Not Without Gloves: Pesticides


Pesticides should always be handled with the proper barrier protection. Different formulations target various organisms, such as insects, rodents, algae, weeds and fungi. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates the use of all pesticides and requires chemicals that have been registered for many years to be reassessed to ensure they meet current standards.

Pesticides typically come in organic or inorganic solutions with an active ingredient. Although some pesticide formulas are less toxic than others, they are still hazardous to human health in high levels, and anyone handling these products must protect themselves. Here are some of the hazardous chemicals commonly found in pesticides and effective gloves for handling each:

Naphthalene
Naphthalene is made from crude oil, coal tar or created when other chemicals burn. It was the first registered pesticide in the U.S. in 1948. Because this chemical is found in mothballs, it has been shown to cause anemia in infants when the clothing was not washed prior to wear, according to the National Pesticide Information Center at Oregon State University. It has been linked to anemia in adults as well. Although naphthalene breaks down in the environment over time, workers should wear gloves when handling pesticides that contain this chemical.

Latex, nitrile and vinyl gloves are all resistant to naphthalene. Because these types of gloves all provide protection from this chemical, it is easier for companies to accommodate people with latex sensitivities.

Paradichlorobenzene
Another common insecticide, paradichlorobenzene causes a burning sensation on the skin after prolonged contact. Nitrile gloves are recommended protection from skin exposure to this toxin.

Capsaicin
Even naturally occurring chemicals can cause harm. Capsaicin, for example, is a naturally occurring chemical that gives chili peppers their heat. It is used to deter mites, insects and animals. While it is safe for humans to eat, it may irritate the skin or eyes upon contact, especially when highly concentrated. The effects are temporary and it is considered a safer pesticide because it is a naturally occurring substance, but skin contact may cause pain. High concentrations of capsaicin may burn through latex gloves in a short time. Nitrile gloves provide greater protection from this harsh substance.

For any pesticide, it is important to know the solution’s chemical composition and then test disposal work gloves for resistance to identify safe exposure levels. Contact your AMMEX representative or contact us on our website to learn more about the right barrier protection and add gloves to your line up.

AMMEXNot Without Gloves: Pesticides
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Chemical Resistance in Disposable Gloves


When working with certain abrasive chemicals, you need to understand the chemical resistance in disposable gloves and the protection that particular glove materials offer. In addition, length of exposure, conditions and chemical concentration impact the performance of the glove.

Consider degradation and breakthrough time
Gloves are rated on how well they withstand exposure to a certain chemical. Though there is not a standardized test, strength is typically scored by exposing the material to a test chemical. As a glove degrades, it may swell, wrinkle, get stiff or change color. In general, degradation determines whether a glove material is a good fit for a specific application.

In addition to degradation, gloves must be tested for permeation and breakthrough time if a chemical causes specific degradation to latex, nitrile or vinyl. Breakthrough time is the length of time between the initial contact with a chemical and when residue is detected on the inner side of the glove, which indicates how long workers are able to safely where the glove for barrier protection. Permeation is the way a chemical passes through a material on a molecular level without entering through the gloves’ pores, pinholes or other visible openings.

“Nitrile gloves have superior chemical resistance against common chemicals as well as many specialty chemicals, such as water treatment chemicals or industrial cleaning compounds.”

Understanding the conditions of glove use
With any type of glove, the length of exposure and concentration of the chemical may determine how resistant it is. For any intended use, it’s crucial to do on-site testing with any gloves so workers know how to protect themselves, especially if the facility uses chemical mixtures. Gloves are often tested for resistance to one chemical, but they may not be rated against specific mixtures.

For instance, AMMEX Gloveworks Latex Gloves offer barrier protection for food service, health care, dentistry, janitorial and industrial applications. Latex gloves offer secure protection against a variety of chemicals, but latex breaks down over time with continued exposure to certain chemicals, such as ethyl acetate, paint remover and rubber solvent. Latex is resistant to acetone, which may make these gloves a good fit for nail salons, especially compared to other materials.

Nitrile gloves may be better suited for automotive applications because they are more resistant to many of the chemicals used in this type of work such as gasoline and brake fluid. However, for any glove choice, it’s crucial to consider the resistance to specific chemicals that are used on the job.

Distributors who would like to learn more about available product materials, thicknesses and sizes to meet their needs should speak with their AMMEX sales representative or contact us on our website for more information.

AMMEXChemical Resistance in Disposable Gloves
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Spring is the Busiest Season for Landscapers


Now that the snow has finally melted and the grass is starting to grow again, many people are starting to think about sprucing up their yards and gardens. Landscaping companies may field a higher volume of calls than normal. Therefore, it is important to have the right gear on hand for landscaping projects.

