Why Nitrile Gloves are Best for Dairy Farming


Disposable gloves have many uses in agriculture, especially when it comes to dairy farming. Nitrile gloves, for example, are perfect for this application.

According to Progressive Dairyman, gloves have experienced increased usage in this industry over the past ten years. This is because of a need for improved worker and animal health – not to mention, a desire to produce higher-quality milk. In fact, nearly 50 percent of all dairy farms use gloves because of these reasons.

Nitrile gloves in particular provide several benefits:

  • Cleaner milk due to less bacteria transferred from hands to the milk, as the bacteria does not adhere to the nitrile as easily as to the crevices of your hands
  • Protection against repeated exposure to teat dips
  • Superior resistance to iodine used to prevent contamination between cows, a resistance not found with latex gloves

Progressive Dairyman noted this sanitation practice is crucial for dairy farms. If cows become infected, they represent lost revenue. This problem becomes worse if an infection spreads between cows. Rather than risking lost profits and low-quality milk, dairy farmers should be sure to replenish their nitrile glove supplies to get the appropriate level of barrier protection.

For more information, follow this link.

AMMEXWhy Nitrile Gloves are Best for Dairy Farming
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How Nitrile and Vinyl Gloves are Made


Unlike latex gloves, nitrile and vinyl gloves do not come from natural rubber. These gloves come from synthetic materials, but the manufacturing process is not too different from latex glove production.

Here is an overview of how manufacturers create these gloves:

Creating the synthetic materials
The processes for creating the nitrile and vinyl materials is similar.

The nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) used for nitrile gloves is a copolymer, which is a substance derived through the bonding of different molecules. In the case of NBR, the two parts are butadiene and acrylonitrile, which chemists combine using a process known as copolymerization. These molecules provide specific advantages for the gloves: Acrylonitrile enhances the chemical resistance, while butadiene creates flexibility and tear resistance.

Vinyl gloves come from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) monomers alone. Because chemists use only one species of monomer to create PVC, the material is known as a polymer. Once they have polymerized the substance, the chemists add a chemical called a plasticizer to the PVC. The plasticizer makes the material flexible – otherwise, the PVC would be rigid, as it is when used to form pipe. PVC is inexpensive to create, making it a cost-effective alternative to latex and for applications where glove changes occur frequently.

“Chemists combine molecules to create PVC and NBR for disposable gloves.  For easier donning, nitrile gloves undergo chlorination or polymer coating.” 

Producing the gloves
Once the synthetic materials are available, they go to the factory for production. With a few exceptions, this process is mostly the same as the steps for manufacturing latex gloves:

  • The manufacturing equipment first runs ceramic, hand-shaped formers through water and bleach to clean them and remove any residue from the previous run. The formers then dry to remove all the water. Then, they dip in a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium nitrate, which helps the synthetic materials coagulate around the formers. Afterward, the formers dry again.
  • The equipment dips the formers in tanks full of NBR or PVC. The following step involves heating the materials at a high temperature to form the gloves as they dry.
  • For easier donning, nitrile gloves undergo one of two processes: chlorination or polymer coating. Chlorination involves exposing the gloves to chlorine – as an acid mixture or gas – to make the material harder and more slick. Polymer coating lubricates the glove surface by adding a layer of polymer.
  • Finally, in what is known as the stripping phase, the gloves are removed from the formers. This is called the stripping phase.

Checking for quality
The last steps of the manufacturing cycle include testing the gloves and shipping them.

The quality control process, which is based on standards from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ATSM) and regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), includes the pinhole leak test. While all gloves have some pinholes, this test tells manufacturers whether a glove has enough pinholes to lead to a noticeable leak.

After filling the gloves with 1 liter of water, the workers hang them upside down for two minutes to see if the gloves can hold the water. Exam-grade gloves undergo more intensive testing than industrial-grade gloves – the latter is composed of gloves that meet basic quality tests but not the higher standards for exam grading.

These tests adhere to acceptable quality limits (AQLs), which are percentages indicating how many gloves in a batch must fail the test to determine if the entire batch fails.

