Tap into Disposable Glove Opportunities in Baseball


It’s Spring and America’s favorite pastime, baseball is in full swing!  For baseball fans everywhere the Major League Baseball season brings back the thrills of home runs on perfectly maintained turfs, tasty concession-stand foods and the fan camaraderie in the bleachers. But when the game ends and the last fans leave, another game starts – hundreds of workers labor overnight to clean up the stadium, restock the concession stands and meticulously groom the field – all before the next baseball game.  The baseball season means revenue opportunities for smart distributors of disposable gloves and barrier protection products. The Opening Day lineup is crucial for a fast start in baseball and in business. Are you ready for an early winning streak this quarter? Tap into disposable glove opportunities in baseball – Three ways you can grow your glove sales with AMMEX.

Concession Stand Food Service 

What is baseball without hot dogs, peanuts, and popcorn? Did you know that the National Hot Dog & Sausage Council (NHDSC),estimates that baseball fans will consume more than 19.4 million hot dogs this year at stadiums across the country?  To avoid contamination, concession stand food service workers need disposable gloves to handle hot dogs and other foods at the concession stand.  Food service gloves such as loose-fitting poly gloves or polyethylene gloves are ideal since they easy to don and doff when switching between tasks or even between customers. Another popular choice for food service employees are vinyl gloves which are ideal in cases where greater dexterity is needed, closer-fitting vinyl gloves come in handy.  In the food service industry, workers on average use up to 20 pairs of disposable gloves per day.  But consider the food service velocity in a baseball stadium and imagine the possibilities for increased sales with poly and vinyl food service gloves.

An average baseball hot dog vendor sells about 150 hot dogs per game and 10,000 to 12,000 hot dogs per season. How many disposable gloves will an average baseball food vendor need?”

Groundskeepers

Most of the time, fans only see groundskeepers resetting the field during the seventh inning stretch, or scrambling to cover the field during a sudden rain storm. However, a great deal of work goes into maintaining that field when players and spectators are absent.  Most fields are still made of grass rather than AstroTurf, which means groundskeepers must maintain it on a day-to-day basis.   Did you know that you can earn a college degree in Turfgrass Management, a Master’s degree, and a Ph.D.?  There’s a lot of work involved in maintaining a sports field than most people would imagine. To keep a fresh green appearance, groundskeepers apply pesticides and other chemicals that could irritate or damage hands of workers.

Disposable nitrile gloves such as AMMEX Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile provide a protective barrier against chemicals and are still strong enough to protect from other irritants. In other situations, like removing thorny plants from the field, groundskeepers may need a more heavy-duty work glove like nitrile dipped or latex dipped work gloves. Tap into disposable glove opportunities in baseball – Opportunities are everywhere, from nitrile and latex disposable gloves for tasks on the turf to nitrile and latex dipped work gloves for tougher groundskeeping jobs.

JanSan Cleanup Crew

Once the crowds leave, another crowd descends on the stadium – janitorial and sanitation crews work overnight to clean up after thousands of fans. According to data from Business Insider, the average MLB ballpark is 2.49 acres, or more than 100,000 square feet, which provide endless opportunities for disposable nitrile, vinyl, and latex gloves.  All in all, cleaning up a stadium is hard work, and it is not only the seats that need attention. Janitorial staff also need to attend to bathrooms and hallways, while concession staff scrub and sanitize their areas for the night. All of these activities require disposable gloves of varying thicknesses. In the janitorial and sanitation industry employees use gloves for various reasons, including protection from harsh chemicals and pathogens. Additionally, they use an average of 15 pairs per day but consider the magnitude of the crowds and surface space in baseball stadiums.

“The average capacity of the top 20 baseball stadiums is 40,000 fans.”  How many disposable gloves are needed to clean up after that crowd?”

Janitorial staff commonly use strong cleaning chemicals in the line of duty. Glass and metal cleaners that include hydrofluoric acid, nitrilotriacetate, and phosphoric acid could cause burns or irritation if proper protective barrier such as heavy duty nitrile gloves is not worn. Bleach is one of the most common cleaning chemicals but it is also highly corrosive to the skin.  In the janitorial and sanitation industry vinyl disposable gloves, are another good option because they are economically priced but still generally provide enough chemical resistance. Vinyl gloves protect hands against hydrofluoric, phosphoric and 10 percent concentrated nitric acids. Nitrile gloves provide even greater chemical resistance and are less likely to tear.  With the potential for vinyl, nitrile and latex glove sales, distributors do not want to miss out on the many sales opportunities in the Jan-san industry.

Disposable glove sales opportunity is everywhere including baseball stadiums – from food service workers, janitorial and sanitation crews’ and groundskeepers – Tap into disposable glove opportunities in baseball and grow your glove sales with AMMEX.  Become an AMMEX Distributor today!  If you are already a distributor, speak with your dedicated sales representative to discover the advantages of our Sales Acceleration Solution®.  Stay informed on industry trends by following us on Facebook.

