Lose Weight in the New Year!


This is the year you will keep your promise to lose weight, and this does not refer to shedding a few pounds at the gym. Rather, this is the year glove distributors and end users are learning about the benefits and uses of lightweight disposable gloves.

The quest for cost savings
Like many innovations, the push for higher-quality lightweight gloves stemmed from a desire to reduce costs. The price of the raw materials needed for various glove types was high, which prompted manufacturers to seek out a way to get more gloves from the same amount of raw materials.

Beginning in 2009 and gaining momentum every year, the lagging economy has caused end users to look for more economical options. As factories developed new formulas, light weight gloves have become a viable option. There was some initial hesitation that perhaps the gloves were too thin, but they have proven themselves in most industries.

Comfort and lower cost through innovation
With time, technology improved, allowing for strong yet lighter weight gloves.

Now, lightweight gloves provide a lower price without sacrificing durability for short-duration tasks. Additionally, these gloves are more comfortable because they offer greater flexibility and tactile sensitivity.

Lightweight gloves have been a tremendous success for both importers and distributors. In fact, 3 millimeter gloves now serve as the standard, and the 4-5 millimeter gloves are premium grade. With quality, performance and competitive pricing, these gloves meet the level of performance end users are looking for at a budget-friendly price.

Lightweight gloves are best for short-duration tasks where glove changes occur often.”

Get the right glove for the job
The benefits of lightweight gloves vary depending on the application. Thinner material means less durability compared to a thick glove. This is why these gloves are best for short-duration tasks where glove changes occur often.

Heavier gloves are more suited for heavy duty, long-duration tasks. In automotive repair shops or industrial facilities where glove wearers handle many tools, for example, more durable gloves are best. This also applies to dealing with harsh chemicals where a thicker glove allows workers to wear the same glove for longer-duration use.

Out with the old, in with the new
This year will be full of changes, and one transition is the glove industry is moving away from measuring gloves with regard to millimeter thickness to using weight in grams instead. With this change, the language will transition from thinner gloves to lightweight gloves. This is because thickness measurements depend on where the glove is measured – gloves are thickest at the fingertips and thinner in the palm. Grams, on the other hand, give overall weight of the entire glove.

Not only does this provide clearer information for glove purchase decisions, but it also helps with standardizing quality. So whether you are looking to gradually drop a few grams throughout the year or shed a lot of weight in short time, look to lightweight gloves to provide the comfort, price and quality you require.

AMMEXLose Weight in the New Year!
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Give Your Sales Team the Jolt it Needs


Entrepreneur and motivational speaker Tony Robbins once said outstanding companies have a foundation made of outstanding people, and your sales team is no exception to this statement. Of course, you find the most exceptional sales force based on your hiring decisions, but do you ensure those workers continue to be impressive for years to come?

Employee burnout is a serious problem, and Psychology Today reported the effects of this issue are sometimes as severe as panic attacks and emergency room visits. With these risks in mind, you want to ensure your sales team is ready to tackle each day head on, understands its worth and feels energized to convert leads.

So how do you get keep your sales team going? For one, the answer is not more free coffee. If you want to supercharge your staff with more than a caffeine-fueled boost, you will need to model the energy you want to see from your workers, improve productivity and recognize your team members for their achievements.

Ramp up your energy
If Ponce de Leon was not pumped about locating the Fountain of Youth, do you think his crew would have followed him on a quest to find the impossible? The same could be asked about the many explorers who hunted for El Dorado, the city of gold. If you want to motivate your sales team, you must boldly and energetically take the helm.

“As a manager, you must model the energy you want your sales team to exude.”

How can you produce that energy for your team? Motivational speaker, author and salesman Zig Ziglar suggested having a positive attitude in all situations. At times, sales will be slow. In fact, Business News Daily said sale team members typically hear “no” more than “yes.” However, you cannot slow the momentum in these moments. If you have a grim attitude in dire situations, how is your sales team supposed to keep hope alive?

Imagine our explorers, who were faced with hostile environments, hunger and alien diseases. In many cases, they pressed on despite these obstacles, all the while assuring their crews that the prize was just within sight. You need to share that energy with your staff members so they will embody it while engaging current and future business.

