solvent. Latex is resistant to acetone, which may make these gloves a good fit for nail salons, especially compared to other materials.

Nitrile gloves may be better suited for automotive applications because they are more resistant to many of the chemicals used in this type of work such as gasoline and brake fluid. However, for any glove choice, it’s crucial to consider the resistance to specific chemicals that are used on the job.

Distributors who would like to learn more about available product materials, thicknesses and sizes to meet their needs should speak with their AMMEX sales representative or contact us on our website for more information.

AMMEXChemical Resistance in Disposable Gloves
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All about Allergies: Part 2 Synthetics


Natural rubber latex disposable gloves typically get most of the attention when it comes to allergies, but allergic reactions are also possible with synthetic glove materials like nitrile butadiene rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC or vinyl). While allergies to these materials themselves are uncommon, the chemicals used in the production processes are common causes.

During the production of nitrile and vinyl gloves, manufacturers use various substances to turn the base ingredients into the final glove materials. These chemicals are in both the process to form the actual PVC and nitrile and to turn these materials into gloves.

To create vinyl, for example, petroleum is used in the manufacturing process. Petroleum is used to create naphtha, which is combined with other chemicals to form ethylene. The ethylene is combined with chlorine, and through two more transformations, this combination becomes polyvinyl chloride.

Allergy tiggers
With latex gloves, the allergic reactions usually stem from the proteins in the latex. With synthetics, the issue lies with the petroleum. While rare, petroleum allergies do occur in some individuals.

As a result of contact with the glove materials, individuals with petroleum allergies experience contact dermatitis, which may lead to skin irritation, hives, redness and blistering in more extreme cases. Respiratory effects, such as throat itching, coughing and wheezing, appear with allergic reactions to petroleum gas but not commonly with petroleum-based gloves.

“If certain individuals wear a glove that is too-tight, the skin will not be able to breathe inside the glove which may cause an irritation.”

Acknowledging indirect causes of irritation
Although petroleum allergies are rare, some nitrile and vinyl glove wearers will experience contact dermatitis. However, this reaction does not always occur because of the glove materials.

One common issue is an irritative substance on the hands. Certain substances, such as residual hand soap or a scented lotion, will not cause too much of a problem on an exposed hand, but the associated reaction to it will be more pronounced in some individuals when they have a glove pressing the substance to their skin.

This issue is more evident when a glove is too small. Overall, too-tight gloves create irritation and discomfort as the skin is unable to breathe inside the glove.

Key points about glove material allergies
Whether it is latex, nitrile or vinyl, glove users must ensure they have the right gloves for the job. This applies to selecting the right material for the application as well as the appropriate size.

Additionally, as individuals and employers attempt to accommodate allergies, they must also consider how the alternative glove materials will fare in their work environments.  For a wide variety of glove options ranging in material, thickness, and sizing contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to learn more.

AMMEXAll about Allergies: Part 2 Synthetics
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