The final step is for workers to package and pack the gloves. Then, the gloves ship from the manufacturing facilitates in Southeast Asia via ocean freight to their final destinations. With this journey, the gloves have taken the final step from being molecules to effective barrier protection.

AMMEXHow Nitrile and Vinyl Gloves are Made
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The History of Disposable Gloves


Disposable gloves had bright beginnings and were developed to address a longstanding need for cleaner practices and barrier protection. By understanding this history, your sales teams will be able to more fully express how essential gloves are to many industries.

Here is an overview of how disposable gloves came to be a necessity for many businesses:

1889
In May 1889, Johns Hopkins Hospital first opened its doors. Dr. William Stewart Halstead, who had a number of medical and surgical achievements, was the first surgeon in chief and one of four founding physicians, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. These achievements included new operations for hernia repair and gallstone removal, among others. Also, Halstead was known for precision and cleanliness, which is why it is no surprise history credits him with developing the first surgical glove.

“The early history of disposable gloves stems from the medical industry.”

After his nurse, and later wife, Caroline Hampton said the chemicals she handled for surgery gave her a rash, Halstead reached out to the Goodyear Rubber Co. to create rubber gloves for her hands. Hampton loved the gloves, and more pairs arrived. Not long after, Halstead’s entire surgical staff wore them during operations. At the time, they assumed the primary benefit was increased dexterity and gave little thought to hygiene.

1894
Joseph Lister, the first surgeon to sterilize his surgical tools and dressings, was responsible for making surgical gloves sterile. In 1894, about 50 percent of all surgical patients died. Many of these fatalities were due to the fact that surgeons did not wash their hands between surgeries and examinations, thereby passing pathogens between patients.

Lister used carbolic acid to sterilize his instruments, according to BBC News. This action would be the founding of antiseptic surgery and the inspiration for the development of Listerine by Joseph Lawrence.

1965
The Ansell Rubber Co. Pty. Ltd. ramped up its funding for surgical glove research in 1941. In 1965, Ansell developed the first disposable medical gloves. The manufacturer sterilized the gloves using gamma irradiation.

1992
In March 1992, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA) published its Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Around this time, there was increased awareness regarding HIV, and OHSA implemented the rule to protect workers who would come in contact with bodily fluids. OSHA’s standard required employers to provide personal protective equipment, including disposable gloves, to these workers.

The administration still requires gloves be worn in many applications, such as phlebotomies.

“Nitrile gloves first arrived on the market in the mid-1990s.”

Mid-1990s
During this time, nitrile disposable gloves first appeared on the market. These gloves, which come from acrylonitrile and butadiene monomers, provide more chemical resistance than latex gloves. Additionally, the gloves were perfect for wearers who had latex allergies and in medical settings where patients could have allergies.

According to Health & Safety International magazine, many manufacturers began working with nitrile after it became clear the material was useful in medical applications. Despite the fact nitrile could be used more often than latex, the synthetic rubber did not serve as a replacement for its predecessor. Rather, it was a product aimed at another market need: chemical resistance.

Today
Disposable gloves were born in the medical industry, and much of the innovation resulted from needs in exam applications. However, in more recent years, attention has shifted to safety uses for disposable gloves, such as automotive, food service and processing, and janitorial-sanitation.

In fact, the industrial market is the fastest growth sector for disposable glove usage. For example, in 2012, this market had the same glove revenue as the medical industry, with most of that revenue coming from nitrile gloves.

Disposable gloves have a rich history and much further to go. If you want to be a part of defining that future, contact an AMMEX representative today or contact us on our website to get started on becoming a distributor.

 

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What Does Your Glove Vendor do for You?


When was the last time you stopped and evaluated your relationship with your disposable glove vendor? Sure, they sell you gloves, but what do they do to help you sell those gloves to your customers?

Not all vendors will provide you with what you need to become successful selling their products, and you don’t have to be content with that type of relationship. In fact, you should seek something more akin to a partnership that helps you grow and develop in your glove sales strategies. Batman did not hand Robin a bunch of gadgets and send his young ward off to fight crime alone, and you should not get that treatment from any vendor.

