Why Safety Matters for All Industries


June is National Safety Month and workplace safety is no accident.  In fact, occupational accidents and injuries affect every industry and can majorly impact an employer’s bottom line.  Businesses spend $170 billion a year on costs associated with occupational injuries and Illness. However, workplace accidents can be substantially reduced with a solid safety program incorporating personal protective equipment (PPE). This June, we encourage you to learn more about why safety matters for all industries.  Each week during National Safety Month, AMMEX will share valuable industry-specific topics, tips, and trends that you can reshare or send directly so you are a Safety Expert for your clients #‎SafetyMatters.

Safety Matters for All Industries

    • Week 1:  Safety Month Launch
    • Week 2:  JanSan Industry
    • Week 3:  Automotive Industry
    • Week 4:  Food Service Industry
    • Week 5:  Medical and Dental Industry

Why Safety Matters for All Industries

Workplace safety affects all industries – whether it’s food safety in the food service industry, chemical safety in janitorial and sanitation, or protection against biological agents in the medical and dental industry – whatever the case workplace safety matters to every industry.  In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that workplace injuries reached 3.0 million in 2014 and occurred across all occupations.  Workplace injuries can significantly impact an employer’s bottom line.

“Creating a safe workplace is becoming increasingly important to business success.”

Employers that invest in workplace safety can expect to reduce fatalities, injuries, and illnesses. This will result in cost savings in a variety of areas, such as lowering workers’ compensation costs and medical expenses, avoiding OSHA penalties, and reducing costs to train replacement employees and conduct accident investigations. In addition, employers often find that changes made to improve workplace safety and health can result in significant improvements to their organization’s productivity and financial performance.

“Because much work is done with the hands, gloves are essential for workplace safety programs.”

Fatalities and injuries can be substantially reduced with the use of personal protective equipment (PPE).  Any form of PPE that acts as a barrier between the skin and the agent of exposure can be considered skin protection. Gloves are an essential tool in protecting workers. Some examples of gloves commonly used as PPE include leather work gloves and disposable gloves such as nitrile, latex, vinyl or poly.  Many different gloves are used for protection, generally against biological agents, chemical agents, and mechanical trauma.  Other than gloves, protection worn for the purpose of protecting the skin is considered personal protection equipment such as face masks, poly sleeves, aprons, and hair nets.

National Safety Month is a great time for employers to evaluate workplace safety programs and safety equipment. The benefits of a workplace safety program can directly affect the company’s bottom line, reducing costs and improving productivity.  AMMEX disposable gloves are sold by AMMEX distributors and trusted by the most prominent end users across a variety of industries.  Contact us today to become a distributor and supply your customers with superior quality disposable gloves and barrier protection products.

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Disruptive Technology: Be Confident with AMMEX


A disruptive technology is one that displaces an established technology and shakes up the industry or a ground-breaking product that creates a completely new industry.  The explosion in popularity of mobile devices, social media, cloud solutions, big data and the Internet of Things (IoT) are forcing organizations to change the way they do business. Has your Glove Vendor taken the right steps to navigate and leverage disruptive technologies? Disruptive Technology: Be Confident with AMMEX

How have the following disruptive technologies changed your everyday way of life?

  • The personal computer (PC) displaced the typewriter and forever changed the way we work and communicate.
  • Email transformed the way we communicate, largely displacing letter-writing and disrupting the postal and greeting card industries.
  • Smartphones largely replaced cell phones and PDAs and, because of the available apps, also disrupted: pocket cameras, MP3 players, calculators and GPS devices, among many other possibilities.
  • For some mobile users, smartphones often replace laptops. Others prefer a tablet.
  • Cloud computing has been a hugely disruptive technology in the business world, displacing many resources that would conventionally have been located in-house or provided as a traditionally hosted service.
  • Social networking has had a major impact on the way we communicate and — especially for personal use — disrupting telephone, email, instant messaging and event planning.

