Unexpected Uses for Disposable Gloves: Fishing


Who would have thought that disposable gloves could be an excellent holiday gift! According to The Vancouver Columbian, nitrile gloves are a perfect holiday gift for individuals who enjoy outdoor activities such as fishing.

Many anglers like to wear gloves when they are on the water, and the holiday season is the perfect time to promote nitrile gloves. In Vancouver’s lower Columbia area, for example, fishers typically use the gloves during the spring chinook salmon season, according to the source.

One key selling point for glove usage while fishing is gloves are useful when releasing fish, Field & Stream reported. Anglers need to grasp the fish without harming it’s vital organs by holding too tightly. A textured nitrile glove provides the necessary grip.

Additionally, the Vancouver Columbian noted these gloves are useful for sardine wrapping a lure. Because there is a barrier between wearers and the sardines, the scent of the wearers’ hands will not get on the bait. Plus, because these gloves offer top-notch dexterity, they are suitable for the minute tasks that come with fishing, such as stringing a lure or cleaning fish.

With these advantages in mind, it is a great idea to purchase nitrile gloves along with their other fishing-related gifts. Not to mention, they are great to have on have on hand for boat motor repairs and cleanup.

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All About Powdered Gloves


If disposable glove wearers need a product that is easier to slip on their hands, powdered products are the solution. There are powdered latex, nitrile and vinyl gloves available.

The history of powdered gloves
According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, researchers began searching for a way to facilitate easier glove donning in surgical applications in the late 1800s. Early methods included wetting the glove material and using various powders, such as talcum powder and a powder made from Lycopodium spores, which are ground pines or club moss. However, both of these powders led to postoperative complications.

Food-grade cornstarch began appearing in gloves by 1947, and by the 1970s, it grabbed the largest market share. Compared to the previous two powders, cornstarch has necessary absorptive properties and does not lead to irritation. Although this powder is currently the most commonly used, gloves are also powdered with calcium or lactose, according to Infection Control Today.

These dusting powders are applied to the gloves near the end of the manufacturing process. After the glove forms are dipped in the glove materials and excess proteins and other residues are removed through the leaching process, the gloves are powdered before they are stripped from their forms. The FDA noted the cornstarch powder mixture is 2 percent magnesium oxide. This keeps the powder from turning into a paste or otherwise thickening.

What are the benefits of powdered gloves?
In the past, natural rubber latex was the main material used for disposable gloves. Latex is a flexible material that closely conforms to the hand, a feature that makes donning difficult for some wearers. This point became more pronounced when glove usage increased as a result of growing awareness of HIV in the 1980s.

To provide more ease in donning gloves, the food-grade cornstarch powder absorbs moisture on hands. This is a key benefit for individuals whose palms are prone to sweating. Additionally, the powder absorbs excess moisture that is present after wearers wash their hands, a step that should be undertaken before gloves are donned.

Powdered gloves are not suitable for all applications, as the cornstarch powder interferes with certain biological and chemical processes, such as chemical sealing and wound closure, respectively. Additionally, the powder damages paints, varnishes and lacquers, and if even a speck of powder lands on a freshly painted surface, it may cause a fish eye. However, outside of these applications, powdered gloves are found in many industries.

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EMS Workers Must Follow Proper Glove Procedures


Emergency medical services (EMS) workers go through a lot of training regarding safety when donning and doffing barrier clothing such as disposable gloves, according to the Journal of Emergency Medical Services.

However, these workers must remember to change their exam grade gloves at appropriate times during a call so they do not contaminate clean surfaces. This is true even if the patient does not have any visible lesions or is not vomiting. Per best practices, EMS workers should don gloves prior to touching a patient and remove them after a procedure or assessment is finished before touching a clean surface.

If workers must come into contact with patients after removing their gloves, they should immediately don a new pair. This indicates that workers should have ample supplies of disposable gloves on hand for the multiple changes.

Additionally, EMS workers need the appropriate gloves for the call. EMS workers frequently choose heavy duty exam grade gloves for the extra protection offered by the additional thickness and extended cuff. Additionally, if they are responding to a call involving dangerous chemicals, such as an on-the-job injury at a manufacturing plant, they must have a glove material that is resistant to the chemical involved in the accident, according to the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

For more information, follow this link.

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The Right Gloves for the Job: Part V Agricultural


In the agricultural industry, workers are involved in a number of tasks where gloves serve as a protective barrier. These duties include working with livestock, handling chemicals such a herbicides and disinfectants and dealing with contaminated soil.

With regard to herbicides and insecticides, there are hundreds of varieties that are used in agriculture, each with chemicals that can be harmful to humans. Furthermore, it is important that personal protective equipment is used to reduce or eliminate exposure to these chemicals.