Even places that have been hit by recent droughts, such as California, are considering new landscaping options. Due to water restrictions that are in affect, many residents are thinking about replacing the existing flowers, shrubbery and grass in their yards with desert plants that require less water, according to Palm Springs CBS affiliate KESQ.

Landscapers must be sure to have all the protective gear they need at the ready to complete their contracted projects. Workers need the right gloves to protect their skin from thorns, fertilizers and pesticides. Gloveworks HD Orange Nitrile Glovesstretch synthetic vinyl gloves and GPX3 vinyl gloves are chemically resistant barriers for handling lawn and garden chemicals. Dipped work gloves are also perfect for landscapers. In addition, companies may need face masks to prevent employees from breathing in dirt and dust.

No matter how big or small the landscaping job, companies should be properly equipped with personal protective equipment to handle the task.

For more information, follow this link.

AMMEXSpring is the Busiest Season for Landscapers
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Barrier Protection Needs in the Beauty Industry


Whether customers seek no-chip manicures or a relaxing foot massage, nail and beauty technicians need barrier protection to guard themselves against harsh chemicals and pathogens. This presents a large sales opportunity for distributors of disposable gloves and masks.

Not only are salon owners looking out for the safety of their employees, but they are also liable to regulations from the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA). These best practices and rules are in place for a good reason.

The chemicals used by technicians include acetone, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone and isopropyl acetate. Prolonged exposure to these substances via skin contact or breathing in the vapors leads to symptoms such as:

  • Dizziness
  • Skin, eye, mouth and nose irritation
  • Burns
  • Harm to fetuses of pregnant technicians
  • Difficulties concentrating
  • Coughing fits and asthma attacks
  • Kidney and liver damage

With regard to biological risks, employees need protection against bloodborne pathogens.

To address these risks, salon owners should purchase a few types of barrier protection:

Disposable gloves
Several glove materials are fitting for the safety risks present in salons. Latex gloves, such as the LX3 and Gloveworks Industrial Latex, are suitable for guarding against chemicals and pathogens.

However, because of the growing prevalence of latex allergies, the industry is trending toward non-latex gloves, such as nitrile and vinyl. Though nitrile gloves, such as the X3, X3D, and AMMEX Indigo Nitrile Exam Gloves, are not recommended for use with acetone, technicians are able to use these gloves because they have limited exposure to the chemical. Stretch synthetic vinyl gloves are also suitable. With these alternatives, neither workers or customers are exposed to latex.

“Gloves protect nail technicians from pathogens and harsh chemicals.”

Masks
Not all masks provide equal results in nail and beauty salons. Many salons use ear loop face masks (ELFMs), which also protect customers from what workers exhale.

N95-rated masks are filtering face pieces. These products, such as the N95 face mask, are useful for nail buffing and applying acrylic powders because they filter out germs and dusts. To fully realize this protection, workers must have properly fitted masks. They will find proper fitting information on the mask packaging.

Reaching the wide open market
With the aforementioned information in mind, it’s not hard to see why the more than 375,000 nail technicians in the U.S. need barrier protection. Distributors who would like to learn more about products that are suitable for their salon clients should speak with their AMMEX sales representative or contact us on our website for more information.

AMMEXBarrier Protection Needs in the Beauty Industry
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What to Know: OSHA’s Change MSDSs to SDSs


In 2012, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). The revision sought to make the HCS align more closely with international compliance and provide a more standardized approach to the formatting of OSHA’s material safety data sheets (MSDSs), which will transition to safety data sheets (SDSs). Additionally, the update implemented new labeling requirements. These changes will make the HCS closer to standards of the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).

OSHA is introducing the update gradually. The implementation period started Dec. 1, 2013 and ends June 1, 2016. Employers must be compliant with the SDSs requirement by June 1, 2015.

What the revised HCS entails
The new provisions pertain to distributors, importers and manufacturers of chemicals. While the goal of the HCS, which is to give end users information about hazardous chemicals in products, remains the same, OSHA revised the standard to make the information more accessible. Per OSHA’s standards, these chemicals are:

  • Pyrophoric gases
  • Combustible dust
  • Simple asphyxiants
  • Health or safety hazards for any other reason

Manufacturers, distributors and importers must now communicate these hazards to end users via SDSs, which are largely the same as MSDSs. The key change is the new forms use a 16-section format to make the information easy to digest.

“Employers must be compliant with the SDSs requirement by June 1.”

Overview of the 16 sections
Sections 12 through 15 are the ones that specifically align with the GHS. The preceding sections detail information about the chemicals as well as control measures. The final section is for any other pertinent data.

The sections cover a number of issues. Sections 4, 5 and 6, for instance, list steps for responding to emergencies stemming from the chemical. These include first-aid, firefighting and accidental release measures.

Other sections define the nature of a chemical. What is it and what hazards are associated with it? If the chemical is a substance or mixture, what are the ingredients? What are the physical and chemical properties? These and other factors are covered in Sections 1, 2, 3, 9, 10, 11 and 12.