One of the most consistent patterns in business is the failure of leading companies to stay at the top of their industries when technologies or markets change.  Companies must formulate a strategic plan that includes core competencies and future business objectives, and is in step with the customer and the changing global marketplace.

B2B AMMEX Gloves

What has your glove vendor done for you?

When you place an order with your disposable glove vendor, do you get everything in one shipment? During a busy season, waiting on products on backorder is not good for business, especially if you do not want to lose customers to the competition.

Partnering with AMMEX Corporation, getting the supply you need at the right time is not something you will worry about. We use top notch supply chain management technology and strategies to ensure your complete order arrives on time.  Here at AMMEX we leverage disruptive technology and have plans in place for the changing global marketplace and disruptive technology.

AMMEX Distributors can rest assured, our fill rate is 99.6% and our order accuracy rate is 99.8%.

To stay competitive in the fast changing global marketplace, companies need to have an innovative, growth-focused mentality and leverage disruptive technology.  For AMMEX, that means integrating new technology to maintain a global presence and more effectively reach customers. We have remained technology competitive by integrating systems such as QR codes, Doc-link, Vidyo, and our new state-of-the-art Website.

Technology always evolves. The most successful companies understand how to take advantage of new advancements and use them to improve business. When it comes to disruptive technology you can be confident with AMMEX.  We are proud to remain innovative in a fast-changing global business environment and will continue to look for the next best technology that makes internal processes more efficient and improves relationships with customers.

The organizations that can turn disruption into a business opportunity and quickly execute a strategy will be in better position to succeed. Those that can’t may spend a lot of time trying to catch-up, and some may never do so.

Anyone can sell you gloves, AMMEX helps you sell more gloves. AMMEX distributors grow their gloves sales an average of 31% annually. AMMEX carries the widest variety of disposable glove products to meet your customer needs.  Contact us today to become a distributor and to learn how AMMEX can grow your glove sales.

AMMEXDisruptive Technology: Be Confident with AMMEX
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The Trend Toward Ecommerce


The business world has changed significantly over the past decade. Ecommerce is now a crucial part of the economy, and companies that do not have an online presence will suffer. According to data from research firm eMarketer, ecommerce in the U.S. is expected to grow 14.2 percent in 2015, accounting for 7 percent of total retail sales and reaching a total of $349 billion in sales. As the years go on, online revenue will continue to take a bite out of overall retail sales. AMMEX took the right steps to stay on top of the ecommerce trend, remain ahead of the curve and helps its customers do the same. In addition to embracing ecommerce, AMMEX developed digital marketing resources to increase Web traffic and engage with customers.

Remain competitive with ecommerce

In 2015, having an ecommerce platform is crucial to maintaining a successful business. Customers expect to be able to purchase items online. They are unlikely to work with a vendor that does not provide an ecommerce solution, especially if another local vendor does allow online sales.While there will always be a place for in-store sales, customers enjoy the flexibility of online shopping. According to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Total Retail Survey, nearly half of respondents indicated they like being able to go online whenever they want: day or night.In addition, 27 percent say they shop online because a wider variety of products are available. These days, it is common for businesses to have more inventory available online than in their physical locations. A big-box chain may have 900,000 SKUs available on its Web store. This means all mid-sized distributors that maintain traditional stores need to also have an online site to remain competitive.

Support ecommerce with digital marketing
Many companies fail to adapt to a changing marketplace and perform badly as a result. Just think about how Kodak failed to understand customers’ interest in digital cameras and continued to invest in analog film. Despite being the first company to invent a digital camera, the company filed for bankruptcy in 2012. In contrast, AMMEX recognized early on the need to develop a robust online presence. As a multinational corporation with offices that span the globe, it was necessary for AMMEX to invest in digital solutions. As a result, AMMEX has been named one of the fastest growing companies by both Puget Sound Business Journal and Inc. magazine.

Distributors that partner with AMMEX have the benefit of working with a forward-thinking supplier. AMMEX recognizes the need to support online sales with digital marketing. AMMEX leverages marketing support as a key differentiator. With the shift toward online stores and ecommerce spaces, AMMEX embraces digital marketing.

