High Visibility Sales Results with Orange Nitrile!


The first thing you will most likely notice about Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves is their bright, unique color. Although AMMEX Corporation is well-known for black nitrile gloves, orange nitrile gloves bring something new to the table and are perfect for agricultural, automotive, industrial safety and manufacturing applications, among many others.

Why should you go orange?
Orange nitrile gloves do not just look unique; the color stands out so you are more aware of where you hands are at all times, making them an excellent part of a personal protective equipment (PPE) or high-visibility program. The contrast of the color with dark environments makes workers less likely to be injured. The bright orange stands out against dim work areas, such as industrial environments, garages and under the hoods of vehicles.

Successful PPE programs require collaboration between employers and employees to conduct hazard assessments in their workplaces and minimize risks. Employees must be trained to be aware of hazards and properly wear PPE. Protective gear that is comfortable and easy to don makes employees more likely to utilize it. The orange nitrile gloves have a beaded cuff to prevent ripping and tearing at the base, which makes them easier to put on. In addition, the texture and durability of these gloves do not interfere with the comfort. Nitrile gloves conform to the hands as they are warmed with body heat and are more elastic than vinyl, making them more comfortable for longer use.

“Orange nitrile gloves stand out in dark work environments.”

Other features that will make you want to go orange
The raised diamond texture of the orange nitrile gloves gives them a superior grip. In addition, they are thicker for better durability, which makes them three times as resistant to punctures as latex. Plus, the added thickness increases the gloves’ resistance to harsh chemicals. Wearers are able to safely work with iodine, butane and pesticides for longer without having to change gloves. This helps you save money by using fewer gloves. The bright color also means no more lost gloves in the dark. In addition, the orange matches other brightly colored protective equipment.

Our Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves are available in sizes medium to extra extra large and measure 9.5 inches from base to fingertip. They are sold in boxes of 100 gloves with 10 boxes to a case.

Contact your AMMEX representative or contact us on our website to add these gloves to your product line. If you would like to become a distributor, contact us for more information.

AMMEXHigh Visibility Sales Results with Orange Nitrile!
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Spring is the Busiest Season for Landscapers


Now that the snow has finally melted and the grass is starting to grow again, many people are starting to think about sprucing up their yards and gardens. Landscaping companies may field a higher volume of calls than normal. Therefore, it is important to have the right gear on hand for landscaping projects.

Even places that have been hit by recent droughts, such as California, are considering new landscaping options. Due to water restrictions that are in affect, many residents are thinking about replacing the existing flowers, shrubbery and grass in their yards with desert plants that require less water, according to Palm Springs CBS affiliate KESQ.

Landscapers must be sure to have all the protective gear they need at the ready to complete their contracted projects. Workers need the right gloves to protect their skin from thorns, fertilizers and pesticides. Gloveworks HD Orange Nitrile Glovesstretch synthetic vinyl gloves and GPX3 vinyl gloves are chemically resistant barriers for handling lawn and garden chemicals. Dipped work gloves are also perfect for landscapers. In addition, companies may need face masks to prevent employees from breathing in dirt and dust.

No matter how big or small the landscaping job, companies should be properly equipped with personal protective equipment to handle the task.

For more information, follow this link.

AMMEXSpring is the Busiest Season for Landscapers
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What to Know: OSHA’s Change MSDSs to SDSs


In 2012, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). The revision sought to make the HCS align more closely with international compliance and provide a more standardized approach to the formatting of OSHA’s material safety data sheets (MSDSs), which will transition to safety data sheets (SDSs). Additionally, the update implemented new labeling requirements. These changes will make the HCS closer to standards of the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).

OSHA is introducing the update gradually. The implementation period started Dec. 1, 2013 and ends June 1, 2016. Employers must be compliant with the SDSs requirement by June 1, 2015.

What the revised HCS entails
The new provisions pertain to distributors, importers and manufacturers of chemicals. While the goal of the HCS, which is to give end users information about hazardous chemicals in products, remains the same, OSHA revised the standard to make the information more accessible. Per OSHA’s standards, these chemicals are:

  • Pyrophoric gases
  • Combustible dust
  • Simple asphyxiants
  • Health or safety hazards for any other reason

Manufacturers, distributors and importers must now communicate these hazards to end users via SDSs, which are largely the same as MSDSs. The key change is the new forms use a 16-section format to make the information easy to digest.

“Employers must be compliant with the SDSs requirement by June 1.”

Overview of the 16 sections
Sections 12 through 15 are the ones that specifically align with the GHS. The preceding sections detail information about the chemicals as well as control measures. The final section is for any other pertinent data.