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Help Prevent Norovirus Outbreaks in the Food Service Industry


The Norovirus is commonly associated with wide-spread illness that occurs on cruise ships, but those account for only about 1% of all reported norovirus outbreaks. Recent news of Norovirus affecting a popular restaurant chain confirms that it can occur anywhere people gather or food is served.  Infected people can spread norovirus to others through close contact or by contaminating food and surfaces. Food service workers who have the norovirus can contaminate food and make many people sick. However, there are ways to help prevent norovirus outbreaks in the food service industry such as following food service safety practices like proper barrier protection and hygiene policies.

A Boston-area Chipotle has been shut down temporarily after an employee was diagnosed with norovirus and two others reported similar symptoms,CBS Boston reports.

News such as this highlights the facts that the Norovirus, is highly contagious – often spread by infected food service workers – and immediate action should be taken to help prevent norovirus outbreaks in the food service industry.

Consider these Norovirus statistics from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-IndustryAbout 20 million people get sick from norovirus each year

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-Industry#1 cause of outbreaks from contaminated food in the US.

Help-Prevent-Norovirus-Outbreaks-in-the-Food-Service-IndustryInfected food workers cause about 70% of reported outbreaks

Norovirus outbreaks from contaminated food are common in the food service industry because food service industry workers often go to work when they are sick and may contaminate food.  Of outbreaks caused by infected food workers, 54% involve food workers touching ready-to-eat-foods with their bare hands. Ready-to-eat foods are foods that are ready to be served without additional preparation, such as washed raw fruits and vegetables for salads or sandwiches, baked goods, or items that have already been cooked.

Observations of food service workers have shown that they practice proper hand washing only 1 in 4 times.

Norovirus is hard to kill and stays on food, kitchen surfaces, and utensils. It can remain infectious on foods even at freezing temperatures and until heated above 140°F and can stay on countertops and serving utensils for up to 2 weeks.  Norovirus can also be resistant to many common disinfectants and hand sanitizers.

What can be done to help prevent norovirus outbreaks in the food service industry?

Food service industry can

  • Adhere to food safety laws and regulations.
  • Certify kitchen managers and train food service workers in food safety practices.
  • Establish policies that require workers to stay home while sick with vomiting and diarrhea for at least 48 hours after symptoms stop.
  • Foster a work environment that encourages workers to stay home when sick, by considering such measures such as paid sick leave and a staffing plan that includes on-call workers.

Food service workers can

  • Tell a manager when sick with symptoms of norovirus such as vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Wash hands carefully and often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the restroom.
  • Use single-use disposable gloves to avoid touching ready-to-eat foods with bare hands.
  • Regularly clean and sanitize kitchen surfaces and frequently touched objects, using a chlorine based product or other sanitizer approved by the Environmental Protection Agency for use against norovirus.
  • Immediately block off, clean, and disinfect areas where there has been a vomiting or diarrheal incident.
  • Carefully wash fruits and vegetables and avoid serving undercooked (below 140°F) oysters and other shellfish.
  • Visit www.FoodSafety.gov for the latest information.

Due to the nature of the food service industry – where workers directly handle food  – disposable glove usage in this sector is common. The U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) requires all employees to wash their hands if they make contact with food. However, when it comes to the prevention of norovirus, food service disposable gloves are the most effective barrier protection according to the CDC – it helps to prevent the spread of the norovirus.

The CDC strongly recommends food workers use disposable gloves to avoid touching food with bare hands.

Food service disposable gloves, such as polyethylene gloves commonly referred to as poly gloves are a popular choice in the food service industry.  Disposable poly gloves such as, AMMEX Poly are ideal for food service since they are single-use and workers tend to switch between various light-duty tasks, and they need a disposable glove that can accommodate their workflow.

Another popular single-use disposable glove for food service is polyvinyl chloride (PVC), also known as vinyl.  Disposable gloves such as AMMEX AntiMicrobial Vinyl are single use, FDA approved for food service and they contain an antimicrobial agent to help inhibit the growth of microorganisms.

Regardless of which disposable gloves food service workers use, poly, vinyl, and latex disposable gloves are a smart investment for the food service industry.  Food service disposable gloves can help prevent norovirus outbreaks in the food service industry – protecting workers and consumers against foodborne illness – And helps to protect businesses against tarnished reputations and decreased profits when restaurants have to close due to outbreaks.  Thousands of distributors rely on AMMEX to supply their customers in the food service industry with high-quality AMMEX disposable gloves. Contact us today to become an AMMEX distributor and learn how we help our distributors grow their glove sales on average of 31%!

AMMEXHelp Prevent Norovirus Outbreaks in the Food Service Industry
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March Madness Team Latex

 While a team full of young guns can bring a new pace and finesse to the court, veteran squads like AMMEX’s X3 series Team Latex have been playing the barrier protection game for years. These latex gloves are the oldest of all the teams in our March Madness lineup but do not think their skills have dwindled with age.  Here is our starting lineup for March Madness Team Latex

HD Industrial and HD Exam Latex
These two players are cut from the same cloth – both are able to stay in the game for longer because of their thickness. The HD Industrial latex gloves and HD Exam latex disposable gloves are twins, with the former playing best within the industrial sector and the latter dominating the medical industry. Plus, when it comes to fit and feel, these two latex gloves are all-stars.