 “Digital marketing engages customers and earns their trust.” 

Along with the availability of an online store, digital marketing programs are also an important way to keep customers engaged and earn their trust. According to PwC, 56 percent of customers research a purchase by using a search engine. Moreover, customers regularly turn to social media, especially Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, to learn more about companies and their products.

For this reason, AMMEX developed digital marketing assets, which distributors use as a resource when developing their own campaigns. AMMEX provides educational videos, a blog and social channels to educate potential customers and lead them to make a purchase online.

Whether or not customers choose to make a final purchase online, the Internet figures heavily into their decision-making process. It is important for all businesses to have an online presence bolstered heavily by digital marketing efforts such as search engine optimization, social media or email campaigns. AMMEX develops resources to support distributors and help them get started with digital marketing to bring in more customers. AMMEX embraced the digital revolution head on. It is the company’s mission to help customers do the same.

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What to Know: OSHA’s Change MSDSs to SDSs


In 2012, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). The revision sought to make the HCS align more closely with international compliance and provide a more standardized approach to the formatting of OSHA’s material safety data sheets (MSDSs), which will transition to safety data sheets (SDSs). Additionally, the update implemented new labeling requirements. These changes will make the HCS closer to standards of the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).

OSHA is introducing the update gradually. The implementation period started Dec. 1, 2013 and ends June 1, 2016. Employers must be compliant with the SDSs requirement by June 1, 2015.

What the revised HCS entails
The new provisions pertain to distributors, importers and manufacturers of chemicals. While the goal of the HCS, which is to give end users information about hazardous chemicals in products, remains the same, OSHA revised the standard to make the information more accessible. Per OSHA’s standards, these chemicals are:

  • Pyrophoric gases
  • Combustible dust
  • Simple asphyxiants
  • Health or safety hazards for any other reason

Manufacturers, distributors and importers must now communicate these hazards to end users via SDSs, which are largely the same as MSDSs. The key change is the new forms use a 16-section format to make the information easy to digest.

“Employers must be compliant with the SDSs requirement by June 1.”

Overview of the 16 sections
Sections 12 through 15 are the ones that specifically align with the GHS. The preceding sections detail information about the chemicals as well as control measures. The final section is for any other pertinent data.

The sections cover a number of issues. Sections 4, 5 and 6, for instance, list steps for responding to emergencies stemming from the chemical. These include first-aid, firefighting and accidental release measures.

Other sections define the nature of a chemical. What is it and what hazards are associated with it? If the chemical is a substance or mixture, what are the ingredients? What are the physical and chemical properties? These and other factors are covered in Sections 1, 2, 3, 9, 10, 11 and 12.

Other factors addressed in the SDSs include disposal guidelines, storage guidelines, associated regulations and shipping restrictions and requirements.

Caveats to the rules
OSHA has some exceptions to its new rules for SDSs. One particularly important designation is the exemption relating to articles. These items are exempt from the regulations because they do not release the chemical used in their development or present an exposure risk by any other means. For example, nitrile gloves do not need SDSs.

SDS regulations apply to several parts of the supply chain.

For items to be classified as articles, they must meet additional criteria. The product must have a specific design or shape that defines its end use. Disposable gloves are shaped to fit hands and provide barrier protection for those body parts, so they are articles.

One glove-specific exemption is medical-grade gloves. Unlike industrial-grade gloves, which receive oversight from OSHA, these products fall under the purview of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are therefore not liable to the HCS provisions.

How this affects AMMEX and our distributors
AMMEX is currently updating our MSDSs to SDSs. Both distributors and customers have inquired about when the change will be finalized. Per the OSHA deadlines, we encourage all vendors to ensure their products are compliant by the June 1 deadline.

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The History of Disposable Gloves


Disposable gloves had bright beginnings and were developed to address a longstanding need for cleaner practices and barrier protection. By understanding this history, your sales teams will be able to more fully express how essential gloves are to many industries.