Focus on the higher payoffs
What are your sales team members doing each day, and do they see the value in their work? If you said “no” to the second question, ask yourself whether your team is engaged in high-payoff activities.

Throughout the day, you may talk to your team members, and everyone appears busy. With their schedules and to-do lists full, you may not think twice about their productivity and motivation. However, how many of those items in their lists or schedules are necessary? Are they booked for meetings that they do not need to attend? Do they have nonessential duties?

If so, these employees can feel as though they are not hitting any milestones despite how busy they are. As motivational speaker and Success magazine publisher Darren Hardy said, a busy employee is not necessarily a productive one. This issue stems from managers as well as staff. Are you overloading your team with too many unnecessary tasks? If so, limit their duties to high-payoff activities, which first and foremost includes selling. This means calling leads, following up and becoming familiar with accounts are among your team’s top priorities.

Do not skimp on recognition
To further show your team’s value, set goals and reward your staff for reaching these milestones. Bloomberg Businessweek said employee engagement is key to motivation, and one way to keep workers engaged is to have clear objectives. How many new contacts should a team member obtain each week? How many lead conversions should occur each month?

“Goals give your sales team clear markers for achievement.”

Goals give your sales team clear markers for achievement, especially when those objectives are tied to high-payoff activities. But you cannot stop at setting goals. Sure, your team members will have a personal sense of value when they hit their quotas, but you must display that value from the company’s perspective.

In a keynote address delivered to SPEAK Inc., sales and sales management expert and motivational speaker Jack Daly emphasized the value of recognition, particularly for employees who go above and beyond to address client needs and ensure repeat business. Recognition must be a large part of your company’s culture and values.

These are outstanding individuals, so how do you make them feel exceptional? Not only should this encouragement come from the management level, but you should also foster an environment of peer-to-peer support, according to Forbes citing data from a 2012 Bersin & Associates study. Ensure your team members are uplifting each other.

Charging into the new year
With 2015 just beginning, this is the perfect opportunity to set a strong pace for your sales team. Get your staff in the right frame of mind to find their Fountains of Youth and El Dorados – to persevere through the slumps and keep their energy high.

AMMEXGive Your Sales Team the Jolt it Needs
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Uses for Disposable Gloves: Pet Hair Removal


Most pet owners love their furry friends but may not be as fond of the hair the animals leave behind on fabric. Luckily, disposable gloves are a fast way to remedy this problem.

Pet hair clings to furniture and clothing. If guests are visiting for a dinner party, a hair-covered couch does not present the most inviting space, especially if someone has allergies. Pet hair is also a hassle when it sticks to work clothing.

While many people use tape or lint rollers, disposable gloves are a better option. Simply slip on a glove, dampen it and run it over the fabric or upholstery. The hair will stick to the glove and can be rinsed off once the glove is covered. Repeat until the furniture or clothing is free of pet hair.

AMMEXUses for Disposable Gloves: Pet Hair Removal
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Changes: Gloves in the Automotive Industry


Changes: Gloves in the Automotive Industry


Not long ago, if you asked automotive technicians about wearing disposable gloves, they probably would’ve laughed.

These workers traditionally did not wear gloves, but that practice is going out the window.  In fact, technicians in this industry on average wear 13 pairs of gloves each day – and in some cases up to 16 pairs.

So what is driving the disposable glove revenue growth – about $1 billion in 2012 and projected to reach $1.3 billion in 2022 – in the automotive industry? The answer is protection from harsh chemicals, which is why 80 percent of the gloves used in this application are nitrile gloves. As more auto technicians wear gloves, this is a key growth area for distributors.


AMMEX-Disposable-Gloves-Market-Growth

 

AMMEXChanges: Gloves in the Automotive Industry
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Advantages of Powder Free Gloves


With production efficiencies and personal preferences, the trend toward powder free gloves is on the rise.

Why use powder free gloves?
Powder free gloves have a majority market share. This is because they are best for a number of applications.

Powder free gloves are preferred for the automotive industry, for example. When powdered gloves are donned, cornstarch powder particles are released into the air and introduce a potential source of contamination. For example, when automotive technicians are installing windshields, the powder weakens the seal of the glass, which may lead to leaks. In the case of painting, finishing, and sealing applications, these particles lead to fisheyes in the finish, making powder free gloves the better choice for these applications.