With AMMEX, you become part of a similar dynamic duo. We want to see you succeed and provide the tools, guidance and assistance so you will achieve your glove sales goals.

What do you get for your money?
When evaluating your vendor, you must look at a variety of factors to determine if that interaction is more relational or transactional. While the transaction is a part of any relationship with the vendor, it should not be the only part.  If your vendor’s sales representatives contact you only when it’s time to reorder, you may not be in a strong relationship.  AMMEX

Here are some questions to ask yourself to determine if your vendor is taking the extra step:

  • Does the vendor understand full scope of your business? According to ZDNet, this is one of the most important aspects of evaluating a vendor. If your glove supplier does not understand what you do or your market, how will it ensure you are getting the right types of gloves for your customers? For example, say you own a wholesale auto parts company, and your sales contact is pushing you to supply medical gloves. That vendor is not advising the best product for your market.
  • Does the vendor keep in touch? This means more than checking in when your supply is low. Is your supplier recommending new products, and are those products viable for your market? When new industry trends appear, does your vendor keep you posted and provide some strategies for how to leverage those trends for sales? You do not want a vendor that is on autopilot during the entire relationship.
  • Does the vendor give you strategies for success? If your supplier has not given you some best practices for how to sell disposable gloves, then you are working with the wrong vendor. While gloves are useful in a number of industries, emerging market opportunities where employees traditionally did not wear gloves still present some opposition. What, if anything, is your vendor doing to help your team overcome those challenges?

The AMMEX total package
When you are tired of not maximizing the opportunity, then it is time to succeed with the best. Let AMMEX supercharge your sales teams when it comes to glove sales. In addition to supply, we provide sales and marketing support.

AMMEX provides industry specific materials including marketing and samples tailored to your specific customer base. You will also receive custom flyers for your business. This allows you to get your customers up to date about all of AMMEX’s offerings while promoting your business as their one-stop shop for their barrier protection needs.

“Let AMMEX supercharge your sales teams.”

Do not think we are going to send you a bunch of marketing and sales supplies, and you are own your own. Before you get started, at AMMEX we not only get to know your business, but also provides insight to potential customers around your business. We evaluate your current customers and help you find new ways to generate sales. Additionally, we will keep you posted on any trends that could impact your sales and provide regular calls to ensure you are getting the most out of AMMEX’s products and support. We don’t want you to add a SKU if it is not the right thing for your business.

Like any vendor, we will let you know when we have new products. However, we will not inundate you with a ton of new gloves without telling your how they will work for your customers. Our Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile gloves, for example, provide a number of features, and if you have an industrial factory nearby, we are going to tell you the value proposition these gloves have for those customers.

What does your glove vendor do for you?  Any vendor can sell you gloves. AMMEX is here to help you sell more. Contact your dedicated AMMEX representative today or contact us to become a distributor today!  If you already partner with AMMEX but do not fully utilize the aforementioned sales and marketing tools, speak with your salesperson to take advantage of these services.

Be the disposable glove supplier your customers need with the AMMEX advantage.

AMMEXWhat Does Your Glove Vendor do for You?
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Get a Grip: A Glove Texture Introduction


While you may be aware of how various applications call for different disposable glove materials, how much do you know about glove textures?

How to describe glove textures
Glove texture comes from the formers during production. Currently, there is no standard for describing the extent to which gloves are textured. Some gloves are only textured on the fingertips while others are fully textured.

Imagine the surface of a textured glove as a mountain range. If the valleys are deeper, the texture is more prominent. This allows more liquid to pass through the channels and for the glove to make greater contact with the surface of an object.

“AMMEX Disposable gloves have various levels of texture.”

Here is an overview of texture types:

Smooth: These are gloves that do not have any texture, and most are vinyl. Smooth gloves are suitable for applications such as hair care, food preparation and food service.

Micro-roughened: This is the lightest form of texturing and is mostly for nitrile and latex gloves. In fact, 95 percent of nitrile gloves are microroughened. These gloves have a surface that appears to be lightly sanded and are great for medical applications because they provide additional grip for holding tools without disturbing patients or procedures. Additionally, they are more suitable for gripping small objects.

