The Right Glove for the Job


Disposable gloves are used for a multitude of purposes, from food preparation to medical to automotive. However, it’s important to know which type of gloves are best suited for your intended purpose. Here’s a look at the main types of gloves and their uses:

Latex
Latex gloves offer the best fit and dexterity, which is why  these gloves are more comfortable for longer wear. Outside of the medical and dental fields, latex gloves are commonly used for janitorial work, beauty services, child care, safe chemical handling, plumbing and painting.

Nitrile
Currently, 80 percent of the disposable gloves in the automotive field are nitrile because they offer superior puncture resistance and barrier protection against a variety of harsh chemicals. Nitrile gloves are also becoming more popular in the medical and dental fields because of the growing prevalence of latex sensitivities. Nitrile gloves conform to the hands during wear for comfortable fit, and they are highly resistant to a variety of chemicals. Industrial and medical grade nitrile gloves come in a range of different colors, which may be functional as well as eye-catching. For example, orange industrial-grade nitrile gloves help workers be more aware of their hands when working in dark environments.

Vinyl
As more food service and processing workers use gloves during preparation, vinyl glove usage is taking off. Vinyl gloves contain no latex, have a smooth surface and have a looser fit than nitrile or latex gloves although they still conform to the hands. These gloves are also used in other industries, including medical and janitorial-sanitation.

Poly
Poly gloves are perfect for food preparation and handling because of their loose fit, which makes it easier for employees to remove the gloves for more frequent glove changes. Stretch poly gloves have a more enhanced grip and are easier to don.

 

The-Right-Glove-AMMEX

 

AMMEXThe Right Glove for the Job
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Not without Gloves: Wood stains


Wood stains come in a variety of compositions and consistencies. Some are semi-transparent, and others are intended to create a thick coating over the wood. Because of the variety of products on the market, specific stains may have multiple hazardous chemicals in them. Here are some chemicals commonly found in wood stains and effective disposable gloves for each:

Ethylene glycol
Although many wood stains are water-based, they still contain a small percentage of a solvent, such as ethylene glycol. This chemical is poorly absorbed through the skin, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control still recommends chemical-resistant gloves for handling ethylene glycol. For ethylene glycol in its liquid form, vinyl, nitrile and latex gloves all provide protection. In the solvent’s ether form, latex and nitrile gloves may be used for a limited time. On-site testing should always be conducted to determine the safe handling time for a particular solution.

Sodium hydroxide
Sodium hydroxide is a corrosive with the potential to cause burns on any tissue it comes into contact with. Chemical burns may even lead to deep tissue damage, so this chemical should always be handled with care. Solutions of sodium hydroxide with up to a 50 percent concentration may be safely handled with latex, nitrile or vinyl gloves.

Mineral spirits are hydrocarbons commonly found in wood stains, paints and paint thinners. Direct contact with mineral spirits causes skin burns, irritation and even necrosis. Nitrile gloves offer protection for safe handling of mineral spirit concentrations of up to 100 percent.

Ethyl alcohol
Ethyl alcohol is most commonly found in alcoholic beverages, and it is also used as a solvent and to manufacture other chemicals. Ethyl alcohol is flammable, and high concentrations may irritate the skin or cause redness or dryness. For wood stains containing ethyl alcohol, latex and nitrile gloves are well suited for application. Vinyl gloves may be used for a limited time.

Latex
Some film finishes are latex-based for a more solid finish and better color retention than other stains but adds risks for people with latex sensitivities. Nitrile gloves are suitable for people with latex sensitivities or allergies, and these gloves provide superior chemical resistance for many different compounds.

1,4-Dioxane
1,4-dioxane is a chemical found in wood stains and a suspected carcinogen that may also cause skin irritation. Latex and vinyl gloves may be used for a limited time for protection from 1,4-dioxane.

 

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Choose Quality Work Gloves

Depending on the situations workers regularly encounter, they may need work gloves that are suitable for repeat use. Rather than wearing disposable gloves, dipped, dishwashing or leather gloves for home and industrial applications may be best for messy or tough situations. Some jobs need more strength and protection than disposal gloves offer, which is why AMMEX has a full line of heavy duty work gloves to meet your needs. You may need a stronger grip, warmth or better puncture protection. Here is the complete list of work gloves and their uses:

Latex dipped work gloves
Latex dipped work gloves have a string polyester cotton interior and are partially dipped in texturized latex for better grip. These gloves are used for industrial and home situations when a strong grip is necessary. However, these gloves may not be suitable for people with latex sensitivities.