Another benefit of powder free gloves is they are less messy than powdered gloves. Powder leaves residue on both hands and clothing.

“Powder free gloves are great for painting.”

How are powder free gloves made?
Historically, manufacturers have used powder when creating powder free gloves. They powdered the glove formers to make the gloves easier to remove. After removing the gloves from the formers, manufacturers rinse the gloves, turn the gloves right side out and rinse the gloves again. As powder free gloves have become more popular, manufacturers have developed innovative ways to create the gloves without powdering the formers.

One way to remove residual powder from gloves is by chlorination. Chlorination is achieved using chlorine gas or a solution of hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid. This process reduces the surface tackiness of the natural rubber latex, making the gloves easier to don because they slide over hands without sticking to the skin. Furthermore, chlorination removes residual powder and lowers latex proteins in the glove. Thus, this process is more common for latex gloves.

Another way to make powder free gloves easier to don involves using a polymer coating. Manufacturers use various types of polymers, including silicones, acrylics and hydrogels. This coating is applied to the gloves’ interior while the gloves are on the former. Because the polymer has less surface friction than the glove material, it facilitates easier donning. Polymer coating is most common with nitrile gloves.

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Getting Ready for New Prop 65 Requirements


Starting Dec. 20, the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), which is part of the California Environmental Protection Agency, will roll out a new labeling requirement for products containing Diisononyl phthalate (DINP). Retailers and distributors in the state of California that sell items that contain this chemical must understand their obligations. This requirement is relevant for disposable glove distributors and retailers because some manufacturers use DINP in products made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC), including disposable vinyl gloves.

What the new labeling rule requires
The requirement for DINP labeling stems from the California Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, which is commonly known as Proposition 65. Per the law, distributors and retailers must have clear and understandable labeling that tells consumers DINP is present in a product.

This requirement does not say that products cannot contain the chemical. However, consumers must be informed if they are being exposed to unsafe levels of DINP. From Dec. 20 forward, any products that are not properly labeled will be considered in violation of the law. Not only can retailers and distributors face penalties from the government, but they can also be targets of lawsuits once it is revealed they sold improperly labeled products.

There is a specific standard label for DINP products:

  • WARNING: This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer.

Prop 65 is meant to inform California consumers of harmful chemicals in products they use.  According to the regulations, any products containing more than a trace amount of DINP must have a warning label.

In-depth look at Prop 65
According to the OEHHA, lawmakers created Prop 65 because voters wanted to be more aware of what chemicals are in the products they commonly use, particularly chemicals linked to cancer, reproductive issues and birth defects. Additionally, the legislation requires that California residents are informed about the presence of chemicals in products and chemicals that are released into the environment via manufacturing processes and products.

To keep consumers aware of harmful chemicals, the state publishes a list. Currently, this list exceeds 800 items. These chemicals are found in a number of places, from common household items such as vinyl flooring and garden hoses to solvents and byproducts such as unleaded gasoline fumes.

DINP, like all the other chemicals added to the list, met certain criteria for the Prop 65 program. One of these criteria is that an authoritative body, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, has found a correlation that a particular chemical causes any of the aforementioned issues. Also, chemicals are added if two independent groups of health care professionals or scientists corroborate these findings, the state or federal government requires labeling or they meet criteria of the California labor code.

What is DINP and its risks?
DINP is a phthalate plasticizer, meaning it softens plastics, and appears in many PVC products. Following oral exposure, the chemical is quickly absorbed into the body.

“DINP is a phthalate plasticizer that appears in many PVC products.”

How industries have responded
Labeling regulations under Prop 65 are meant to protect California residents, and chemicals on the list have stated risks, Bloomberg BNA reported. Many critics say the lack evidence with regard to DINP’s carcinogenic effects on humans is reason to reverse the decision to list the chemical. They said many products have contained DINP for years without any noticeable side effects in users.

While this may be true, retailers and distributors must ensure they are not liable for penalties and damages. Distributors could be liable if workers in these industries wear vinyl gloves sold in California that do not have the appropriate labels and contain more than a trace amount.