The sections cover a number of issues. Sections 4, 5 and 6, for instance, list steps for responding to emergencies stemming from the chemical. These include first-aid, firefighting and accidental release measures.

Other sections define the nature of a chemical. What is it and what hazards are associated with it? If the chemical is a substance or mixture, what are the ingredients? What are the physical and chemical properties? These and other factors are covered in Sections 1, 2, 3, 9, 10, 11 and 12.

Other factors addressed in the SDSs include disposal guidelines, storage guidelines, associated regulations and shipping restrictions and requirements.

Caveats to the rules
OSHA has some exceptions to its new rules for SDSs. One particularly important designation is the exemption relating to articles. These items are exempt from the regulations because they do not release the chemical used in their development or present an exposure risk by any other means. For example, nitrile gloves do not need SDSs.

SDS regulations apply to several parts of the supply chain.

For items to be classified as articles, they must meet additional criteria. The product must have a specific design or shape that defines its end use. Disposable gloves are shaped to fit hands and provide barrier protection for those body parts, so they are articles.

One glove-specific exemption is medical-grade gloves. Unlike industrial-grade gloves, which receive oversight from OSHA, these products fall under the purview of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are therefore not liable to the HCS provisions.

How this affects AMMEX and our distributors
AMMEX is currently updating our MSDSs to SDSs. Both distributors and customers have inquired about when the change will be finalized. Per the OSHA deadlines, we encourage all vendors to ensure their products are compliant by the June 1 deadline.

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With Spring Comes Warmth and New Hair Colors


Although winter is using its icy grip to claw at the early days of spring, warmer weather is coming, and with it comes new trends in hair color. As numerous clients come in seeking a new hue for their hairdos, salons should stock up on disposable gloves.

Celebrities typically set the tone for popular hair colors and styles, and this spring will see inspiration from Kim Kardashian, Miley Cyrus and Amy Adams, according to Forbes. Platinum blonde may be coming back in a big way, and bold contrast between roots and tips has become popular. Rose-colored hair is also making headway, according to Style magazine.

Not only are stylists going to perform the initial coloring, they will also see clients for routine maintenance. With multiple coloring appointments and the use of many chemicals, stylists need a pair of gloves that is up to the task. Vinyl gloves are perfect for this application, as they provide protection against coloring agents and other styling chemicals and are affordable for numerous glove changes. Alternatively, black nitrile gloves are a great option to mask the discoloration of gloves by the hair color and dye.

Whether clients want to welcome spring with a few highlights or the pixel hair color craze that is sweeping the Internet, stylists should protect their hands while they tackle the expanded business.

For more information, follow this link.

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Accelerate your Disposable Glove Sales with AMMEX


You may be a superstar at selling disposable gloves but what should you do to boost your sales even further? If you know anything about heroes, whether caped crusaders or your local firefighters, you know they never have to work alone when fighting the good fight.

Teamwork wins, which is why you should take advantage of the unique sales support services offered by AMMEX’s Sales Acceleration Solution®. When you partner with AMMEX you get much more than a supplier, you get a wide array of marketing and sales help to skyrocket your profits and reach a broader client base.

If you are not convinced yet, our new infographic highlights all the advantages of teaming up with AMMEX:

 

AMMEX-Team-up-to-grow-your-glove-sales

Become a glove expert 

At AMMEX, we pride ourselves on our extensive knowledge of disposable gloves. Not only do we consider ourselves experts, but we expect the same of our clients. Whether it’s learning how latex gloves are made or the benefits of nitrile gloves, we have you covered with product and training videos to make you a glove expert in no time!

“We have product and training videos to make you a glove expert in no time!”

These tools also help with your sales in addition to your growing glove knowledge, as they are useful for passing information onto your customers. Customers who view these types of videos are 144 percent more likely to buy your gloves.

Reel in customers with a hands-on experience

Everyone likes to try before they buy, whether it’s samples at the grocery store or trial periods for software. For this reason, we provide the glove samples you need to give your customers the tactile experience of shopping for the right disposable gloves.

Your customers will be able to examine the materials, sizing, fit and other features to get the perfect gloves the first time they buy – lessening the frequency of returns. If you think this sounds too good to be true, consider that free samples helped a large chain store boost its cheese and pizza sales by 100 percent and 600 percent, respectively.

Put your name out there

When you join AMMEX’s league of glove-selling superheroes, you get to take center stage in your market. We have a number of promotional tools to improve your market visibility.