Nitrile dipped work gloves
These gloves are stretch nylon and partially dipped in nitrile on the outside. These may be a better choice for people who should not come into contact with latex. Nitrile dipped gloves are seamless and have a texture that makes gripping easier.

Dishwashing gloves
Beyond what their name implies, dishwashing gloves are well suited for a variety of uses in the home, industrial facilities and commercial kitchens. They also may be used for cleaning purposes because of the longer 12 inch cuff. They are 17 millimeters thick to protect the wearer’s hands and are flock lined for comfort and textured across the palms.

Knit work gloves
Brown or white jersey knit gloves are a cotton and polyester blend and come in two sizes. It is important to keep your hands warm when working outside during the winter, and these gloves are fleece-lined, making them suitable for working in cold temperatures. The brown color may be better for working in dirty environments.

Leather work gloves
AMMEX offers multiple types of leather gloves for a variety of uses. Unlined leather driver gloves are cooler for longer wear. They are made out of grain leather and have a winged thumb. Unlined leather driving gloves are a great choice for machine operators to keep their hands comfortable while using equipment. Split cowhide gloves with a rubberized cuff are heavy duty for protection, and fleece lined in the palm to keep the hands warm. The rubberized gauntlet cuff helps the glove stay on the hand. These gloves are great for garden work, especially when handling tools or thorny plants. Alternatively, AMMEX offers split cowhide gloves with a starched cuff that may be more suitable for people with latex sensitivities.

String knit work gloves
These gloves are made from cotton and polyester well-suited for gardening and other yard work applications. They also come in a variety with double PVC dots for better grip.

Work glove liners
Sold in both cotton and nylon varieties, workers are able to use these glove liners inside other gloves or on their own. Nylon glove liners are lint free, making them well-suited for inspecting products on the line. Cotton glove liners make heavy duty work gloves more comfortable for longer wear.

Contact AMMEX to learn more about work gloves.

AMMEXChoose Quality Work Gloves
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Gear up for Safety Month with AMMEX!


June is National Safety Month and AMMEX has you covered to get a grip on safety. Protect those hard working hands with our suite of heavy duty and premium disposable gloves. Our Gloveworks Orange Nitrile Gloves provide superior durability with a unique, high visibility orange color. This raised diamond texture provides for an excellent grip in wet or dry conditions. At the end of the day it is all about the better performance, better protection, and better safety.

Next up, our GloveWorks HD Latex Gloves are perfect for your toughest jobs. Twice as thick as standard latex gloves, they still provide the dexterity and sensitivity that you expect. With enhanced puncture resistance, each glove has a longer duration of use so you don’t have to switch gloves as often. Not to mention, you can’t deny the comfortable fit and feel of a latex glove.

Another latex pick for Safety Month are the GlovePlus HD Blue Latex Exam Gloves. These heavy duty industrial grade gloves are almost four times thicker than standard gloves with an extended cuff for added protection. They are great for high risk and chemical applications and feature enhanced comfort and dexterity. Not only that, they are more elastic than nitrile and have better puncture and tear resistance due to their added thickness.

Steer clear of latex allergies with the Gloveworks HD Nitrile Exam Gloves. These HD gloves are highly resistant to most common chemicals and a number of specialty chemicals. Their chemical resistance is supported by the thickness, which is twice as much as standard gloves, and an extended cuff for extra protection. This exam grade glove is suitable for both industrial and medical purposes.

Our final glove pick for the Month of June is the glove that put AMMEX on the map, the GlovePlus Black Nitrile. Fifty percent thicker than standard nitrile gloves, this premium pick has a sleek professional look that conceals dirt, grease, and grime. GlovePlus Black Nitrile Gloves feature excellent protection against common chemicals, like carburetor cleaner, and many other specialty chemicals – such as iodine and butane – that you may encounter on the job. Great in automotive, these gloves hold up to brake fluid and stay true to form even after being dipped in gasoline.

Now is the time to gear up and choose the right gloves for any job. AMMEX is ready with high quality social media content and a full breadth of information on our blog. Looking for some fun facts, tips, or just want to impress others by being a glove expert!? Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Just search @youneedgloves or AMMEX Corporation.

If you are interested in testing our products and receiving some free samples, contact your AMMEX distributor or contact us on our website. If you would like to become a distributor, contact us for more information.