In the dairy farming sector, glove use has become more common in recent years. Gloves help prevent the spread of bacteria, which is key for dairy farming, as a sick animal is unproductive until it can be brought back to health.

There are various zoonotic diseases, which are those transmitted from animals to humans. One example is brucellosis, a disease that is caused by a bacteria known as brucella and primarily affects animals. However, humans can contract brucellosis if they come in contact with infected animals or animal products. Additionally, livestock handlers need to ensure they are not passing diseases from infected animals to healthy animals.

Workers also need protection when repairing and maintaining their fleet equipment. Whether tractors or combine harvesters, the machines contain chemicals that can cause health issues if they get onto a worker’s hands and absorb through the skin.

“With these risks, agricultural employees need a glove that can stand up to harsh chemicals and bacteria. Nitrile gloves protect agricultural workers from harmful chemicals in pesticides.”

Nitrile and latex gloves for chemicals and pesticides
Agriculture is currently trending toward lighter weight nitrile gloves which offer durability and chemical and pesticide resistance at a competitive price.Nitrile, a synthetic rubber, provides the best overall chemical resistance. Agricultural workers who spend their days spraying pesticides on crops have the risk that they could get the chemicals on their hands which could be absorbed through the skin. Nitrile gloves provide protection that will not easily break down when it comes into contact with harsh chemicals. This protection is also beneficial for guarding against the many fluids that workers can come into contact with while they are performing maintenance on vehicles.

Latex gloves are the second most-common glove in agriculture. These gloves are also donned when workers are dealing with pesticide residues. When handling plants and plant products, workers use latex gloves to protect themselves even if there are not visible signs of pesticides.  While latex previously was the most-used glove type in agriculture, nitrile gloves have become more popular.

Vinyl gloves for tending livestock
When it comes to tending livestock, vinyl gloves are a more suitable option compared to other glove materials, particularly for tasks that require several glove changes in a short time. Vinyl is an inexpensive material that is perfect for short-duration tasks as workers move from animal to animal to prevent cross contamination. Vinyl gloves are common in breeding applications.

Regardless of the application, it is important to remember gloves are not solely for safeguarding workers and livestock. They also protect government and private inspectors. These parties should also don the appropriate gloves to guard themselves and livestock they inspect and ensure the integrity of agricultural facilities.

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Know Your Glove Materials: Part II Latex


When you think of a disposable glove, a latex glove is traditionally what comes to mind. This type of glove has been used in various industries for years for both medical and industrial applications. Let’s take a look into the making and success behind wholesale latex gloves.

Many consumers are familiar with exam-grade latex gloves, which are common in the health care facilities. However, even in this familiar setting, latex is being used less often because of allergic reactions that can result from the material. In some cases, the resulting reaction can be as minor as skin irritation known as dermatitis, but it can lead to anaphylaxis in more serious cases.

Latex allergies stem from the material’s proteins, a result of its origins.

What is latex?
Latex material is a natural rubber that is derived from the sap of the rubber tree. The sap is a polymer, which means it is created from the bonding of many single molecules known as monomers. It must be chemically treated within a short time of being tapped from the tree or else it will harden.

Once the sap is collected, it is turned from a sticky substance into the elastic material consumers are familiar with through a complex process that includes a step called vulcanization. This step, which involves heating the sap, was first coined by Charles Goodyear, whose surname is used for tire and rubber manufacturer Goodyear.

There are also synthetic rubber materials. However, these are not the same as natural latex.

“Latex material is a natural rubber that is derived from the sap of the rubber tree.”

What are the benefits of latex gloves?
One key characteristic of latex is it closely conforms to the hand to offer the best fit and feel. This gives users more dexterity while wearing the gloves. In the dental industry, for instance, dentists may need to handle small objects, such as tooth caps and tiny packets of tooth polish. If they are wearing gloves that loosely conform to their hands, they may have some trouble grabbing these items. Latex, on the other hand, can provide the dexterity and tactile sensitivity required for this and similar tasks.

Latex gloves are extremely flexible, which offers a measure of tear and puncture resistance. This feature is beneficial in applications where sharp objects are used. In the nursing field, for instance, employees use syringes and shears. Additionally, the durability can ensure health care professionals can maintain a safe barrier between themselves and pathogens and avoid passing pathogens from their own bodies to patients.

Although exam-grade latex is more familiar to most consumers, there are also industrial-grade latex gloves, which offer unique advantages for certain applications in auto repair, manufacturing and other tasks.

Latex gloves come in a variety of sizes and thicknesses. The extra thick latex gloves can be used longer and have less tactile sensitivity.

AMMEX imports and distributes top of the line wholesale latex gloves to fit your customer’s needs. Become a distributor today!