Aggressively textured: This category has the most intense level of texture. AMMEX Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves, for example, have a diamond raised texture, which is particularly useful for gripping fasteners, nuts and bolts when the glove is slippery. Manufacturers produce these gloves on textured formers, which require more material. This added thickness provides additional grip and protection.

The grip on latex gloves is not entirely from texture. Instead, manufacturers alter the finishing process by using less chlorine during chlorination to maintain surface tackiness.

Why use textured gloves
Wearers of gloves can’t always control the environment, so choosing the right glove for the application they are being used in is essential. Texture is a key consideration when selecting the right glove for the job.

AMMEXGet a Grip: A Glove Texture Introduction
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Preload Your Sales for 2015


They say the early bird gets the worm, and this is much more than a cliche when it comes to your disposable glove sales for the year.

In fact, the start of 2015 is the best time to ramp up your sales activity and set a strong pace for the next 365 days. This is because gloves are a residual sales product. Once you land a customer, you will have consistent, ongoing business, and here is how:

Opportunity is out there
For many industries, gloves are a necessity, and for others, this personal protective equipment is an added safety measure and convenience. Whatever the case, demand for gloves is growing, and distributors need to supply gloves to meet that demand.

The industrial, safety and chemical industries, for example, are key markets for glove sales. Despite the common association of disposable gloves and the medical industry, the industrial and safety sector had glove revenue that was on par with the former industry – both at $4.4 billion.

“You have opportunity for disposable glove sales in many industries.  Relationship building is key to the success of any sales interaction.”

Additionally, these and other industries, such as food processing, food servicejanitorial/sanitation and automotive, are due for large-scale growth in the future. In the food processing and service sectors, for instance, workers are already using up to 20 pairs per day. With these industries having combined growth potential of 29 percent, imagine the possibilities for increased sales.

Plus, consider that gloves are not a one-time deal. Once your customers run out, they will be calling back for more, which means you have guaranteed business as long as you maintain those relationships.

Cultivating relationships with customers
According to Baylor University’s Keller Center for Research, relationship building is key to the success of any sales interaction. You want to build loyalty with your customers, and disposable gloves encourage this behavior.

With a one-time sale, you can contact customers, sell the products and never speak to them again except for follow-up calls or to sell them new products. Because gloves are a residual sales product, you must keep constant contact with customers, which lends to building those relationships

“Relationship building is key to the success of any sales interaction.”

Not only is this beneficial for talking to your customers about restocking their glove supplies, but it also presents the opportunity to tell them about other products. This is particularly useful for selling new products. If, for instance, you have a customer who regularly purchases GlovePlus Black Nitrile Gloves, these frequent calls are the time to tell that customer about upgrading to Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves.

Maintaining business throughout the year
By listening to and engaging with your customers through regular interaction, you demonstrate your expertise and ability to give them the right gloves for the job. By building this customer loyalty, you hold those relationships with existing customers, but what about untapped sources?

Many industries need gloves, and any potential customers who are not buying from you are buying from someone else. Pinpoint the reasons why you are losing them to the competition and leverage your expertise to net these clients. Let the nature of disposable gloves be the relationship-building tool that sets you apart.

AMMEXPreload Your Sales for 2015
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Orange Nitrile: Give Your Sales Team the Best


Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves have an aggressive texture for superior grip. While AMMEX Corporation is typically known for black nitrile gloves, we stepped outside of the box to deliver a product most people have not seen before.  Orange Nitrile: Give Your Sales Team the Best!

Unique color for high visibility
One of the first things you will notice about our orange nitrile gloves is their bright color. We ramped up our nitrile gloves with a hue that will be seen even in dark environments, including garages and industrial environments. This color means no more lost gloves and is a fitting match for other brightly colored personal protective equipment.

Heavy, aggressive texture for strong grip and durability
These ambidextrous gloves also have a diamond-raised texture on both sides for a non-slip grip. This texture is present on the palms and fingertips and particularly helpful for oily environments. As a result, automotive, manufacturing and industrial technicians who handle tools do not have to worry about their equipment sliding out of their hands while they work on vehicles and machines.