Here are the tools available to you:

  • Search engine spotlight: Search engine optimization is key for any business, as 89 percent of consumers base their spending decisions on search engine results. We have a number of high-quality images and other information crafted to jumpstart your online visibility.
  • Social media supercharge: Did you know 67 percent of Twitter users and 51 percent of Facebook users are more likely to buy your gloves simply because they follow you? To increase your number of subscribers, we produce a plethora of eye-catching and rebloggable posts and articles.
  • Brand booster: A business’s identity is as important as its prices, which is why we help you build your brand. When it comes to disposable gloves, AMMEX is a trusted brand, so why not share in that positive image by teaming up with us?

Tackle the challenges of today’s sales environment

The nature of sales is always evolving, and we at AMMEX understand what it takes to keep our clients up to date on the latest trends related to and strategies for selling gloves. We don’t just give you gloves to sell – we help you sell more.

Contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor. If you are already a distributor, speak with your salesperson to discover more about teaming up with AMMEX and the advantages of our Sales Acceleration Solution®.

AMMEXAccelerate your Disposable Glove Sales with AMMEX
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March Madness: Team Nitrile


Sometimes, the game calls for aggressive players, and for March Madness: Team Nitrile delivers the “Xtreme” intensity needed to command the court. These gloves play hard in the paint to provide exceptional barrier protection, with the best chemical and tear resistance among all glove materials.

Here is our starting lineup for March Madness:  Team Nitrile:

Orange nitrile


These are the most aggressive gloves on the team. With a raised diamond texture to provide superior grip, no oily defenders are stripping the ball or tools away from them. Plus, Orange Nitrile Gloves provide superior chemical resistance to stay in the game longer in automotive, industrial safety and other applications.

Black nitrile


These gloves have long served as the star player of Team Nitrile, putting both AMMEX and the team on the map. One fan said her favorite feature of Black Nitrile Gloves is the sleek color that “conceals dirt, grease, and grime!”

Indigo nitrile


If you need a glove that will box out harmful pathogens or drive to the hole against tough chemicals, then you want Indigo Nitrile Gloves. These gloves play on any court, from the medical to industrial sectors and anything in between. They are also great for tattoo parlors.

Xtreme nitrile


Some gloves play to win and others play to dominate. If you are looking for disposable gloves that will deliver a landslide victory every time, go with Team Nitrile. AMMEX Xtreme nitrile series are ideal for safety and hygiene against a wide variety of opponents. Pick from our Xtreme Extra Long gloves for added protection or Xtreme Green for an easily identifiable target.

AMMEX is a premier importer and distributor of high-quality disposable gloves and barrier protection products. Established in 1988, AMMEX grew into a multinational corporation with offices in the United States, Philippines, China, and Malaysia. We support our AMMEX wholesale distributors with quality products, outstanding service, competitive prices, and proven marketing support to grow their glove sales. Today, AMMEX proudly supplies a wide selection of disposable gloves and personal protection equipment to thousands of distributors in a variety of industries. Whether your clients are in food service, janitorial, medical or automotive, AMMEX has the disposable gloves you need.  Contact us to today become a distributor and add nitrile gloves to your bracket!

 

AMMEXMarch Madness: Team Nitrile
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HACCP without the Hiccup


Disposable gloves come in a variety of colors, but this is not simply for wearer preferences. Some colors are more common in one industry than in another. Automotive technicians, for example, are fond of black nitrile gloves because the color seems suitable for their job, but the color has no bearing on the gloves’ usefulness.

In other industries, however, colors serve a greater purpose. This is because of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) rules.

“HACCP provides strict oversight at each step of food production.” 

What is HACCP?
This regulation includes a set of guidelines to ensure that food processing occurs in a safe manner from start to finish. HACCP provides strict oversight at each step of the production process to make certain consumers get food products without physical, chemical or microbiological risks. Using scientific and logical strategies, regulators identify hazards, put controls in place to limit those hazards and conduct tests to ensure those controls are effective.

This control method came from Pillsbury microbiologist Dr. Howard E. Bauman and other researchers in 1959. The company worked with NASA under contract to develop a food that would not crumble or contain pathogens or parasites in spacecraft with the astronauts. The formal presentation of HACCP came a little over a decade later in 1971 at the National Conference on Food Protection in Denver.

Through the years, HACCP grew from three principles to seven, reaching its current framework in 1992. The seven principles include:

  1. Conducting hard analyses: Plants identify hazards.
  2. Determining control points: This principle involves identifying steps in the production cycle where plants should implement preventative measures.
  3. Setting critical limits: Plants determine the extent to which they must control identified hazards.
  4. Implementing monitoring procedures for each control point: Plants establish procedures to ensure workers implement controls at control points.
  5. Creating corrective actions: If monitoring reveals critical limits are not met, plants must enforce corrective actions.
  6. Implementing record-keeping procedures: Plants must keep record of all information relating to the aforementioned principles.
  7. Verifying that HACCP is working effectively: The final principle ensures a plant’s HACCP plan works through inspections.