Here is an overview of how disposable gloves came to be a necessity for many businesses:

1889
In May 1889, Johns Hopkins Hospital first opened its doors. Dr. William Stewart Halstead, who had a number of medical and surgical achievements, was the first surgeon in chief and one of four founding physicians, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. These achievements included new operations for hernia repair and gallstone removal, among others. Also, Halstead was known for precision and cleanliness, which is why it is no surprise history credits him with developing the first surgical glove.

“The early history of disposable gloves stems from the medical industry.”

After his nurse, and later wife, Caroline Hampton said the chemicals she handled for surgery gave her a rash, Halstead reached out to the Goodyear Rubber Co. to create rubber gloves for her hands. Hampton loved the gloves, and more pairs arrived. Not long after, Halstead’s entire surgical staff wore them during operations. At the time, they assumed the primary benefit was increased dexterity and gave little thought to hygiene.

1894
Joseph Lister, the first surgeon to sterilize his surgical tools and dressings, was responsible for making surgical gloves sterile. In 1894, about 50 percent of all surgical patients died. Many of these fatalities were due to the fact that surgeons did not wash their hands between surgeries and examinations, thereby passing pathogens between patients.

Lister used carbolic acid to sterilize his instruments, according to BBC News. This action would be the founding of antiseptic surgery and the inspiration for the development of Listerine by Joseph Lawrence.

1965
The Ansell Rubber Co. Pty. Ltd. ramped up its funding for surgical glove research in 1941. In 1965, Ansell developed the first disposable medical gloves. The manufacturer sterilized the gloves using gamma irradiation.

1992
In March 1992, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA) published its Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Around this time, there was increased awareness regarding HIV, and OHSA implemented the rule to protect workers who would come in contact with bodily fluids. OSHA’s standard required employers to provide personal protective equipment, including disposable gloves, to these workers.

The administration still requires gloves be worn in many applications, such as phlebotomies.

“Nitrile gloves first arrived on the market in the mid-1990s.”

Mid-1990s
During this time, nitrile disposable gloves first appeared on the market. These gloves, which come from acrylonitrile and butadiene monomers, provide more chemical resistance than latex gloves. Additionally, the gloves were perfect for wearers who had latex allergies and in medical settings where patients could have allergies.

According to Health & Safety International magazine, many manufacturers began working with nitrile after it became clear the material was useful in medical applications. Despite the fact nitrile could be used more often than latex, the synthetic rubber did not serve as a replacement for its predecessor. Rather, it was a product aimed at another market need: chemical resistance.

Today
Disposable gloves were born in the medical industry, and much of the innovation resulted from needs in exam applications. However, in more recent years, attention has shifted to safety uses for disposable gloves, such as automotive, food service and processing, and janitorial-sanitation.

In fact, the industrial market is the fastest growth sector for disposable glove usage. For example, in 2012, this market had the same glove revenue as the medical industry, with most of that revenue coming from nitrile gloves.

Disposable gloves have a rich history and much further to go. If you want to be a part of defining that future, contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor.

 

AMMEXThe History of Disposable Gloves
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Beyond Medical Exam Gloves


Did you know workers in the medical and dental industries use an average of 15 pairs of disposable gloves each day which is 3,960 pairs each year? While this number may appear high, it is not that different – or even the highest usage – compared to glove usage in other industries.

When people think of disposable gloves, they often picture doctors or nurses snapping latex gloves on their hands. However, the medical and dental industries are far from the only places where gloves are used.

Let’s consider the glove revenue for these combined industries, which was nearly $5 billion in 2012. While this is an impressive figure, it is a little more than half the glove revenue for the industrial safety industry. If this is not enough of an indication of how medical and dental glove usage is just a small part of the total market, consider that the revenue share for this sector was approximately 27 percent of the total in 2012.

This is all not to say there are not still opportunities for glove use in exam settings – all applications are projected to see significant growth. Yet, the data does indicate there are a wealth of opportunities to get workers in various industries the gloves they need to get the job done.

AMMEX-Disposable-Gloves-Market-Growth

 

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