Not only does this texture provide superior grip, it also offers additional thickness for increased durability. In fact, our orange nitrile gloves are three times more puncture resistant than latex. In addition, the texture does not compromise comfort, as the gloves are more elastic than vinyl and conform to hands as they are warmed by body heat.

These gloves feature a beaded cuff to stop ripping and tearing at the base. This feature also makes the gloves easier to don.

“AMMEX’s orange nitrile gloves provide superior grip even in oily situations.”

Added thickness for superb chemical resistance
If you think visibility, durability and grip are all impressive features of our orange nitrile gloves, wait until you hear about their chemical resistance. The extra thickness allows wearers to work with harsh chemicals such as iodine, butane and pesticides for a longer period of time before they have to change gloves, allowing for greater cost savings due to fewer glove changes.

Get on board with our premium gloves
Our Gloveworks Heavy Duty Orange Nitrile Gloves, which measure 9.5 inches from base to fingertip and are available in sizes medium to extra extra large, are perfect for a number of applications, including: agricultural, automotive, industrial safety, manufacturing, paint shops and plumbing. Additionally, they come 100 gloves to a box and 10 boxes to a case to provide the supply you need.

Orange Nitrile: Give Your Sales Team the Best! Contact your AMMEX representative to add these gloves to your product line. Or, if you would like to become a distributor, contact us today!

AMMEXOrange Nitrile: Give Your Sales Team the Best
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Beyond Medical Exam Gloves


Did you know workers in the medical and dental industries use an average of 15 pairs of disposable gloves each day which is 3,960 pairs each year? While this number may appear high, it is not that different – or even the highest usage – compared to glove usage in other industries.

When people think of disposable gloves, they often picture doctors or nurses snapping latex gloves on their hands. However, the medical and dental industries are far from the only places where gloves are used.

Let’s consider the glove revenue for these combined industries, which was nearly $5 billion in 2012. While this is an impressive figure, it is a little more than half the glove revenue for the industrial safety industry. If this is not enough of an indication of how medical and dental glove usage is just a small part of the total market, consider that the revenue share for this sector was approximately 27 percent of the total in 2012.

This is all not to say there are not still opportunities for glove use in exam settings – all applications are projected to see significant growth. Yet, the data does indicate there are a wealth of opportunities to get workers in various industries the gloves they need to get the job done.

AMMEX-Disposable-Gloves-Market-Growth

 

AMMEXBeyond Medical Exam Gloves
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Changes: Gloves in the Automotive Industry


Changes: Gloves in the Automotive Industry


Not long ago, if you asked automotive technicians about wearing disposable gloves, they probably would’ve laughed.

These workers traditionally did not wear gloves, but that practice is going out the window.  In fact, technicians in this industry on average wear 13 pairs of gloves each day – and in some cases up to 16 pairs.

So what is driving the disposable glove revenue growth – about $1 billion in 2012 and projected to reach $1.3 billion in 2022 – in the automotive industry? The answer is protection from harsh chemicals, which is why 80 percent of the gloves used in this application are nitrile gloves. As more auto technicians wear gloves, this is a key growth area for distributors.


AMMEX-Disposable-Gloves-Market-Growth

 

AMMEXChanges: Gloves in the Automotive Industry
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Disposable Glove Usage: Industrial Safety and Chemical


Did you know the industrial, safety and chemical industries had the highest disposable glove revenue, on par with the medical and dental industry in 2012? Not only was this sector the top contender for industrial markets that year, analysts project it will continue to have the second highest overall revenue by 2022.

While industrial safety is a broad area, one need remains key: chemical protection. This is why nitrile gloves account for 65 percent of the glove material distribution in this industry.

Considering the American Burn Association said 3 percent of hospital admissions for burns from 2003 to 2012 were for chemical burns, and 9 percent of all burns were occupational, workers in the industrial and safety industry are vital potential customers for nitrile and other glove materials that offer chemical resistance.

 

AMMEX-Disposable-Gloves-Market-Growth

 

AMMEXDisposable Glove Usage: Industrial Safety and Chemical
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