You may not think about gloves until you need them. So it’s a good thing we have the right ones…and the left ones!

AMMEXGear up for Safety Month with AMMEX!
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Not Without Gloves: Pesticides


Pesticides should always be handled with the proper barrier protection. Different formulations target various organisms, such as insects, rodents, algae, weeds and fungi. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates the use of all pesticides and requires chemicals that have been registered for many years to be reassessed to ensure they meet current standards.

Pesticides typically come in organic or inorganic solutions with an active ingredient. Although some pesticide formulas are less toxic than others, they are still hazardous to human health in high levels, and anyone handling these products must protect themselves. Here are some of the hazardous chemicals commonly found in pesticides and effective gloves for handling each:

Naphthalene
Naphthalene is made from crude oil, coal tar or created when other chemicals burn. It was the first registered pesticide in the U.S. in 1948. Because this chemical is found in mothballs, it has been shown to cause anemia in infants when the clothing was not washed prior to wear, according to the National Pesticide Information Center at Oregon State University. It has been linked to anemia in adults as well. Although naphthalene breaks down in the environment over time, workers should wear gloves when handling pesticides that contain this chemical.

Latex, nitrile and vinyl gloves are all resistant to naphthalene. Because these types of gloves all provide protection from this chemical, it is easier for companies to accommodate people with latex sensitivities.

Paradichlorobenzene
Another common insecticide, paradichlorobenzene causes a burning sensation on the skin after prolonged contact. Nitrile gloves are recommended protection from skin exposure to this toxin.

Capsaicin
Even naturally occurring chemicals can cause harm. Capsaicin, for example, is a naturally occurring chemical that gives chili peppers their heat. It is used to deter mites, insects and animals. While it is safe for humans to eat, it may irritate the skin or eyes upon contact, especially when highly concentrated. The effects are temporary and it is considered a safer pesticide because it is a naturally occurring substance, but skin contact may cause pain. High concentrations of capsaicin may burn through latex gloves in a short time. Nitrile gloves provide greater protection from this harsh substance.

For any pesticide, it is important to know the solution’s chemical composition and then test disposal work gloves for resistance to identify safe exposure levels. Contact your AMMEX representative or contact us on our website to learn more about the right barrier protection and add gloves to your line up.

AMMEXNot Without Gloves: Pesticides
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Not without Gloves: Salon Chemicals

Helping clients look their best may come at a price for salon workers because they are often exposed to hazardous chemicals. Hair and nail salon workers handle potentially toxic chemicals on a daily basis, and they need to know how to protect themselves. Employees must be aware of the risks and don the right personal protective equipment based on the chemicals they handle. Here are some common salon chemicals and barrier protection for each:

Acetone
A common ingredient in both nail polish remover and hairspray, acetone may cause skin irritation. In some cases, there may not be sufficient alternatives to allow salon workers to completely avoid exposure to this chemical. However, latex gloves offer superior barrier protection so employees minimize skin exposure. Vinyl is not resistant to acetone, so latex is the best choice for handling acetone. However, depending on the length of exposure to chemicals, nitrile may be a better choice to avoid exposure to latex.

Formaldehyde
Formaldehyde, which is often found in nail polish and nail hardeners, is one of the riskiest chemicals for salon workers to handle because it may cause cancer after long-term exposure. From short-term exposure, formaldehyde causes skin irritation and dermatitis. Even low concentrations of formaldehyde may lead to negative side effects. The U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) recommended respirators for handling formaldehyde. Many salons are well-ventilated, but N95-rated masks filter out dust and germs. Gloves should also be used to protect the skin. Latex, vinyl and nitrile gloves offer protection from this chemical for concentrations up to 99 percent.

Trichloroethylene
Often used in hair extension glue and lace wig glue, trichloroethylene may cause eye and skin irritation, as well as nausea and disorientation. Long-term exposure may lead to dermatitis and liver and kidney damage. Nitrile gloves provide protection against this chemical. In addition, vinyl gloves may be used for a limited time to guard against trichloroethylene exposure.

Dibutyl phthalate
Dibutyl phthalate is found in nail polish and may cause skin irritation. Within the selection of glove materials, nitrile gloves protect workers from dibutyl phthalate whereas latex gloves may be used for a limited time to protect from this chemical.

Toulene
Used in many different industries and common in a number of beauty products, including nail polish, nail glue, hair dye and hairpiece bonding, toulene is one of the most toxic chemicals in salons. It has been linked to skin rashes, nausea, eye irritation and headaches. If workers are exposed to this chemical for an extended length of time, it may lead to birth defects or the loss of a pregnancy. Because this chemical is so toxic, vinyl gloves may be used, but for only a limited time.