Despite what critics assert, distributors and retailers must adhere to proper labeling regulations under Prop 65 for products sold or shipped through the state of California. With vinyl gloves specifically, glove suppliers who are selling DINP compliant gloves are not required to label their PVC products with Prop 65 warnings.

AMMEXGetting Ready for New Prop 65 Requirements
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The Many Uses for Gloves in a Facility


There are various types of facilities, each of which having numerous applications that require disposable gloves. Within these facilities, numerous tasks – some core to the business and other supporting – are undertaken, and each of these instances requires a certain level of protection.

Here are some examples of activities at large facilities and how gloves are be beneficial to each:

  • Cleaning and janitorial staff: These workers need gloves for protection from the harsh chemicals in the cleaning supplies they use. Additionally, they must protect themselves from pathogens while sanitizing restrooms. Nitrile or vinyl gloves are used for these workers, as nitrile holds up to harsh chemicals, and vinyl is perfect for many glove changes between tasks.
  • Childcare: Some facilities have childcare services for employees on site. Daycare employees wear gloves as a protective barrier for themselves and the children. Gloves are donned for diaper changes, cleaning up messes, cleaning toys and feeding children.
  • First aid: This is another area where gloves serve as a protective barrier between wearers and the individuals. Nitrile exam gloves, for example, safeguard employees administering first aid against bloodborne pathogens and other diseases and are latex free.
  • Cafeteria: Three glove types are used in this area. Vinyl gloves appear in food production, poly gloves are used in food service and nitrile gloves are donned for heavier-duty, longer-period use. Many facilities prefer the use of antimicrobial vinyl gloves as an added layer of protection.
“When maintenance workers at industrial manufacturing facilities repair machines and fleet vehicles, they should protect their hands with disposable gloves.”
  • Line workers, assembler and fabricators: Workers on a factory floor handle harmful materials and substances. In battery manufacturing and processing plants, for example, lead is present during the manufacturing process. Employees who are exposed to these risks need protection for their hands while they work. Nitrile gloves, which are made of a highly chemically resistant synthetic rubber, are a suitable choice. Plus, they conform more closely to the hand as they are warmed by body heat, which allows for additional dexterity.
  • Maintenance: This area includes repairs to machinery used for manufacturing processes and to a facility’s fleet of transport vehicles. Maintenance workers come into contact with grease, gasoline and other solvents and need protection for their hands as they make repairs.
  • Packaging: Workers in this part of the manufacturing process are also subject to food safety regulations if foodstuffs and other consumables are being packaged. Furthermore, glove usage preserves the integrity of the packaging by preventing fingerprints.
  • Printing workers: Industrial printers use chemicals to produce printed labels and other items for their products. These chemicals include emulsions, inks, oxidizers and solvents. Disposable gloves protect workers’ hands from health risks, such as nervous system damage, that occur through skin absorption. Due to these chemical hazards, nitrile gloves are the solution in this case.
  • Security guards: These employees conduct inspections of other workers and need to wear gloves when doing so. Gloves protect security guards against contracting illnesses from persons they come in physical contact with.
AMMEXThe Many Uses for Gloves in a Facility
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Unexpected Uses for Disposable Gloves: Fishing


Who would have thought that disposable gloves could be an excellent holiday gift! According to The Vancouver Columbian, nitrile gloves are a perfect holiday gift for individuals who enjoy outdoor activities such as fishing.

Many anglers like to wear gloves when they are on the water, and the holiday season is the perfect time to promote nitrile gloves. In Vancouver’s lower Columbia area, for example, fishers typically use the gloves during the spring chinook salmon season, according to the source.

One key selling point for glove usage while fishing is gloves are useful when releasing fish, Field & Stream reported. Anglers need to grasp the fish without harming it’s vital organs by holding too tightly. A textured nitrile glove provides the necessary grip.

Additionally, the Vancouver Columbian noted these gloves are useful for sardine wrapping a lure. Because there is a barrier between wearers and the sardines, the scent of the wearers’ hands will not get on the bait. Plus, because these gloves offer top-notch dexterity, they are suitable for the minute tasks that come with fishing, such as stringing a lure or cleaning fish.

With these advantages in mind, it is a great idea to purchase nitrile gloves along with their other fishing-related gifts. Not to mention, they are great to have on have on hand for boat motor repairs and cleanup.