Other factors addressed in the SDSs include disposal guidelines, storage guidelines, associated regulations and shipping restrictions and requirements.

Caveats to the rules
OSHA has some exceptions to its new rules for SDSs. One particularly important designation is the exemption relating to articles. These items are exempt from the regulations because they do not release the chemical used in their development or present an exposure risk by any other means. For example, nitrile gloves do not need SDSs.

SDS regulations apply to several parts of the supply chain.

For items to be classified as articles, they must meet additional criteria. The product must have a specific design or shape that defines its end use. Disposable gloves are shaped to fit hands and provide barrier protection for those body parts, so they are articles.

One glove-specific exemption is medical-grade gloves. Unlike industrial-grade gloves, which receive oversight from OSHA, these products fall under the purview of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are therefore not liable to the HCS provisions.

How this affects AMMEX and our distributors
AMMEX is currently updating our MSDSs to SDSs. Both distributors and customers have inquired about when the change will be finalized. Per the OSHA deadlines, we encourage all vendors to ensure their products are compliant by the June 1 deadline.

AMMEXWhat to Know: OSHA’s Change MSDSs to SDSs
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It’s Time to Suit Up for Spring Cleaning


Dust bunnies, grime and clutter accumulate throughout winter, and it is time to attack these issues head on now that the weather has improved to allow for open windows. However, before you get started with eradicating the messes around your house, you must acquire the right gear for the job.

Your wash bucket will be full of cleaners, rags, scrub brushes and other items to give your home a new shine for spring. Do not forget to grab the appropriate attire as well. Before you start cleaning, slip on a pair of disposable gloves to protect your skin. You may think there are not any serious consequences from touching cleaners and old dirt, but the opposite is true.

In fact, there are a number of items you should not touch without wearing gloves. Here are a few:

“Bleach is corrosive to your skin.”

Bleach
In addition to making your white clothes whiter, bleach also serves as a cleaning and disinfecting agent. Whether you are pouring a little into your dishwater or a bucket for mopping the floor, bleach is a useful substance to have on hand. Yet you must use it in moderation. If you use too much, getting a headache from the smell is not the only risk you face.

Bleach is a mixture of water and sodium hypochlorite that comes in various concentrations. Because sodium hypochlorite is an oxidizing agent, it is corrosive to your skin. Low concentrations may not produce noticeable effects, but higher concentrations or continuous exposure to low concentrations could lead to reactions that include skin irritation, burning and itching.

Even if you are using bleach for only a short amount of time, wear a pair of gloves. Nitrile gloves, for instance, are the best option for chemical resistance.

Detergents
These substances come into play when you are washing dishes, mopping, washing your car, cleaning your home’s windows and for other uses.

Most detergents are mild but over time, the effects are more serious than pruney skin. These substances dry out your skin and will lead to irritation following prolonged contact. Grab a pair of gloves before you wash your car, mop your floor or tackle the tower of dishes piling up by your sink.

Mold
Mold is a problem in many homes. Often, the presence of mold goes undetected because it grows unbeknownst to homeowners – hiding behind walls and in dark corners of attics and basements. If your home has moisture, leaks or flooding issues, you likely have mold growing somewhere in the property.

During winter, your risk for mold may increase. One of the best ways to improve your indoor air quality and minimize mold is to keep your windows open, especially when you shower and the steam causes moisture to accumulate in the bathroom. However, with the cold weather, your windows are closed for a few months. If you have not been using your exhaust fan – or your bathroom doesn’t have one – your bathroom may develop mold.

For significant mold growth, you must contact professionals to take care of the removal, but for small patches, it is safe to handle the cleaning yourself. Wear gloves when cleaning mold. Not only are there health issues that arise if you touch mold with your bare hands, including skin irritation, but also you need to protect your hands from the detergent or bleach you use to clean the mold. Furthermore, wear an N95-rated mask to avoid breathing in mold spores.

“Disposable gloves protect your hands from harsh chemicals, mold and pathogens while you clean.”

Animals
Due to the cold temperatures, small animals may have burrowed into your house or garage to find a warm place to live. While many of the animals will venture back out into the world once the weather becomes warmer, some will not have survived.

If you come across dead mice, rats or other animals, do not touch them with your bare hands. Also, wear gloves when cleaning the areas where you found these creatures. Many rodents carry pathogens, such as hantavirus, which spread through rodent droppings. That’s why it’s important to wear gloves and a mask. You must stay healthy to tackle all of your other spring cleaning chores.

These are just a few situations when you should wear gloves while cleaning your house to prepare for spring, and there is nothing wrong with putting gloves on for other purposes. Maybe you just want to feel like a superhero while you clean.