Because concentrations may vary, it is important to check the safety data sheet issued by the manufacturer and conduct in-house testing to determine the safe exposure time. Gloves should always be replaced if they are torn or compromised in any way. Although nitrile gloves offer barrier protection against many common salon chemicals, it is crucial to understand the recommendations for each solution. Concentrations may vary by manufacturer, and salons need to ensure they select the right gloves for the application. In addition to chemicals, salon workers need gloves to protect them from customers’ nails, blood or skin.

To learn more about what glove is best for the chemicals you may be using contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor. If you are already a distributor, speak with your salesperson to discover more about what AMMEX can offer for you.

AMMEXNot without Gloves: Salon Chemicals
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What Your Shelves Say about Your Disposable Gloves


Did you know salespeople are not the only ones who talk to consumers about the benefits of buying disposable gloves? If not, you forget important product advocates: your displays.

Gloves will not sell themselves. Strategic displays allow you to uncover the hidden potential of the glove line to sell more products and increase your sales. The good news is AMMEX Corporation’s products and Sales Acceleration Solution® (SAS) give you the tools you need to make your shelves talk the disposable gloves talk and entice consumers to buy your products.

What you get with AMMEX products
AMMEX packaging starts a visual conversation with consumers. Not only do the glove images speak in a language every customer understands, but they also present three views:

AMMEX-What-does-your-shelves-say

  • Option A is to show the front face of the packaging to customers, which provides the largest surface area for viewing.
  • Option B is to stack the boxes with the side face pointing at the aisle, creating a display with a medium length and a short height.
  • The final view, option C, is to position the gloves with the more vertical face directed at customers, providing a shorter length but more height.

“Strategic displays allow you to increase your sales.”

How to display your glove inventory
The aforementioned configurations for displaying your gloves rely on your goals for the products and the shelf dimensions.

Here are some tips for arranging your gloves on shelving units:

  • To maximize space, use option B, as indicated on the right in the image below. Within a standard 12-foot shelving unit, this strategy allows for gloves to occupy four rows. As a result, you display more sizes across the space. However, this option provides only one view of the product. Another drawback of option B is this route presents challenges for placing barcode index numbers (BINs) on the sides of the shelves to indicate the products present. For instance, if you place four glove sizes on one shelf because you have the space, you must fit those four BINs in the same space.
  • To display both the front and one side panel of the packaging, use a combination of options A and C, as shown on the left side of the image. The trade-off here is space is sacrificed for greater visibility, but managing the BIN channel will be easier.
  • Keep in mind products at eye level attract the most customers. Consequently, it is best to place your most profitable glove products in this position. Also, consider the sizes that are more likely to sell to your customers. It is best practice to always display large and extra large gloves, and judge how many small and medium products to display based on demand.

AMMEX-Showcase-the-product

These are various options for displaying AMMEX products on your shelves.

Keeping the conversation going with shelf talkers
Now that customers have seen the product, how do you close the sale – especially when a salesperson cannot always be present? This is where your shelf talkers become integral.

Shelf talkers are materials that you display with the products to educate customers about their purchasing decision. These include the laminated chemical resistance and glove sizing chart that comes with your SAS kit. Because these items provide information on topics such as the difference between poly and vinyl gloves, you supply the details necessary to successfully convert a sale without having a glove expert in the area at all times.

Also, consider zip tying glove samples from your SAS kit to the shelf or leaving a master bag near the products. This gives customers an interactive shopping experience where they truly feel the difference between the many glove types. Plus, this tactic helps reduce shrinkage by eliminating the need for customers to open boxes to feel the glove materials.

Maximizing your sales
None of the aforementioned tips work if you do not use them effectively. When choosing between options A, B and C, the key to boosting sales is to select a glove assortment and product layout that caters to your customers. For instance, if your shelf space accommodates only a 1-foot configuration (the top row in the image), do not overload that space with small latex gloves if your business mostly services auto technicians who need the chemical protection of nitrile gloves and have larger hands.

Another consideration is where you put the gloves display in the store. To keep customers from having an ah-ha moment at home about a product they should have purchased at your store, put different glove types next to accompanying items in your store. In hardware and paint stores, for example, 90 percent of the products pair well with nitrile gloves. By placing these gloves with related products, you ensure customers get everything they need in one trip. Clip strips and glove project packs (pictured on the left in the above image) are perfect for this task.