From its inception to now, HACCP has expanded to a number of industries, including canning and meat processing.

What does HACCP check?
While HACCP is a detailed process that implements numerous assessments and controls along the food processing cycle, it is not completely comprehensive. However, it does indicate food producers are taking the most extensive measures possible to ensure food safety.

The International HACCP Alliance noted the brunt of attention goes toward microbiological hazards, which require a microscope to detect and include listeria and E. coli. Chemical hazards, such as antibiotics and pesticides, are also present and feared by some consumers.

“Color coding gloves helps with HACCP compliance.”

Where do disposable gloves fit in?
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) already requires glove use in food processing, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires HACCP for meat processing plants in the U.S. Plus, HACCP is required for seafood and juice. With these controls already in place, some may wonder what else gloves will do to further assist in compliance.

That is where the colors become important. One of the biggest issues with food safety hazards is cross contamination. If workers do not change gloves between tasks, there is risk of a transfer of microorganisms. For example, contamination occurs if workers switch from working with raw meat, which contains harmful bacteria, to handling cooked meat. The same is true of the transition between cleaning and processing fruit, respectively. To address these issues, food producers use color coding for their disposable gloves.

Another example of a HACCP principle in use is of a plant that processes both meat and seafood. Blue vinyl gloves could designate seafood products, while managers could limit translucent vinyl gloves to meat. While a seemingly small difference, the color coding can go a long way toward ensuring workers remember to change gloves when switching between tasks.

HACCP includes a wide range of checks and balances, of which gloves are only a small part. However, they are no less important than any other preventative measures because they help reduce possible food recalls and improve food quality.

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Why Nitrile Gloves are Best for Dairy Farming


Disposable gloves have many uses in agriculture, especially when it comes to dairy farming. Nitrile gloves, for example, are perfect for this application.

According to Progressive Dairyman, gloves have experienced increased usage in this industry over the past ten years. This is because of a need for improved worker and animal health – not to mention, a desire to produce higher-quality milk. In fact, nearly 50 percent of all dairy farms use gloves because of these reasons.

Nitrile gloves in particular provide several benefits:

  • Cleaner milk due to less bacteria transferred from hands to the milk, as the bacteria does not adhere to the nitrile as easily as to the crevices of your hands
  • Protection against repeated exposure to teat dips
  • Superior resistance to iodine used to prevent contamination between cows, a resistance not found with latex gloves

Progressive Dairyman noted this sanitation practice is crucial for dairy farms. If cows become infected, they represent lost revenue. This problem becomes worse if an infection spreads between cows. Rather than risking lost profits and low-quality milk, dairy farmers should be sure to replenish their nitrile glove supplies to get the appropriate level of barrier protection.

For more information, follow this link.

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How Nitrile and Vinyl Gloves are Made


Unlike latex gloves, nitrile and vinyl gloves do not come from natural rubber. These gloves come from synthetic materials, but the manufacturing process is not too different from latex glove production.

Here is an overview of how manufacturers create these gloves:

Creating the synthetic materials
The processes for creating the nitrile and vinyl materials is similar.

The nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) used for nitrile gloves is a copolymer, which is a substance derived through the bonding of different molecules. In the case of NBR, the two parts are butadiene and acrylonitrile, which chemists combine using a process known as copolymerization. These molecules provide specific advantages for the gloves: Acrylonitrile enhances the chemical resistance, while butadiene creates flexibility and tear resistance.

Vinyl gloves come from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) monomers alone. Because chemists use only one species of monomer to create PVC, the material is known as a polymer. Once they have polymerized the substance, the chemists add a chemical called a plasticizer to the PVC. The plasticizer makes the material flexible – otherwise, the PVC would be rigid, as it is when used to form pipe. PVC is inexpensive to create, making it a cost-effective alternative to latex and for applications where glove changes occur frequently.

“Chemists combine molecules to create PVC and NBR for disposable gloves.  For easier donning, nitrile gloves undergo chlorination or polymer coating.”

Producing the gloves
Once the synthetic materials are available, they go to the factory for production. With a few exceptions, this process is mostly the same as the steps for manufacturing latex gloves:

  • The manufacturing equipment first runs ceramic, hand-shaped formers through water and bleach to clean them and remove any residue from the previous run. The formers then dry to remove all the water. Then, they dip in a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium nitrate, which helps the synthetic materials coagulate around the formers. Afterward, the formers dry again.
  • The equipment dips the formers in tanks full of NBR or PVC. The following step involves heating the materials at a high temperature to form the gloves as they dry.
  • For easier donning, nitrile gloves undergo one of two processes: chlorination or polymer coating. Chlorination involves exposing the gloves to chlorine – as an acid mixture or gas – to make the material harder and more slick. Polymer coating lubricates the glove surface by adding a layer of polymer.
  • Finally, in what is known as the stripping phase, the gloves are removed from the formers. This is called the stripping phase.