AMMEXIt’s Time to Suit Up for Spring Cleaning
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With Spring Comes Warmth and New Hair Colors


Although winter is using its icy grip to claw at the early days of spring, warmer weather is coming, and with it comes new trends in hair color. As numerous clients come in seeking a new hue for their hairdos, salons should stock up on disposable gloves.

Celebrities typically set the tone for popular hair colors and styles, and this spring will see inspiration from Kim Kardashian, Miley Cyrus and Amy Adams, according to Forbes. Platinum blonde may be coming back in a big way, and bold contrast between roots and tips has become popular. Rose-colored hair is also making headway, according to Style magazine.

Not only are stylists going to perform the initial coloring, they will also see clients for routine maintenance. With multiple coloring appointments and the use of many chemicals, stylists need a pair of gloves that is up to the task. Vinyl gloves are perfect for this application, as they provide protection against coloring agents and other styling chemicals and are affordable for numerous glove changes. Alternatively, black nitrile gloves are a great option to mask the discoloration of gloves by the hair color and dye.

Whether clients want to welcome spring with a few highlights or the pixel hair color craze that is sweeping the Internet, stylists should protect their hands while they tackle the expanded business.

For more information, follow this link.

AMMEXWith Spring Comes Warmth and New Hair Colors
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Are you Ready for Spring Cleaning?


As temperatures begin to rise across the country, many Americans are ready to throw open their windows and rid their residences of stale air and old dust that accumulated during winter.

Kate Strauss, president of Grand Forks, North Dakota-based cleaning service Maid Simple, told Inforum getting your supplies together is the first step to starting spring cleaning, which means you need a fresh supply of disposable gloves. Before using chemicals and harsh detergents, removing mold or tossing out that mystery container of food at the back of your fridge, safeguard yourself with the right barrier protection.

This is particularly important if you risk coming across rodent droppings while cleaning. In Washington, for instance, state health officials warned residents to be careful if they encounter signs of rodents while cleaning, as these small animals carry hantavirus and other diseases, The Associated Press reported. Spring cleaning is a high-risk activity for hantavirus because many people unknowingly stumble upon infected surfaces.

To protect yourself – and your family or community if you are conducting a team effort – from harmful bacteria and contact with harsh cleaning solutions, make sure your cleaning supply bucket has ample disposable gloves.

For more information, click this link.

AMMEXAre you Ready for Spring Cleaning?
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Gear up for St. Patrick’s Day


St. Patrick’s Day is right around the corner, and you should stock up on disposable gloves in addition to green apparel, decorations and beer. Gloves will be out in force as much as the parade-goers March 17 – and the day after.

Many revelers will be dying or painting hair, paper mache decorations and other items green, and they need gloves to keep the chemical dyes off their hands.

After getting their emerald apparel and decorations together, many Americans will have a hankering for corned beef and cabbage, keeping restaurants and pubs across the nation busy on St. Patrick’s day. As customers crowd into these venues, food service workers will need an ample supply of barrier protection on hand.

While corned beef and cabbage is a staple of St. Paddy’s Day cuisine, it is not the only common sight around the holiday. Many cities, food service venues and others will be cleaning up after all the festivities and will need ample supplies of gloves for the task. For instance, Chicago, which has an iconic celebration that includes dying the Chicago river green, expects 500,000 people to attend the festivities, according to Medill Reports Chicago, and cleanup crews will need the right supplies, including gloves, to pick up behind the revelers.

Many will claim the luck of the Irish on St. Patrick’s Day, but certain things should not be left to chance. Make sure you have the gloves you need.

AMMEXGear up for St. Patrick’s Day
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March Madness: Team Vinyl


Do you want a disposable glove lineup with the balanced stats you need to score a bucket for barrier protection every time? If so, look no further than Team Vinyl. These gloves know how to play the game from inside and beyond the arc as well as on offense and defense to keep harmful chemicals and pathogens at bay.

Here is our starting lineup for Team Vinyl:

“The star players for Team Vinyl are great for food service and janitorial-sanitation applications.”

Antimicrobial
This player is all about containing the offense, as it inhibits the growth of microorganisms. Antimicrobial Vinyl Gloves, which are a fan favorite in food service and janitorial-sanitation, help prevent cross-contamination by double teaming pathogens on the court.

Stretch synthetic
These gloves, which are also great for food service, have the feel and fit of latex without the allergy concerns. Plus, Stretch Synthetic Vinyl Gloves are a low-cost solution, leaving more in your wallet to bet on brackets.

Blue vinyl
When the defense has a player wrapped up, it can be hard to see an open player for the pass. That is not the case with Blue Vinyl Gloves. With the vibrant color, you will always be able to spot a glove.

With Team Vinyl, you get an all-around lineup of barrier protection superstars.

AMMEXMarch Madness: Team Vinyl
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