Any vendor can sell you gloves. AMMEX is here to help you sell more. Contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor.

AMMEXWhat Your Shelves Say about Your Disposable Gloves
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All about Allergies: Part 2 Synthetics


Natural rubber latex disposable gloves typically get most of the attention when it comes to allergies, but allergic reactions are also possible with synthetic glove materials like nitrile butadiene rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC or vinyl). While allergies to these materials themselves are uncommon, the chemicals used in the production processes are common causes.

During the production of nitrile and vinyl gloves, manufacturers use various substances to turn the base ingredients into the final glove materials. These chemicals are in both the process to form the actual PVC and nitrile and to turn these materials into gloves.

To create vinyl, for example, petroleum is used in the manufacturing process. Petroleum is used to create naphtha, which is combined with other chemicals to form ethylene. The ethylene is combined with chlorine, and through two more transformations, this combination becomes polyvinyl chloride.

Allergy tiggers
With latex gloves, the allergic reactions usually stem from the proteins in the latex. With synthetics, the issue lies with the petroleum. While rare, petroleum allergies do occur in some individuals.

As a result of contact with the glove materials, individuals with petroleum allergies experience contact dermatitis, which may lead to skin irritation, hives, redness and blistering in more extreme cases. Respiratory effects, such as throat itching, coughing and wheezing, appear with allergic reactions to petroleum gas but not commonly with petroleum-based gloves.

“If certain individuals wear a glove that is too-tight, the skin will not be able to breathe inside the glove which may cause an irritation.”

Acknowledging indirect causes of irritation
Although petroleum allergies are rare, some nitrile and vinyl glove wearers will experience contact dermatitis. However, this reaction does not always occur because of the glove materials.

One common issue is an irritative substance on the hands. Certain substances, such as residual hand soap or a scented lotion, will not cause too much of a problem on an exposed hand, but the associated reaction to it will be more pronounced in some individuals when they have a glove pressing the substance to their skin.

This issue is more evident when a glove is too small. Overall, too-tight gloves create irritation and discomfort as the skin is unable to breathe inside the glove.

Key points about glove material allergies
Whether it is latex, nitrile or vinyl, glove users must ensure they have the right gloves for the job. This applies to selecting the right material for the application as well as the appropriate size.

Additionally, as individuals and employers attempt to accommodate allergies, they must also consider how the alternative glove materials will fare in their work environments.  For a wide variety of glove options ranging in material, thickness, and sizing contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to learn more.

AMMEXAll about Allergies: Part 2 Synthetics
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All about Allergies: Part 1 Latex


Latex allergies have serious consequences for health care and industrial workers as well as patients. Individuals experience a range of reactions from coming into contact with latex, including contact dermatitis and anaphylaxis, which is life-threatening. These reactions stem from the natural rubber latex proteins. Although latex gloves provide the best fit and feel, they are not the right choice for those with latex sensitivities. It’s crucial for people who come into contact with latex to understand the symptoms of a reaction.

What are latex allergies?
An immediate reaction after contact with latex is an indication of an allergy. This type of response to latex triggers the immune system, causing sneezing, a runny nose, coughing or wheezing and an itchy throat or eyes. Repeated exposure may cause people with only minor reactions to progress to anaphylaxis over time.

This reaction is triggered by latex proteins, which come from natural rubber. Many latex gloves are powdered, and the food-grade cornstarch powder transfers the proteins to the skin. The powder also spreads proteins to the eyes and throat.

“Health care workers are at an increased risk for latex sensitivity as latex is the most common glove used in that industry.”

Employees who work with latex products frequently may develop allergic reactions. This is especially common in the health care sector and rubber factories. People who have had 10 or more surgeries, food allergies or a family history of allergies are at a heightened risk.

While some people are born with latex allergies, many individuals have sensitivities that become more severe with repeated exposure. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, 50 percent of people with latex allergy have a history of another type of allergy.

What are the symptoms of a reaction?
One of the most common reactions to latex is contact dermatitis, which is irritation or dryness of the skin. Delayed contact dermatitis often appears 12 to 36 hours after using a latex product, and the symptoms include red, scaly or itchy skin. Anyone who uses latex gloves may experience this reaction, but it does not mean they are allergic. Because there is a wide range of reactions to latex and they may get more severe over time, it’s important to check with a doctor or allergist to determine the true cause of a reaction.