AMMEXKnow Your Glove Materials: Part II Latex
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Latex Allergies: Importance of Latex-Free Gloves


As a growing number products are made from latex, latex allergies have become more prevalent, according to the Medscape. Consequently, many industries where latex products like disposable gloves are common, such as the health care industry, have made it their mission to create latex-free environments.

Fayne Frey, a dermatologist from West Nyack, New York, told the Tribune she does not permit latex in her office because of the increased prevalence of the allergy, which she has herself. Additionally, she noted the human body increasingly reacts to latex as an allergen the more it comes in contact with the material, putting health care professionals, salon workers and people who have had multiple surgeries at higher risk for reactions. There are two types of latex allergy: dermatitis and anaphylaxis. The former includes skin irritation. The latter can be life threatening and include a weak pulse and fainting. Repeated latex exposure can escalate a reaction from dermatitis to anaphylaxis.

There are is no cure for a latex allergy, and those who have it must simply avoid the material. For this reason, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology recommends latex-free nitrile or polyvinyl chloride disposable gloves when appropriate as a viable substitute to latex products. Given many people don’t discover they have a latex allergy until their first reaction, end users should consider going with one of the aforementioned alternatives, when possible, to protect themselves and consumers.

 

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The Right Gloves for the Job: Part II Food Processing


Workers in the food processing industry should be required to wear appropriate disposable food processing gloves to protect consumers who eat the foods they handle.

Why You Need the Right Food Processing Gloves

Workers come in contact with a variety of foods, which can carry bacteria that can cause foodborne illnesses such as listeria and salmonella. There are also bacteria that are transferred from humans to food as a result of poor hygiene, such as E.coli, hepatitis A and staphylococcus. Disposable gloves can serve as a barrier between workers hands and these bacteria to lessen the chance of transmission to consumers.

Listeria, for example, is found in soil and water and can be present in uncooked meats and vegetables. Food processing plant workers who do not wear disposable gloves can contaminate their hands if they come into contact with a Listeria-infected food product, thereby leading to cross contamination of other foods they handle. This can result in widespread transmission of Listeria throughout the facility. Stop the spread of unwanted contaminants with the proper food processing gloves.

Additionally, it is not easy for employers to help monitor how well employees wash their hands. However, they can implement a glove program to prevent contamination and employee illnesses from being transmitted to food products. Not only does donning gloves aid in preventing the spread of foodborne illnesses, but it is also mandated by certain government regulations.

 “FDA food contact rules regarding disposable gloves are in place to protect workers in the food processing industry and consumers.  Antimicrobial vinyl gloves prevent the growth of microorganisms by disrupting cell walls.”

Regulations that mandate protective clothing 

The U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has several rules regarding the necessity of gloves for food contact. These rules are in place to protect workers in the food processing industry and consumers.

Here are some the FDA’s Food Code provisions regarding glove usage:

  • Workers must minimize bare hand and arm contact with exposed food that is not ready to eat.
  • Gloves or utensils such as tongs and spatulas must be used for contact with exposed, ready-to-eat foods except when washing fruits and vegetables.
  • Gloves can be used for a single task and must be discarded when workers switch to a new task, the gloves become soiled or the task is interrupted.

The FDA also requires all food processing employees wash their hands. This step can reduce the chance of contamination because it prevents pathogens and other hazardous materials from touching the inside of the glove – one of many best practices for donning gloves.

These regulations make it clear, food processing workers are required to don gloves in certain cases, but which glove is most common in this industry?

Polyvinyl chloride gloves in the food processing industry
Workers who handle food often wear vinyl gloves which are made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC), or simply vinyl, gloves. These are among the least expensive types of gloves and conform to the hand more loosely than nitrile or latex.

One key aspect of vinyl gloves is they are not as durable as other disposable glove materials. While this characteristic may be a detriment for gloves used in other industries where long-lasting puncture and tear resistance over time are important, vinyl gloves’ durability is suitable for food industry standards. This is particularly true in applications that require frequent glove changes.  Another option is blue vinyl gloves. The blue material is easier to find should a piece of the gloves become lost in a food product.

A recent advancement is the development of antimicrobial vinyl gloves that provide additional protection built into the glove material. These gloves prevent the growth of microorganisms by disrupting cell walls. Their antimicrobial and antifungal properties are mixed into the glove material rather than sprayed on so the additional protection cannot be rubbed or washed away.

If food processing employees are handling raw meat at one moment and then need to handle raw vegetables, they need to change their gloves, per the FDA regulations, to avoid cross contamination. In cases where workers need to change gloves often, low-cost vinyl gloves are a great food processing gloves option.

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Growth for Global Disposable Glove Industry

A recent report by Allied Market Research has projected the global disposable glove industry is on track for large-scale growth through 2020. Let’s take a look at the forecasted future for wholesale disposable gloves.