“March Madness Team Latex is full of veteran players.”

Gloveworks Heavy Duty Latex is an industrial grade glove that is more than twice as thick as a standard disposable latex glove. With enhanced puncture resistance, each glove has a longer duration of use so you don’t have to switch gloves as often during tough jobs. Latex gloves feature more elasticity than nitrile, and better puncture resistance than vinyl. The textured surface of the glove will give you an enhanced grip in wet and dry conditions. It’s also powder free, so you don’t have to worry about messy powder residue.

AMMEX Heavy Duty Latex Exam Gloves are powder free featuring a smooth interior for easy donning and a textured surface for an outstanding grip. These latex gloves are twice as strong as standard disposable gloves. AMMEX HD latex disposable gloves are perfect for your more demanding tasks and are commonly used for medical and dental applications, food processing, janitorial, and in laboratory settings.

LX3 
If you want that player that can move around the court and provide exceptional dexterity, AMMEX’s X3 series have the skills you need, including the LX3 Latex gloves. They are thinner than their teammates, providing more tactile sensitivity and a full range of motion. Also, these gloves come with a polymer coating for easier donning. X3 is an all around solid contender on the court.

AMMEX LX3 Latex disposable gloves are well suited for all industrial applications where excellent dexterity and comfort is required. These gloves are commonly used for painting, janitorial, manufacturing and food service.  LX3 latex is also more elastic than nitrile and features excellent chemical resistance against various acids and bases.  LX3 industrial latex disposable gloves feature a fully textured palm and fingertips providing a strong grip in wet or dry conditions.

“Boost your Brackets with Team Latex”

While some will see their brackets fall to pieces, others will play to win. Why take a gamble when the perfect barrier protection is your best bet?Contact us to today to become a distributor and add Team Latex to your player line-up!

AMMEXMarch Madness Team Latex
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The Right Gloves for the Job: Part III Food Service

The Right Gloves for the Job:  Part III Food Service – The food service industry has many of the same hygiene and contamination concerns of the food processing industry. Food service encompasses anywhere food is served. Sit-down restaurants, food trucks and college campus cafeterias are all part of the food service industry. In these and similar locations, food is prepared and served, and consumers often see workers having direct contact with the food.

Due to the nature of the food service industry – workers directly hand food to consumers – disposable glove usage in this sector is common. The U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) requires all employees to wash their hands if they make contact with food. However, employers can only partially monitor their employees hand washing practices and hand washing may not always be enough to stop the spread of germs from hands to food.  Disposable food service gloves are useful in the food service industry because employers can visibly monitor their workers’ food safety practices, and consumers get peace of mind that there is a barrier between food service employees’ hands and their food.

“The FDA recommends the use of barrier protection such as disposable food service gloves to stop the spread of germs in the food service industry.”

 

One key facet of the food service industry is workers tend to switch between various light-duty tasks, and they need a disposable glove material that can accommodate their workflow. That is where polyethylene (PE), also known as poly, and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), also known as vinyl, gloves come in.

“Poly gloves have a looser fit so they are easier to don and doff.”

A looser fit at an affordable price with poly gloves
To avoid cross contamination, food service employees switch gloves often. If an employee were to go from preparing food to serving food, for instance, he or she would need to change gloves. Given the fast pace that can be common in this industry – during a lunch-hour rush, for example – these workers need a glove they can slip on and off quickly. For instance, sandwich shop workers use new gloves for each customer.

Poly gloves, which are latex free, fit this description. Disposable food service gloves are made from two sheets of polyethylene film. The sheets are seamed and sealed with heat to create the gloves.This glove material is thin and inexpensive. Considering employees switch gloves often, there is no need to use a more heavy-duty glove material such as nitrile or latex. Poly gloves are powder free. They do not conform to the hand as closely as other glove materials for easy donning and doffing. However, this feature also means less dexterity, but the gloves can be textured for better grip.

“There are antimicrobial versions of vinyl gloves, which stop the growth of microorganisms.“

More dexterity with vinyl gloves
A staple in the food processing industry, latex-free, powder-free vinyl disposable gloves are a staple in the food service industry. Like poly gloves, vinyl products are affordable and suitable for both food processing and food service applications. There are also antimicrobial vinyl gloves, which stop the growth of microorganisms. This feature is beneficial for preventing the spread of harmful bacteria that can contaminate the glove and other surfaces.

Vinyl gloves have two advantages compared to poly gloves: They conform more closely to the hand and provide better dexterity. If an employee needs to handle a small amount of garnish, for example, he or she can have an easier time grasping the correct amount with vinyl gloves.

Why not latex or nitrile?
As with any industry, end users and consumers can have latex allergies. Even if employees are able to wear the gloves without trouble, they could transfer latex proteins to the foods they handle, thereby causing a consumer to experience an allergic reaction. Nitrile is latex free, but its level of durability and price are not practice for gloves that are going to be changed often.

In the end, poly and vinyl gloves offer the value and ease food service workers need.  Become an AMMEX distributor today to add poly or vinyl disposable food service gloves to your product lineup.

AMMEXThe Right Gloves for the Job: Part III Food Service
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