AMMEXUnexpected Uses for Disposable Gloves: Fishing
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All About Powdered Gloves


If disposable glove wearers need a product that is easier to slip on their hands, powdered products are the solution. There are powdered latex, nitrile and vinyl gloves available.

The history of powdered gloves
According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, researchers began searching for a way to facilitate easier glove donning in surgical applications in the late 1800s. Early methods included wetting the glove material and using various powders, such as talcum powder and a powder made from Lycopodium spores, which are ground pines or club moss. However, both of these powders led to postoperative complications.

Food-grade cornstarch began appearing in gloves by 1947, and by the 1970s, it grabbed the largest market share. Compared to the previous two powders, cornstarch has necessary absorptive properties and does not lead to irritation. Although this powder is currently the most commonly used, gloves are also powdered with calcium or lactose, according to Infection Control Today.

These dusting powders are applied to the gloves near the end of the manufacturing process. After the glove forms are dipped in the glove materials and excess proteins and other residues are removed through the leaching process, the gloves are powdered before they are stripped from their forms. The FDA noted the cornstarch powder mixture is 2 percent magnesium oxide. This keeps the powder from turning into a paste or otherwise thickening.

What are the benefits of powdered gloves?
In the past, natural rubber latex was the main material used for disposable gloves. Latex is a flexible material that closely conforms to the hand, a feature that makes donning difficult for some wearers. This point became more pronounced when glove usage increased as a result of growing awareness of HIV in the 1980s.

To provide more ease in donning gloves, the food-grade cornstarch powder absorbs moisture on hands. This is a key benefit for individuals whose palms are prone to sweating. Additionally, the powder absorbs excess moisture that is present after wearers wash their hands, a step that should be undertaken before gloves are donned.

Powdered gloves are not suitable for all applications, as the cornstarch powder interferes with certain biological and chemical processes, such as chemical sealing and wound closure, respectively. Additionally, the powder damages paints, varnishes and lacquers, and if even a speck of powder lands on a freshly painted surface, it may cause a fish eye. However, outside of these applications, powdered gloves are found in many industries.

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Know Your Glove Materials: Part IV Poly


Polyethylene is the most affordable glove material and is used in the food service industry. Food service workers need a glove with enough durability for short-duration tasks, and poly gloves are the right choice.

What is polyethylene?
Like polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene was first created by accident. German chemist Hans von Pechmann made the first polyethylene in 1898. In 1933, Reginald Gibson and Eric Fawcett, two scientists at Imperial Chemical Industries, also accidentally created polyethylene, and their employer would be the driving force behind the material’s innovation in early years.

Polyethylene is a polymer that is synthesized from ethylene and a thermoplastic that is formed into various shapes as it cools from a liquid state to a solid state.

There are different forms of polyethylene, with one being high-density polyethylene (HDPE), which is the harder form of the plastic. Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is thinner, less opaque than HDPE and used to make plastic grocery bags, dispensing bottles and disposable gloves. It is a flexible and tough material though not as durable as other glove materials.

LDPE is a non-leaching plastic in its natural state. This means it will not release unwanted chemicals into food, which is why poly gloves are suitable for the food service industry. Additionally, LDPE is used for creating protective film for food packaging.

Two polyethylene sheets are seamed and sealed with heat to create disposable gloves. Because poly gloves are not dipped like latex, nitrile and vinyl gloves, they are not impervious to liquids. Vinyl gloves are a suitable alternative for food services tasks where liquids are present.

“Poly gloves are made from low-density polyethylene.”

What are the benefits of poly gloves?
The food service industry requires workers to change their gloves often. In a sandwich deli, for instance, an employee would make one customer’s order. Afterward, he or she should follow proper handwashing guidelines and don a new pair of gloves for the next customer. Given the frequency of these changes, the industry requires a cost-effective glove material, which is why poly gloves are the preferred choice.

Poly gloves are also powder and latex free. Both traits are beneficial for preventing allergic reactions among workers and customers. Given that the gloves directly touch food that is ingested, the latex and corn proteins that cause the reaction could easily enter a customer’s body, possibly leading to a more severe reaction. Poly gloves are a safe alternative.

AMMEXKnow Your Glove Materials: Part IV Poly
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