The report forecasted the disposable glove industry will have a 6.2 percent compound annual growth rate (CAGR) between 2014 and 2020. The Allied Market Research report projected a 12.6 percent CAGR for powder-free gloves based on a market shift away from powdered gloves. Several sectors are predicted to be the catalysts for growth, including industrial and nitrile gloves.

Nitrile disposable gloves have become popular in the auto repair industry as a more chemical-resistant and allergy-free alternative to latex. These gloves protect the skin against absorbing harsh chemicals and solvents that are common to auto shops, the California Department of Health Services Occupational Health Branch reported.

The researchers also pointed to several pandemics as the driving forces behind expanded glove use. For example, the recent Ebola outbreak has prompted demand for protective clothing, and multiple sources report the World Health Organization has suggested health workers assisting patients with Ebola don nitrile exam gloves.

Despite current international health concerns, industrial disposable gloves are expected to have the fastest growth of all segments. The report cited that food industries are key drivers of growth in this area and elaborated on the potential expansion for vinyl (PVC) and polyethylene (PE) gloves, which are used in the food processing and service industries, respectively. Disposable vinyl gloves accounted for the second-largest market share – 28 percent – in 2013.

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The Right Gloves for the Job: Part I Automotive


Workers in the automotive industry tend to be seen as hardworking technicians who are covered in oil and grease. In many cases, these substances can present a safety hazard, be hard to wash off skin or even stain light-colored interior.  Here is The Right Gloves for the Job: Part I Automotive –

Transmission fluids, such as brake fluid, for instance, are among the dangerous fluids found in cars. When the fluids are changed or simply filled, there is a chance they could spill on a technician’s hands. After prolonged contact, these fluids can absorb through the skin. The resulting health risks can include nerve damage, weakness in the affected areas and even paralysis. In addition, if the fluids come in contact with workers’ eyes, such as by rubbing their contaminated hands on their faces, eye irritation and redness can occur.

Many automotive mechanics are now protecting their hands by wearing gloves. This provides a barrier between their hands and the many fluids and greases they come in contact with while working on vehicles. While the benefits of wearing gloves in the automotive industry are clear, there is some debate regarding which glove material is best, especially when choosing between latex and nitrile.

The more well-known glove
When it comes to thinking about protective gloves, many people probably think of latex. These gloves are moderately puncture resistant, tear resistant and conform well to the hand. Of course, when working with the rough and at times sharp surfaces that are present under the hood of a car, mechanics want a glove that will not easily tear. However, the lower puncture resistance of latex may mean the gloves can be punctured. Although a hole may be small, prolonged exposure to harmful chemicals and solvents can occur.

There are both powdered and powder-free versions of latex automotive gloves. Powdered latex gloves are easier to don when hands are wet, as the powder can absorb sweat and other moisture. However, powdered latex gloves can present an issue because powder particles can escape into the air and contaminate vehicle finishes, paints, varnishes and sealants. In the automotive industry, this fact has presented issues when windshields are installed. If the powder weakens the seal around the glass, leaks can occur.

This glove material was part of the reason disposable gloves did not make much of an impact on the automotive industry right away. When some latex gloves came in contact with oil, grease and gasoline, they didn’t stand up to the substances, which left many workers looking for a more durable product.

A more durable, latex-free glove
Nitrile is a type of synthetic polymer that does not contain latex. For this reason alone, nitrile gloves are a suitable option for many auto mechanics, as wearers do not have to worry about latex allergies, which can lead to various symptoms that can inhibit a technician’s work. These include hives, itching, skin redness and rashes.

Nitrile is created by combining three monomers: acrylonitrile, carboxylic acid and butadiene. These gloves do a better job of standing up to the many chemicals and solvents – particularly grease, oil and gasoline – auto mechanics come in contact with on a daily basis. This means workers can go through fewer gloves and lower their chance of exposure to hazardous fluids. The resistance is the result of the acrylonitrile.

“Nitrile gloves have excellent tear resistance, which is provided by the carboxylic acid.”

They are also three to five times puncture resistant than latex, a key benefit for auto mechanics who regularly work with sharp objects.  The butadiene is responsible for nitrile gloves’ flexibility. As such, wearers may feel their hands can move freely while wearing these gloves, which can be advantageous if they are trying to reach into a tight space. However, nitrile does not have the elasticity of latex, but will conform to the hand as the glove is warmed by body heat.

Which glove is used more often?
Although latex gloves have some uses in the automotive industry, many mechanics opt for nitrile gloves. Nitrile’s chemical resistance provides a key safety benefit, but that doesn’t mean latex gloves do not have their place in automotive applications, particularly if they are heavy duty, which means they are made to stand up to more intense use.

Coming up next, we’ll explore gloves used in the food service industry.

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