Anaphylaxis is life-threatening because the reaction isn’t limited to one part of the body. People may experience difficulty breathing, red rashes, itchiness, swollen throat, chest tightness and trouble swallowing. This type of reaction may even cause someone to lose consciousness. Anaphylaxis typically occurs between 5-30 minutes of coming into contact with an allergen. While only 1 percent of the global population experiences anaphylaxis, latex is a common cause.

When reactions aren’t latex allergies
Contact dermatitis has multiple causes and not all are related to allergies. For example, medical professionals wash their hands frequently, leading to dryness. In addition, gloves trap soap, moisture or lotion against the skin, which sometimes causes irritation, especially when people don’t have the right glove size. Moreover, contact dermatitis sometimes happens because of incomplete hand drying or the friction of the glove powder rubbing against the skin.

Delayed hypersensitivity is often caused by the chemicals used to manufacture the gloves rather than the latex proteins. Antioxidants, emulsifiers, stabilizers and stiffeners cause severe contact dermatitis within two days after exposure for some people, and the reaction spreads to other areas such as the face in some cases. People with immediate hypersensitivity should avoid all exposure to latex in hopes of preventing a latex allergy.

Chronic contact dermatitis and delayed hypersensitivity are usually limited to the area of contact, but individuals with recurring reactions should see a doctor, dermatologist or allergist to confirm. Chronic contact dermatitis may be indicative of a different allergy.

The global perspective
As countries develop, glove usage is becoming more common in health systems around the world. The primary type of glove is latex, and allergies are occurring more frequently because of repeated exposure. The U.S. and other developed nations have started to use alternatives to latex, and other countries may need to follow suit.

Viable latex alternatives
AMMEX Corporation offers a full line of latex and synthetic exam-grade gloves to suit whatever needs you have. AMMEX Nitrile Exam Gloves are an excellent alternative to latex and have many benefits, such as greater tear resistance. Additionally, AMMEX Vinyl Exam Gloves are a cost-effective alternative to latex.

AMMEXAll about Allergies: Part 1 Latex
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Barrier Protection Needs in the Beauty Industry


Whether customers seek no-chip manicures or a relaxing foot massage, nail and beauty technicians need barrier protection to guard themselves against harsh chemicals and pathogens. This presents a large sales opportunity for distributors of disposable gloves and masks.

Not only are salon owners looking out for the safety of their employees, but they are also liable to regulations from the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA). These best practices and rules are in place for a good reason.

The chemicals used by technicians include acetone, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone and isopropyl acetate. Prolonged exposure to these substances via skin contact or breathing in the vapors leads to symptoms such as:

  • Dizziness
  • Skin, eye, mouth and nose irritation
  • Burns
  • Harm to fetuses of pregnant technicians
  • Difficulties concentrating
  • Coughing fits and asthma attacks
  • Kidney and liver damage

With regard to biological risks, employees need protection against bloodborne pathogens.

To address these risks, salon owners should purchase a few types of barrier protection:

Disposable gloves
Several glove materials are fitting for the safety risks present in salons. Latex gloves, such as the LX3 and Gloveworks Industrial Latex, are suitable for guarding against chemicals and pathogens.

However, because of the growing prevalence of latex allergies, the industry is trending toward non-latex gloves, such as nitrile and vinyl. Though nitrile gloves, such as the X3, X3D, and AMMEX Indigo Nitrile Exam Gloves, are not recommended for use with acetone, technicians are able to use these gloves because they have limited exposure to the chemical. Stretch synthetic vinyl gloves are also suitable. With these alternatives, neither workers or customers are exposed to latex.

“Gloves protect nail technicians from pathogens and harsh chemicals.”

Masks
Not all masks provide equal results in nail and beauty salons. Many salons use ear loop face masks (ELFMs), which also protect customers from what workers exhale.

N95-rated masks are filtering face pieces. These products, such as the N95 face mask, are useful for nail buffing and applying acrylic powders because they filter out germs and dusts. To fully realize this protection, workers must have properly fitted masks. They will find proper fitting information on the mask packaging.

Reaching the wide open market
With the aforementioned information in mind, it’s not hard to see why the more than 375,000 nail technicians in the U.S. need barrier protection. Distributors who would like to learn more about products that are suitable for their salon clients should speak with their AMMEX sales representative or contact us on our website for more information.

AMMEXBarrier Protection Needs in the Beauty Industry
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