Checking for quality
The last steps of the manufacturing cycle include testing the gloves and shipping them.

The quality control process, which is based on standards from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ATSM) and regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), includes the pinhole leak test. While all gloves have some pinholes, this test tells manufacturers whether a glove has enough pinholes to lead to a noticeable leak.

After filling the gloves with 1 liter of water, the workers hang them upside down for two minutes to see if the gloves can hold the water. Exam-grade gloves undergo more intensive testing than industrial-grade gloves – the latter is composed of gloves that meet basic quality tests but not the higher standards for exam grading.

These tests adhere to acceptable quality limits (AQLs), which are percentages indicating how many gloves in a batch must fail the test to determine if the entire batch fails.

The final step is for workers to package and pack the gloves. Then, the gloves ship from the manufacturing facilitates in Southeast Asia via ocean freight to their final destinations. With this journey, the gloves have taken the final step from being molecules to effective barrier protection.

AMMEXHow Nitrile and Vinyl Gloves are Made
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The History of Disposable Gloves


Disposable gloves had bright beginnings and were developed to address a longstanding need for cleaner practices and barrier protection. By understanding this history, your sales teams will be able to more fully express how essential gloves are to many industries.

Here is an overview of how disposable gloves came to be a necessity for many businesses:

1889
In May 1889, Johns Hopkins Hospital first opened its doors. Dr. William Stewart Halstead, who had a number of medical and surgical achievements, was the first surgeon in chief and one of four founding physicians, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. These achievements included new operations for hernia repair and gallstone removal, among others. Also, Halstead was known for precision and cleanliness, which is why it is no surprise history credits him with developing the first surgical glove.

“The early history of disposable gloves stems from the medical industry.”

After his nurse, and later wife, Caroline Hampton said the chemicals she handled for surgery gave her a rash, Halstead reached out to the Goodyear Rubber Co. to create rubber gloves for her hands. Hampton loved the gloves, and more pairs arrived. Not long after, Halstead’s entire surgical staff wore them during operations. At the time, they assumed the primary benefit was increased dexterity and gave little thought to hygiene.

1894
Joseph Lister, the first surgeon to sterilize his surgical tools and dressings, was responsible for making surgical gloves sterile. In 1894, about 50 percent of all surgical patients died. Many of these fatalities were due to the fact that surgeons did not wash their hands between surgeries and examinations, thereby passing pathogens between patients.

Lister used carbolic acid to sterilize his instruments, according to BBC News. This action would be the founding of antiseptic surgery and the inspiration for the development of Listerine by Joseph Lawrence.

1965
The Ansell Rubber Co. Pty. Ltd. ramped up its funding for surgical glove research in 1941. In 1965, Ansell developed the first disposable medical gloves. The manufacturer sterilized the gloves using gamma irradiation.

1992
In March 1992, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA) published its Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Around this time, there was increased awareness regarding HIV, and OHSA implemented the rule to protect workers who would come in contact with bodily fluids. OSHA’s standard required employers to provide personal protective equipment, including disposable gloves, to these workers.

The administration still requires gloves be worn in many applications, such as phlebotomies.

“Nitrile gloves first arrived on the market in the mid-1990s.”

Mid-1990s
During this time, nitrile disposable gloves first appeared on the market. These gloves, which come from acrylonitrile and butadiene monomers, provide more chemical resistance than latex gloves. Additionally, the gloves were perfect for wearers who had latex allergies and in medical settings where patients could have allergies.

According to Health & Safety International magazine, many manufacturers began working with nitrile after it became clear the material was useful in medical applications. Despite the fact nitrile could be used more often than latex, the synthetic rubber did not serve as a replacement for its predecessor. Rather, it was a product aimed at another market need: chemical resistance.

Today
Disposable gloves were born in the medical industry, and much of the innovation resulted from needs in exam applications. However, in more recent years, attention has shifted to safety uses for disposable gloves, such as automotive, food service and processing, and janitorial-sanitation.

In fact, the industrial market is the fastest growth sector for disposable glove usage. For example, in 2012, this market had the same glove revenue as the medical industry, with most of that revenue coming from nitrile gloves.

Disposable gloves have a rich history and much further to go. If you want to be a part of defining that future, contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor.

 

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